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Sir Winston Churchill’s ‘Savrola’: A review

Sir Winston Churchill’s ‘Savrola’: A review

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Published by INDRANIL SARKAR
Sir Winston Churchill was a prolific writer besides being an artist, orator, diplomat and a key-figure and architect of the World War-II. Sir Winston Churchill received the Nobel Prize for literature in 1953 for his numerous published works. Till date, he is the only politician and diplomat to be honoured with the Nobel in Literature.He wrote a novel named 'Savrola'.It is called a 'Ruritanian Romance'.
Sir Winston Churchill was a prolific writer besides being an artist, orator, diplomat and a key-figure and architect of the World War-II. Sir Winston Churchill received the Nobel Prize for literature in 1953 for his numerous published works. Till date, he is the only politician and diplomat to be honoured with the Nobel in Literature.He wrote a novel named 'Savrola'.It is called a 'Ruritanian Romance'.

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Published by: INDRANIL SARKAR on Jul 04, 2013
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05/14/2014

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Sir Winston Churchill
’s ‘Savrola’
: A review
:Indranil Sarkar
Introduction:Sir Winston Churchill was a prolific writer besides being an artist,orator, diplomat and a key-figure and architect of the World War-II. Sir WinstonChurchill received the Nobel Prize for literature in 1953 for his numerouspublished works. Till date, he is the only politician and diplomat to be honouredwith the Nobel in Literature. Although his essays, letters and Magnum Opus, sixvolumes of prose work entitled
‘The Second World War’
are well known to thereading world, his position as a writer of fiction is not so well acclaimed.Again, although every English knowing man knows that it was Sir Winston Churchillwho shaped the final course of World War II and as such shaped the destiny ofthe Modern World, it remains almost overlooked that writing was the main earningsource of this versatile personality. But, his writing career continued parallel to hispolitical career of nearly sixty years. Churchill started writing under compulsion.
 
After the death of his father he had no alternative but to write for survival and
also to pay off his father’s debt
s. His first published work was a series of five
articles captioned ‘Cuban War of independence in the Graphic’.
At that time it was just a bread earning source for him.
His first published book was ‘The Story of theMalakand Field Force’.
It was published in 1898 and was a narrative of the militarycampaign in the present day Pakistan and Afghanistan. And since then his pen wenton pouring out one after another beautiful and highly intellectual literary gemsfrom the fountain of his creative and active mind. These writings ultimatelyestablished him as a stalwart in English prose especially non-fiction. His commenton writing is really memorable.
Writing is an adventure. To begin with, it is a toyand an amusement. Then it becomes a mistress, then it becomes a master, then itbecomes a tyrant. The last phase is that just as you are about to be reconciled to your servitude, you kill the monster and fling him to the public
, Churchill said inone of his speech.S
trange though, it’s a fact
that the great military General as well as the mostpowerful war-time diplomat also tried his hands not only in writing a fiction butalso a poem
entitled ‘Our Modern Watchwords’.
The 40-line Churchill poem waswritten in 1899 or 1900 when Churchill was serving in the 4th Hussars. It waspublished only in 2011. Critics call it a nature poem in the line of Wordsworth andTennyson. It was the only signed poem of the poet that got published.The name of his only fiction is
Savrola: A Tale of the Revolution in Laurania
.It waspublished in 1899. Here, Churchill poured his maturing political philosophy into thecharacter of his hero Savrola. It has been argued that this lifted the novel fromthe 'Ruritanian romance' genre and made it one of Churchill's most significantliterary efforts. It's a moderately fun read, but at heart remains a 'Ruritanian
 
romance'. The writing style appears bad when read through modern eyes. It is alsospeculated that some of the main characters of the story were members from hisown family heritage.Ruritanian Romance: -A Ruritanian Romance gets its name from the centralEuropean country Ruritania. This genre is also called Graustarkian Romances. Thisgenre of novels deals mainly with love, romance, and battle in a fictional country.The characters belong to the aristocratic ruling circle of the society. They aremainly Kings, Princes, and the like. Here, a tune of Myth remains dominant. Thebattle is generally fought for honour and national peace and prosperity. Thegeneral endings of these novels are the restoration of monarchy after a fiercebattle for the throne. Anthony
Hope’s ‘The Prisoner of Zenda’ (
1894) is said to bethe first of this genre of fictions although R.L.Stevenson wrote a similar novelnamed
‘Prince Otto’: A Romance’
in 1883, which was published as early as 1885.
Blenheim Palace, the Churchill family home
Author
’s
Bio.:Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG,OM,CH, TD, DL, FRS, Hon.RA (30 November 1874
24 January 1965) was a British politician who wasthe Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951to 1955. He was born in an Aristocratic family as the grandson of the 7
th
Duke ofMarlborough. Marlborough family was a branch of the noble Spencer family. His

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