Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Gabbatha.

Gabbatha.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY HENRY ALEXANDER DOUGLAS



St, John xix, 13—16.

"When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he brought Jesus forth,
and sat down in the judgment-seat in a place that is called the
Pavement, but in the Hobrew^ Gabbatha. And it was the
preparation of the passover, and about the sixth hour ; and he
saitn unto the Jews, Behold your King I But they cried out.
Away with Him, away with Him, crucify Him. Pilate saith
unto them. Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests
answered, We have no king but Csesar. Then delivered he
Him therefore unto them to be crucified. And they took
Jesus, and led Him away."
BY HENRY ALEXANDER DOUGLAS



St, John xix, 13—16.

"When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he brought Jesus forth,
and sat down in the judgment-seat in a place that is called the
Pavement, but in the Hobrew^ Gabbatha. And it was the
preparation of the passover, and about the sixth hour ; and he
saitn unto the Jews, Behold your King I But they cried out.
Away with Him, away with Him, crucify Him. Pilate saith
unto them. Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests
answered, We have no king but Csesar. Then delivered he
Him therefore unto them to be crucified. And they took
Jesus, and led Him away."

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Jul 03, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/03/2013

pdf

text

original

 
GABBATHA.BY HERY ALEXADER DOUGLASSt, John xix, 13—16."When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he brought Jesus forth,and sat down in the judgment-seat in a place that is called thePavement, but in the Hobrew^ Gabbatha. And it was thepreparation of the passover, and about the sixth hour ; and hesaitn unto the Jews, Behold your King I But they cried out.Away with Him, away with Him, crucify Him. Pilate saithunto them. Shall I crucify your King? The chief priestsanswered, We have no king but Csesar. Then delivered heHim therefore unto them to be crucified. And they took Jesus, and led Him away."MY brethren, the words which I have just read toyou, out of the holy gospel, present to ournotice an extraordinary spectacle. They show usGod Himself upon His trial before one of His owncreatures, and condemned to death for saying that Hewas a king.When thie fiict is stated, in this plain and undis-guised manner, it appears so shocking and so impiousas to be beyond belief. Yet this is the simple truth.The Son of God, in man's flesh, convicted first of blasphemy by His Jewish countrymen, and thenaccused of treason against Caesar before the Romangovernor, is sentenced to die as a subverter of thegovernment, and, in virtue of that sentence, is actuallyput to death upon the cross. The chief among they Google
 
SEBM. XII.] GABBATHA. 147kings of the earth, Caesar, acting by Pontius Pilate,his substitute and representative, condemns to deaththe King of Heaven.The spectacle is indeed extraordinary, and the moreclosely we observe it the more extraordinary does itappear. For the part which Pilate played in this judicial murder of the Son of God was but a secon-dary part. Pilate believed Him to be innocent, andagain and again avowed that such was his belief.Pilate, had he followed his own judgment, andlistened to his own conscience, and been master of his own will, would have dismissed from the bar thatmeek and patient prisoner, without a stain on Hischaracter, without a blot upon His fair renown.Pilate had even made some weak efforts to resist thetorrent of injustice, and to assert tiie strength andmajesty of law, against the clamour of the populacewho cried for blood. Indeed, he had actually goneso far as to declare his prisoner guiltiess at themoment when he passed the sentence of condemnation,and to wash his hands before the whole multitude, toshow that in yielding to their clamours he was nosharer in their guilt. But Pilate, albeit he wasgovernor of Judaea, and representative of that stern justice and inflexible determination which were thechief characteristics of the iron rule of Rome, was aweak and vacillating creature, who bent before thestrengtii of Jewish resolution as trees before a strongblast.In reality, flie leading actors in fliis dreadful tragedywere the Jewish people, and especially the Jewishpriests. Pilato— judge though he was, and seated onthat high tribunal which was erected on the tesselatedRoman pavement, and personating, as he did, the
 
h2Digitized byCjOOQlC148 GABBATHA. [SEEM.Roman authority and Aoman law — waS really neither judge nor ruler, but simply a tool in the hands of Jewish bigotry and prejudice. The real judges of our Lord were the Jewish priests, and the consentersto the judgment of the priesthood were the Jewishpeople. Pilate was nothing but the executor of asentence which had already been pronounced in theJewish council. The guilt of our Lord's death mustlie, no doubt, with the civil as well as with theecclesiastical authority, for Pilate commented to it andcarried it out 3 but the Roman State was only secon-darily guilty, and the chief burden of that most black transgression must be laid upon the Jewish Church.Pilate's hands are red, and he washes them in vain,for the stain of Christ's blood must be for ever onthem. But the chief criminals are those who cried," His blood be upon us and upon our children."That blood has been upon them ever since, and isupon them now.So that the true light in which to regard our Lord'scondemnation is that which presents Him to ournotice as a religious criminal, sentenced by the JewishChurch to die, for violating God's commandments.The reason formally assigned was a mere pretext.When the Jews cri«d out, " If thou let this man gothou art not Caesar's friend : whosoever makethhimself a king speaketh against Caesar," they wereusing an argument which they did not themselvesbelieve, and which Pilate knew to be fallacious.They were no more sincere when they accused our*Lord of subverting the Roman government, and of 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->