Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
JUDGE NOT

JUDGE NOT

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY JAMES YONGE, M. A.


ROMANS zir. 10.

But why dost thou judge thy brother ? Or why
dost thou set at nought thy brother ? For we shall all
stand before the Judgment seat of Christ.
BY JAMES YONGE, M. A.


ROMANS zir. 10.

But why dost thou judge thy brother ? Or why
dost thou set at nought thy brother ? For we shall all
stand before the Judgment seat of Christ.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Jul 03, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/03/2013

pdf

text

original

 
JUDGE OTBY JAMES YOGE, M. A.ROMAS zir. 10.But why dost thou judge thy brother ? Or whydost thou set at nought thy brother ? For we shall allstand before the Judgment seat of Christ.In this and in the following chapter,the Apostle reproves the uncharitable and un-christian habit which appears to have prevailedamongst those to whom he wrote, of judging andcondemning one another for differences of opinion,on certain questions of religion. He explains tothem in what way each party ought to behavetowards the other, and he admonishes them thatall angry feelings, excited by such discussions,ought to be allayed by a consideration of everyman's responsibility to God alone, for the opinionsJUDGE OT.he might entertain. There were at Rome, as inperhaps all the churches in those days, bothJewish and Gentile converts to Christianity, andthe particular questions in debate among them,were concerning the necessity of observing theMosaic ordinances, in regard to clean and uncleanmeats, and holy and profane days. '"Some of theJewish converts, fancying that the meats forbid-den by Moses were unclean in themselves, andthat the days which he commanded to be kept
 
holy were still to be sanctified, looked on theirGentile brethren as profane persons, becausethey partook of all kinds of meats without anydistinction,, and regarded every day alike. Onthe other hand, the Gentiles despised the Jewsas ignorant bigots, for making any distinction inmatters that appeared so indifferent to themj andrefused to admit them into their company."Both parties the Apostle condemns, and instructsthem that they are to live in charitable commu-nion and intercourse one with another, expressingneither censure nor contempt of the pers<»is whodiffered from thejn, but each duly respecting theother's conscientious scruples. lie remindsthem that they are none of them accountable totheir neighbours for their opinions^ that to theirown masters they would stand or fall, and thatall would one day appear before the judgmentseat of Christ, to answer for themselves. And inconsideration of this last most solemn truth, hewarns them that every man ought to be fullypersuaded in his own mind of the propriety of hisown practice, inasmuch as it was sinful to per-mit himself in any thing, of the lawfulness of which he doubted. He concludes the subjectwith this prayer and exhortation; "ow theGod of patience and consolation grant you to belike-minded, that is, to have the same charitabledisposition one towards another, according toChrist Jesus ; that ye may with one mind andone mouth, glorify God, even the Father of ourLord Jesus Christ. Wherefore receive ye oneanother, as Christ also received us, to the gloryof God."ow, although the particular questionswhich caused those dissensions in the Romanchurch, no longer exist, yet the principles whichthe Apostle lays down are of universal applica*
 
tion, whatever be the controversy that dividesthe Christian world, and it shall be my endeavourto show you how they may be made usefulin thepresent day. •My brethren, you cannot be ignorant that avariety of different opinions prevail amongChristians on the subject of their religion ; youcan scarcely go into any society, in which, shouldJUDGE OT.you venture to express your sentiments on somedoctrine, you would not immediately find your-selves suspected of error, and accordingly chal-lenged to dispute. You would have to defendyourselves against objections to that which youhad supposed to be unquestionably true; yourfaith would be attacked in points which you hadpreviously thought to be unassailable ; you wouldbe sneered at for your ignorance by some, byothers condemned for your heresies. Religion,alas ! is degenerated into a mere theme for con-troversy ; the simplicity and unity of the Chris-tian faith are things which we may talk of andadmire in fancy, but which, if we seek for thereality, we shall not find in existence. Christ'sseamless vesture is rent and torn into a thousandshreds, and those shreds so shaped, and coloured,and ornamented, according to the capricious tastesof their various possessors, that even should therebe an universal desire to collect them, and putthemtogether again, they would make but a motleygarment of discordant patch-work, most unlikeindeed to that which, when whole and undivided,seemed to be a perfect model of the manufactu-rer's skill. Were I but to repeat to you the long

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->