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Evolution of Primitive Dwellings

Evolution of Primitive Dwellings

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Published by Crisencio M. Paner
Primitive Dwellings

Early humans are often thought of as dwelling in caves, largely because that is where we find traces of them.
The flints they used, the bones they gnawed, even their own bones - these lurk for ever in a cave but get scattered or demolished elsewhere.

Caves are winter shelter.
On a summer's day, which of us chooses to remain inside? The response of our ancestors seems to have been the same.
But living outside, with the freedom to roam widely for the purposes of hunting and gathering, suggests the need for at least a temporary shelter.
And this, even at the simplest level, means the beginning of something approaching architecture.

The modern history of the cave homes in Spain's northern Andalucia stretches back hundreds of years.
If you wander the hills and valleys surrounding Galera you will be amazed to see just how many abandoned cave houses there are.
Just forty years ago almost all of these rather primitive dwellings were inhabited and it is only since then that they have been abandoned.

Confronted with the need for a shelter against sun or rain, the natural instinct is to lean some form of protective shield against a support - a leafy branch, for example, against the trunk of a tree.

If there is no tree trunk available, the branches can be leant against each other, creating the inverted V-shape of a natural tent.
The bottom of each branch will need some support to hold it firm on the ground.
Maybe a ring of stones.

The first reliable traces of human dwellings, found from as early as 30,000 years ago, follow precisely these logical principles.
There is often a circular or oval ring of stones, with evidence of local materials being used for a tent-like roof.

Such materials may be reeds daubed with mud in wet areas; or, in the open plains, mammoth bones and tusks lashed together to support a covering of hides.
A good example of such an encampment, from about 25,000 years ago, has been found at Dolni Vestonice in eastern Europe.

Primitive Dwellings

Early humans are often thought of as dwelling in caves, largely because that is where we find traces of them.
The flints they used, the bones they gnawed, even their own bones - these lurk for ever in a cave but get scattered or demolished elsewhere.

Caves are winter shelter.
On a summer's day, which of us chooses to remain inside? The response of our ancestors seems to have been the same.
But living outside, with the freedom to roam widely for the purposes of hunting and gathering, suggests the need for at least a temporary shelter.
And this, even at the simplest level, means the beginning of something approaching architecture.

The modern history of the cave homes in Spain's northern Andalucia stretches back hundreds of years.
If you wander the hills and valleys surrounding Galera you will be amazed to see just how many abandoned cave houses there are.
Just forty years ago almost all of these rather primitive dwellings were inhabited and it is only since then that they have been abandoned.

Confronted with the need for a shelter against sun or rain, the natural instinct is to lean some form of protective shield against a support - a leafy branch, for example, against the trunk of a tree.

If there is no tree trunk available, the branches can be leant against each other, creating the inverted V-shape of a natural tent.
The bottom of each branch will need some support to hold it firm on the ground.
Maybe a ring of stones.

The first reliable traces of human dwellings, found from as early as 30,000 years ago, follow precisely these logical principles.
There is often a circular or oval ring of stones, with evidence of local materials being used for a tent-like roof.

Such materials may be reeds daubed with mud in wet areas; or, in the open plains, mammoth bones and tusks lashed together to support a covering of hides.
A good example of such an encampment, from about 25,000 years ago, has been found at Dolni Vestonice in eastern Europe.

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Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Crisencio M. Paner on Jul 05, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/01/2014

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E
 VOLUTION
 
OF
P
RIMITIVE
 D
 WELLINGS
 
Prof. Crisencio Paner, MSc.
 
P
REHISTORIC
D
WELLINGS
 
Early humans are often thought of as dwelling incaves, largely because that is where we find traces of them.
The flints they used, the bones they gnawed, eventheir own bones - these lurk for ever in a cave but getscattered or demolished elsewhere.
Primitive cave dwelling, Dar al Uqur Road, Jabal Shams
 
 
P
REHISTORIC
D
WELLINGS
 
Caves are winter shelter.
On a summer's day, which of us chooses to remain inside?The response of our ancestors seems to have been the same.
But living outside, with the freedom to roam widely for thepurposes of hunting and gathering, suggests the need for atleast a temporary shelter.
 And this, even at the simplest level, means the beginning of something approaching architecture.

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