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New Things in Christianity.

New Things in Christianity.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY HENRY J. BEVIS.


" And the disciples of John and of the Pharisees used to fast:
and they come and say unto him^ Why do the disciples of John
and of the Pharisees fast^ but thy disciples fast not? And Jesus
said unto them. Can the children of the bridechamber fast^ while
the bridegroom is with themf as long as they have the bride-
groom with them, they cannot fast. But the days will cofne,
'when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them, and then
shall they fa^t in those days. No man also seweth apiece of new
cloth on an old garment : else the new piece that filleth it up
taketh away from the old, and the rent is made worse. And no
tnan putteth new wine into old bottles : else the new wine doth
burst the bottles, and the wine is spilled, and the bottles will be
tnarred: but new wine must be put into new bottles
ii. 18-22.
BY HENRY J. BEVIS.


" And the disciples of John and of the Pharisees used to fast:
and they come and say unto him^ Why do the disciples of John
and of the Pharisees fast^ but thy disciples fast not? And Jesus
said unto them. Can the children of the bridechamber fast^ while
the bridegroom is with themf as long as they have the bride-
groom with them, they cannot fast. But the days will cofne,
'when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them, and then
shall they fa^t in those days. No man also seweth apiece of new
cloth on an old garment : else the new piece that filleth it up
taketh away from the old, and the rent is made worse. And no
tnan putteth new wine into old bottles : else the new wine doth
burst the bottles, and the wine is spilled, and the bottles will be
tnarred: but new wine must be put into new bottles
ii. 18-22.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jul 08, 2013
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EW THIGS I CHRISTIAITY.BY HERY J. BEVIS." And the disciples of John and of the Pharisees used to fast:and they come and say unto him^ Why do the disciples of Johnand of the Pharisees fast^ but thy disciples fast not? And Jesussaid unto them. Can the children of the bridechamber fast^ whilethe bridegroom is with themf as long as they have the bride-groom with them, they cannot fast. But the days will cofne,'when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them, and thenshall they fa^t in those days. o man also seweth apiece of newcloth on an old garment : else the new piece that filleth it uptaketh away from the old, and the rent is made worse. And notnan putteth new wine into old bottles : else the new wine dothburst the bottles, and the wine is spilled, and the bottles will betnarred: but new wine must be put into new bottlesii. 18-22.One age bequeaths its sayings to another. In theearliest times wisdom appears to have been taughtin the proverbial form, and this form was adaptedfor extensive circulation, since it could be easilyremembered. We have the aphorisms of the menwho lived after the Flood, the household words of the fathers of our race. The proverbs of an agereveal the character of an age ; they are the resultsof the experience of an age. o saying gains univer-sal currency until the age in which it had its birthhas tried it, and proved it to be true. The coin thatr2 ew Things in Christianity.is to pass from generation to generation, and bear itsoriginal impress, must be genuine. The proverbial
 
philosophy of an age is worthy of our attention.There is frequently a volume of meaning in a sen-tence. Proverbs are used not so much to illustrateas to settle opinions; they come with authority. oappeal is made against the voice of the past. Thesayings of the wise on all matters pertaining to thepolicy and business of the world are forcible ; in thisdepartment proverbs are often truths. In all questionsof morals and religion, we must receive with cautionfamiliar expressions, and oft-repeated maxims.Christ frequently used, and with great effect, theaphorisms and sayings belonging to that age; andwhen, as in the passage under our consideration,they are employed to illustrate His teaching, or tovindicate His conduct, they are singularly suggestive.The position which Christ occupied was unlike thatof any other teacher. His teaching was very differentto that of the Scribes. " The common people heardhim gladly." He invited weary and heavy-laden men tocome and learn of Him, that they might find rest fortheir souls. He had a yoke, but it was easy, and aburden, but it was light. He had the truest sympathywith humanity in its lowest and saddest conditions.He had deep pity for man. He knew the sorrowsand wants of the heart ; and His religion was for theinner, rather than the outward life.He was not like John, His forerunner, a stem andew Things in Christianity. 3unsocial man. He " came eating and drinking." Hedined with the publican as well as the Pharisee. . Hecondescended to be the guest of '' a man that was asinner." Men said of Him, — He differs from all thenotions we have formed of a Divine Teacher. Hisassociates are not the ' wise and prudent.' He is the
 
friend of publicans and sinners I He seems to payno respect to our traditions or customs. His inter-pretations of the law are opposed to the commentariesof our teachers. He does not sanction our ritualism.He enjoins no fasts on His followers. He acts as if.He had the power to set aside all the forms andceremonies to which we have attached so much value.He speaks as if He were greater than the Temple.The fault found with Him was, that He was notobservant enough of the letter of the law, and thatHis religion was without ceremonies. The Phariseeswere considered the wisest and holiest of men, andthey fasted, and enjoined fasting as a religious dutyon their disciples. Even the disciples of John fasted.But fasting seemed no part of the religion of this newTeacher. The reason which He assigns for this ismost conclusive and satisfactory: '' Can the childrenof the bridechamber fast while the bridegroom is withthem? as long as they have the bridegroom withthem, they cannot fast." There is to be an agree-ment between the inward life and its outward expres-sion. Sackcloth is not the appropriate attire for thechildren of the bridechamber. Pasting is out of placeB24 ew Things in Christianity.when the occasion demands festivity. Men are tofast when fasting would be the fitting expression of the sorrows of their souls, and not because theChurch has set apart days for fasting. Everythingin religion is to be true. Life must not be a lie, butin all its outward expressions is to utter the truth.Outward forms are of little efficacy in producing astate of feeling which shall exactly correspond withthem. The joys and sorrows of the heart may be

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