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Mexico's Drug Culture

Mexico's Drug Culture

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Published by Ross
Since President Felipe Calderon's war on drugs in 2006... the violence persists -- with nearly 60,000 people killed... an estimated 140,000 people have been displaced. See the photos. I personally find them disturbing. However, the truth must be shown. The battle lines are shown... this is a sad tale of drugs, deception and misery.
Since President Felipe Calderon's war on drugs in 2006... the violence persists -- with nearly 60,000 people killed... an estimated 140,000 people have been displaced. See the photos. I personally find them disturbing. However, the truth must be shown. The battle lines are shown... this is a sad tale of drugs, deception and misery.

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Published by: Ross on Jun 30, 2013
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10/12/2013

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Mexico's Drug Culture
Since the beginning of President Felipe Calderon's drug war in 2006, Mexican officialshave held press conferences to show detained suspects. At the same time the violence persists -- with nearly 60,000 people killed through 2013. Also, an estimated 140,000 people have moved or been displaced because of security issues related to both the gangsand drugs. Some of these photos are very graphic. I personally find them disturbing.However, the truth must be shown.
 
Ciudad Juarez, August 2009: Three young men died in this shootout in the parking lot of a shopping mall. In the first half of that year, more than 1,000 drug war deaths werecounted in Juarez alone. The city of 1.3 million has been the center of a drug turf war  between the Sinaloa and Juarez cartels.
 
Mexico City, July 2009. Mexico's drug and gang culture has a strong religious streak.Thousands of devotees seen here attend a mass for Santa Muerte, Saint Death, a mythicalfigure condemned by the Catholic Church but embraced by many poor and criminalelements. This gathering is outside a shrine in Tepito, a neighborhood famous for itsstreet markets brimming with pirated and stolen merchandise. It's home to the most popular Santa Muerte shrine, which sits outside a modest home. On the first day of everymonth, the shrine fills with followers who come bearing statuettes of the saint. Some pilgrims make their way from the subway on their knees; many smoke weed (la mota) or cigars with their saints.Devotees of Saint Judas Thaddaeus inhale glue out of plastic bags to get high as theygather outside San Hipolito church during the annual pilgrimage honoring the saint. JudasThaddaeus is the Catholic Church's patron saint of desperate cases and lost causes, but inMexico he is also known as the saint of both cops and robbers (and prostitutes), as well asone of the biggest spiritual figures for young people in Mexico City. He has become thegeneric patron saint of disreputable activities.

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Ross added this note
Later on this year there will be a movie about the same subject, the narcotraffico culture [I found this out the other day]. Unfortunately, the movie will probably glorify this culture of death.
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