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Claremont COURIER 4.14.10

Claremont COURIER 4.14.10

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Published by Claremont COURIER
The Claremont Courier is the community newspaper for Claremont, CA 4.14.10
The Claremont Courier is the community newspaper for Claremont, CA 4.14.10

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Published by: Claremont COURIER on Jul 08, 2013
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HOW GREEN IT IS
Documentarians explore the green life through film and travel
Wednesday 04-14-2010
N
75 cents
     I    n    s     i     d    e      t    o     d    a    y     ’    s    p    a    p    e    r
Jude Kieda soon real-ized her interest in theChinese language wouldget her far in this world
Story on page 4
AYSO girls selectsoccer team has plansto hold fundraiser fornational competition
Story on page 24
C
our 
er i
laremont
 
claremont-courier.com
Story on page 5COURIER photo/Steven FelschundneffJosh Tickell and his wife Rebecca Harrell Tickell combined their talents to create the film Fuel a documentary about Americaʼs oil dependence and some of theemerging alternative fuels. They were at Pitzer College talking about the the many green options available in the world today.COURIER photo/Steven FelschundneffClaremont resident Mary Karr takes her dog Baby for a ride on her wheelchair Friday near Claremont Boulevard. Ms. Karr takes her dog on walksaround the industrial park, although she admits both ride most of the way.
On the road again
     M
 
The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published twice weekly by the Courier Graph-ics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is anewspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as period-icals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879.Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: 75 cents. Annual subscription:$52.00. Annual online subscription: $47. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, un-delivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B, Claremont, Cal-ifornia 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2010. Claremont CourierOne hundred and second year, number 30
Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, April 14, 2010
2
On Dreier and Leiga
Dear EditorClaremont’s former Mayor Al Leiga(Readers’ Comments, April 10) has onlypraise for Congressman Dreier’s “no”vote on health care reform for his fel-low Americans.He says it’s a Trojan horse. But let’slook a little deeper.After his “no” vote, the Congressmanstill retains the government-paid, luxuryhealth plan that has been looking afterhim for the last 22 years at full taxpayerexpense. There are no deductibles forthe congressman.The congressman is also one of thosecareer politicians the Republicans claimto hate. Congresman Dreier has neverheld a job in the private sector or reliedupon private insurance for health care.Now we learn from Al Leiga thatwhat’s good enough for CongressmanDreier is not good enough for the rest of us.For my part, I would be more com-fortable now with this reassurance wereCongressman Dreier nobly to renouncehis own fully paid, “socialistic” healthcare so that he can join everyone else inthe private marketplace.
Ivan Light
Claremont
Take the pledge
Dear Editor:For the last four years I have workedas a volunteer Tax Aide helping seniorcitizens to prepare their tax returns.Even with uncomplicated tax situationssome senior citizens are afraid to pre-pare a return themselves because theycannot get through the perceived com-plexity. In general it seems that mosttaxpayers dread completing their owntax return.In contrast to the grassroots view, ourelected officials are oblivious to all thecomplex tax law havoc they continue tocreate.Now is the time to ask all candidatesand elected officials to take a newpledge: “I will prepare my own tax re-turn.” For the gold standard a politicianwill prepare the return using only pen,tax form and calculator. The bronzestandard will allow the use of personaltax software.I am convinced that once politiciansdrink the Kool-Aid of their legislationthey will want to simplify the unbeliev-able complexity of our time-wasting,and often counterproductive tax laws.
Algird Leiga
Claremont
The rambling rants
Dear Editor.Enough already! Letters to the Editorhas become nothing but a soundingboard for the ramblings of DouglasLyon. It is always the same old rant.Why people bother to respond is be-yond me. It is boring. Does no one elsewrite you anymore?Claremont abounds with well edu-cated people. If we must hear from aradical right position week after week,at least print letters from someone whohas a background in history and someunderstanding of the Constitution.Letters used to be my favorite part of the paper.
Dawn Sharp
Claremont
readers’comments
READERS’ COMMENTS
The COURIER welcomes all readers’ commentson any issue or concern. Letters may be submittedby email to editor@claremont-courier.com, by fax621-4072, by mail 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste.205B, Claremont, CA 91711, or hand-delivery.Email is the preferred method.Deadline for submissions in the Wednesday issueis Monday at 3 p.m.; the deadline for the Saturdayissue is Thursday at 3 p.m.The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. We reserve the right to edit letters forspace. Letters should not exceed 250 words.
1
420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205BClaremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4761Office hours: Monday-Friday8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Owners
Martin and Janis Weinberger
Editor and Publisher
Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com
Managing Editor
Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com
Newsroom
City Reporter
Tony Krickl
news@claremont-courier.com
Education and Sports Reporter
Landus Rigsby
reporter@claremont-courier.com
Features Reporter/Obituaries
Brenda Bolinger
brendabolinger@claremont-courier.com
Photo Editor/Staff Photographer
Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com
Calendar
Aimee Ripleycalendar@claremont-courier.com
Back Page
Sammy
sammy@claremont-courier.com
Production
Copy Editor
Grace Felschundneff
Graphic Design
Jenelle Rensch
Page Design
Kathryn Dunn
Advertising
Advertising Director
Mary Rose
maryrose@claremont-courier.com
Classified Editor
Aimee Ripley
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Administration
Office Manager/Legal Notices
Sandy Fasano
legalads@claremont-courier.com
Billing/Accounting Manager
Dee Proffitt
Distribution/Publications
Tom Smith
publications@claremont-courier.com
Circulation/Subscriptions
Judy Rodriguez
circulation@claremont-courier.com
Distribution
Jim Citizen Sprinkle
Interns
Ben Cheney, ReporterLaura French, ReporterJulia Gibas-Jones, ReporterRafael Anguiano, Photographer
 
Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, April 14, 2010
3
 A view of the world
COURIER photosRafael AnguianoAbove, students and visitors enjoy the sights and sounds of the 32nd annual Internationalfestival held at Claremont McKenna College on Saturday.Weezy Yancey-Siegel, in the photo at right, laughs after placing a wreath of flowers onAlyssa Birdʼs head at the 32nd annual International Festival at the Claremont McKenna Col-lege.
T
he Claremont Police Departmenthas issued a warning to collegestudent and residents about aflasher who exposed himself to a studentlast week.
On Thursday at 11:53 p.m., a female Pitzer Collegestudent was walking alone near the area of Sixth Streetand College Avenue when a car pulled up next to her.In the driver’s seat of the vehicle was a man who wasnot wearing any pants and was masturbating. The vic-tim began to walk away from the vehicle, but the manpulled his car ahead of her and began to exit the vehicle.“That’s unusual,” Claremont Police Lieutenant JohnTraber said. “Exiting the car or trying to approach thevictim is rare in these cases and is particularly con-cerning.”The woman ran from the scene and eventually con-tacted a campus cleaning crew, who notified campussafety. Claremont Police officers responded to the areabut were unable to locate the man.He is described as a Hispanic male, age 20 to 30, 5feet 6 inches tall, 200 pounds and has a long beard. Hewas driving an older model multi-colored sedan.Lt. Traber urged residents not to walk alone late atnight or early in the morning to avoid being in harm’sway. Anyone with information regarding this crime isasked to contact the Police Department at 399-5411.
—Tony Krickl
Police issue warning on aggressive flasher 
B
udget cuts have already decimatedcity staff and resources to provideservices to the community. Nowthe future of an entire city departmentcould be in jeopardy as the city deals withits budget crisis.
The Community Services Department, which han-dles sanitation collection and the ongoing maintenanceof Claremont’s celebrated parks and urban forest, couldbe radically transformed in the coming months.At the Community Services Commission meetingon Thursday night, the commission heard a report frominterim Department Director Pat Malloy about themurky future of his department.In fiscal year 2010-11, the department will trim itsbudget by $235,000 and another $300,000 in 2011-12.To close the gap, a total of 4 positions in the depart-ment were eliminated and replaced by contractors.The cuts will affect landscape maintenance in theVillage, Village Plaza, city yard and Oak Park ceme-tery, as well as tree trimming services. Contractors willreplace two city-employed groundskeepers. Anothercity-employed tree trimmer will be replaced by con-tract work.After December 2010, Mr. Malloy will no longerwork for the city. His position has been cut as well,leaving the Community Services Department withouta director.Commissioners expressed concerns about eliminat-ing the department’s top position.“The Department has been beheaded and emascu-lated but still has the major responsibility of presentinga visible image of a well-maintained and attractivecity,” said Commissioner Muriel O’Brien.Commission Gary Garfield was concerned about thelack of leadership for the department without a direc-tor. “Leadership needs to be a catalyst for change orgrowth,” Mr. Garfield said. “Without that position ona permanent basis, I think the city and this departmentwill suffer.”As the department moves towards outsourcing itswork, city-run sanitation services could be the next inline. The city employs 17 full-time and 4 part-time staff members for the solid waste program at an annual costof $5.8 million.In the coming months, the city council will discussthe possibility of contracting out Claremont’s sanita-tion services, a job the city has done itself since it wasfirst incorporated.“Obviously if that particular operation is privatized,that would reduce the department down to just a fewoperating areas,” Mr. Malloy said at the meeting.Claremont Mayor Linda Elderkin has already comeout against privatized sanitation service for the city. Butother council members have pushed for a discussionof the option as they consider more ways to trim its op-erating costs.Other scenarios for the Community Services De-partment are possible. The Department could be down-sized to become a public works department or dis-solved altogether with staff and functions being givento other departments like the Human Services Depart-ment and Engineering.Mr. Malloy said the city is conducting a study onretrofitting the Community Services building and cityyard for converting the building into a police station.“If we lose the solid waste program, there’s nobodyleft in the department,” he said. “We’ve got a mon-strous, beautiful facility down there with just a fewpeople around in there. Right now in the administrativebuilding, there are 6 of us occupying the building withover half the building empty. I mean it’s like a ghosttown.”Also at the meeting, the commission was asked if limiting meetings or subcommittees would be an op-tion to lighten the load on an already overworked citystaff. City staff members must be present at commis-sion meetings and spend significant time preparingstaff reports.“We’re in survival mode right now,” Mr. Malloysaid. “I’ve got 2 ladies there [Management analystsStacey Niemeyer and Anna Sanchez] working theirfingers to the bones. It’s very difficult times.”The Community Services Department is the secondlargest department in the city after police. The depart-ment has 45 employees and a budget of $16.2 million.
—Tony Krickl
Community services take big hit in budget reduction

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