Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Dr. Gordon - Dr. W.A. Kritsonis - National FORUM of Educational Administration and Supervision Journal - William Allan Kritsonis, PhD - Editor-in-Chief - Global Website: www.nationalforum.com - National Refereed Journal

Dr. Gordon - Dr. W.A. Kritsonis - National FORUM of Educational Administration and Supervision Journal - William Allan Kritsonis, PhD - Editor-in-Chief - Global Website: www.nationalforum.com - National Refereed Journal

Ratings: (0)|Views: 7|Likes:
Dr. Gordon - Dr. W.A. Kritsonis - National FORUM of Educational Administration and Supervision Journal - William Allan Kritsonis, PhD - Editor-in-Chief - Global Website: www.nationalforum.com - National Refereed Journal
Dr. Gordon - Dr. W.A. Kritsonis - National FORUM of Educational Administration and Supervision Journal - William Allan Kritsonis, PhD - Editor-in-Chief - Global Website: www.nationalforum.com - National Refereed Journal

More info:

Published by: William Allan Kritsonis on Jun 30, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/27/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 NATIONAL FORUM OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION JOURNALVOLUME 29, NUMBER 3, 2012-2013
THE EFFICACY OF AFFECTIVE DOMAININSTRUCTION ON ACADEMICACHIEVEMENT OF AFRICAN AMERICANHIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
Dorothea GordonWalden University
ABSTRACT
Fewer than 50% of African American high school students demonstratedmastery on a math assessment. Affective domain instruction provided the basisfor a study that explored math academic achievement. Research has indicatedthat affective domain instruction improves academic performance and highschool graduation rates. In a quasi-experimental study, the effectiveness of onetype of affective domain instruction, Advancement Via IndividualDetermination (AVID), was examined. No statistically significant differences inmathematics achievement were found between 51 African American highschool students in the AVID group as compared to the 51 in the controlgroup. It is significant for educators to provide affective domain instructionusing the AVID framework, engage in embedded staff development, or explorethe efficacy of instruction on academic achievement. The social changeimplications include providing educators with an evidence-based approach totesting the effectiveness of AVID instruction before implementing theframework to improve student achievement on standardized assessments.
Introduction
he purpose of the study was to examine the impact of AVIDinstruction on mathematics achievement among AfricanAmerican high school students. The objective was tocontribute to positive social change by illuminating the significance of AVID instructional strategies influence on student achievement,especially for African American students.
T
4
 
5
 
 NATIONAL FORUM OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION JOURNAL
According to Varlas (2008), 30% students of United Statesdrop out of high school each school year. The National Center for Education Statistics ([NCES] as cited in Stillwell, 2008) reported thatthe dropout rate among 9th through 12th grade students during 2007-2008 was 25.2%. Stillwell (2008) noted that the dropout rate amongAfrican American students was 6.7%, compared to 2.8% for EuropeanAmerican students. NCES (2010) reported that although the dropoutfor African American is narrowing compared to the EuropeanAmerican student dropout rate (2.8%), from 1971 to 2009 a higher  percentage of European American students than African Americanstudents graduated from high school. In Texas, the dropout rateamong African American students is higher than for any other ethnicgroup by 5% (Texas Education Agency [TEA], 2010). These statisticssuggest that African American students are in more danger of notfinishing high school than other ethnic groups, and the consequencesof this dropout rate may reflect larger social problems. Traditionally,African American students have a larger achievement gap and higher unemployment, as well as higher dropout, juvenile detention, and poverty rates (Carpenter II, Ramirez, & Severn, 2006; Child TrendsDataBank, n.d.; DeCuir-Gunby, Taliaferro, & Greenfield, 2010; InfoPlease, n.d.; Pearce, 2006; TEA, 2007).Among the many factors that contribute to the dropout problemare a lack of educational opportunities and a lack of connection withthe intended learning experience of the mandated state and localcurriculum. A lack of disciplined collective inquiry about the intendedlearning and a lack of a significant teacher-student relationship further contribute to the problem (DeCuir-Gunby et al., 2010; Foote, 2007;Marzano, 2003; Payne, 1995; Schlechty, 2002; Schmoker, 2006;Spring, 2008; Walker, 2006). Historically, the lack of these factorsnegatively affect student achievement and present an educationalinequity (Baker, 2005; Hargreaves, 2003; Lewis, James, Hancock, &Hill-Jackson, 2008; Pearce, 2006; Shipler, 2005; Spring, 2008;Stinson, 2006; Tatum, 2003; Walker, 2006) that exists in in specificcontent areas.
 
Dorothea Gordon
6
Student proficiency in mathematics is below 50% nationwide(Ratner, 2007), which further emphasizes the problem of mathematicsachievement among African American students. The NationalAssessment for Educational Progress ([NAEP], as cited by Aud, 2010)reported in the 2009 math assessment data for eighth
 
grade AfricanAmerican students that a 32% achievement gap exists betweenEuropean American and African American students. If the problem persists, African American students will remain educationallyunderserved unless educators find solutions.One solution might exist with increased teacher-studentrelationships. Payne (1995) noted the importance of teacher-studentrelationships for increased achievement. Payne indicated that beforelearning can occur, educators must develop relationships intended toenhance the educational experience of African American students.Payne further claimed, “For students from poverty, the motivation for their success will be in the relationships” (p. 218). Denton (2008)reported that trust is the foundation for the success of positive teacher-student relationships. Smith and Lambert (2008) also found thatstudents seek out positive connections with their teachers, which mighthelp to foster academic achievement.Instruction that emphasizes positive teacher-studentrelationships helps to build social interactions that contribute tostudent achievement (Advancement Via Individual Determination[AVID], 2010). Kirt (n.d.) referred to this type of instruction asaffective domain instruction. According to Kirt, the
affective domain
consists of interests, attitudes, appreciations, values, and emotional preconceptions. Values, attitudes, beliefs, and emotions construct theframework of the affective domain and their impact on the cognitiverealm of student achievement (De Martino & Zan, 2003).One form of affective domain instruction is provided by theAdvancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) framework.AVID (2010) provides affective domain instruction that integratessocial and academic support to disadvantaged students. AVID’s

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->