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P. 1
“What Life Means to Einstein,” by George Sylvester Viereck. Published October 26, 1929 [PDF].

“What Life Means to Einstein,” by George Sylvester Viereck. Published October 26, 1929 [PDF].

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Saturday Evening Post interview, 10/26/1929
Saturday Evening Post interview, 10/26/1929

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05/14/2014

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THE
SRTURDRY
EVENINGPOST
17
R
ELAT
IV
IT
Y!
What
word II
more
lIymbolicof
theage?
Wehllvecea&ed
to
be
positive of
any·
thing.Welookuponall
things
in
the
light of
relativity.Relativity
hasbecome
the
pl
ay
thing
of
the
parlor
Il
hi
losopher.Is
the
re
any
standard
that
hlU!
not
beencha
l
lenged inthis
our
post
warworld?IsthereBny absolute
lIystem
of
eth
ics,
of
economics orof
law,whosestabilityor
pennanence
is
not
H-
ulled
somewhere? Canthere
be
any
permanentvalue or
any
absol
ute
truth
in
II
world inwhich
thethree
angles
of
the
trianale
have
ceased
to
be
equal
to
twori
ght
angles-
in
a world inwhichtime
itaeJr
has
1011t
itsmeaning.
in
whi
ch
in
fin
ity
becomes finite,
and
the
finite
iA\OIIt
in
the
infin
ite
?
o
II
/
-
--
-
EinJltein'a
patience
is
infinite.Helikes
tn
ex·
plainhis
theories.
A
bom
teacher, Einatein
does
nnt
rt&ent
que.
tions. 1:(:!lnveschildren.
The
ten-year-old
1101'1
ofafri
end
wasconvinced
that
he
had
di
sco
vered
the
secret
of
perpetua
l
motion
.EilUlteinpaina..
takingly
explained
tn
him
the
flawin his
cal·
culationll.
Whenever
a qu
estion
invnl
ving
a
difficult
mathematicalproblem
come.up,Einstein
i
mediately
takelll
up
hill
pencil
and covers pageafterpage with
the
mOflt
int
ri
cate
equatinna.
Hedoes
nnt
refer
to
a
ten..
book;
he
wnrks
nut
such
formulaa
immediately
hirnaelf.
Often
the
for-
mula
thus
obtained
ill
dearer
,
mnre
com
pre.
hemible
and
mnreper.
feet
than
the
equatinn
that
ill
f
ound
in
boola
nfreference.
Tim
e
inSpace
Ein
ll
te
inrefuses
tn
8ponsor newfangledt
he-
ori815
which
drawth
eirjU8tific
at
ion
trnm
hiaown
ll8SIlul
t
upon thecertainties
nf
mathemat-.
iCII.
Hisvnicew
as
bell·
Th.
World
.,..
..
.....
PhJlid
e
bf
...
M
..
,Io.m.,
'c
l",,,
It"..,.,.,,,,,,
Problem
f.
Hb
J.
e
r.'.""
Whll
.
D
Iet","".
to
H
er
R
ECEN
T
LY
someone
ta
lked
to
him
about
tolorphotography.Einatein
immediately
re
 
like
and
gentle,
but
hiswnrds
were
decisive
whenhesmashedwithnne
sente
nce
th
e nlIIh a
pp
licatinn nft
he
term
"relativity" to
philosophy
and
to
life.
"The
meaning
nf r
elativity
,"
he
said,
"has
beenwidelymisunderstood.Pb
ilosophers
playwith
the
wnrd,
like achild
with
a dnll.
Relativity
,u
I
see
it,
m
ere
ly
denntes
tbat
certain
physical
and
mechanical
faeb
,
whi
ch
have
been
regarded
as
poeitive
and
permanent.,
aN!:
relative with
rl'gard
to
cer
tainnther
f
acts
in
the
aphere
nfphysicsa
nd
m
echa
niCII.
It
doea
nnt
mean
that
everything
inlife
is
relativeand
that
we
have
therigbttn
t
umthe
whnle wnrldmiachievoualytoJ'l8Y-turvy."
I
nnw
remembered
that
someyears
agn,
when
Ifirstm
et
Eil\8tein in
New Ynrk,he
had
emphatically
reaiated
the
suggestinn t
hat
he
wu
aphilosopher.
"I
a
m,
"
he
uid
,"lIOlely a physicist."In s
pite
I'll
these denials
,
Einstein8tands
in a aymoolic
re
l
atinn
to
our
age-
an
age charact
erized
by
a
revnltagain
st
the
absolute
in
every
aphere nflICience andnf
thought.
He isachildofhis
age eve
nif
heesche
ws
metaphysi
cs.T
IKE
Na~leo
n,
likeM
UMOlini,
.u
AlbertEinstein
hu
the
distinc
tinn
nf
having becomeanalmoetlevendary
figure in hisown lifetime.
Nn
man
ainceCopemiCUII,Calileo
and Newton
hu
wrought
mnrefun·
damental
chang
..
in
nur
attitude
toward
the
universe.Einlltein's
universe
is
rmite.Seen
throughEinstein
'aeyes,
spaceand time
are al·
m
Ollt
interchangeab
le
terma.
Time
appears
caparooned
all
a
fnurth
dimension.
Space
,
nnceund
efinable,
has
BllS
urned
the
ahape
nf a
sphere.Einstein
taught
us
that
lighttravels
in
curves.
All tht&efa
ctaare
de-
duct.ed
fr
nm
the
theory
nf
relativityadvancedby
Eins
tein
in1915.
W
iththeadvent
nf
Einstein,
mathematics
ceased
to
bean exact
lIC
iencein
the
r
ash
nnnfEuclid.
Th
enewmathe-
matics appeared
in
themidst
nf
the
Wnrld War.
It
is
nnt
impollllible
that
in
the
evnlutinn
nr
human
t
hn
ught
Einatein'adiscovery
may
play
a
greater
part
than
the
Great
W
ar.His
f
ame
may
nutlive
F
och
and
Lud
endorff,Wilson
and
Clemeneeau.EilUltein,in
the
wnrds
of his
favnrite
colle.-gue,
ErwinSc
hriklinger,
explaina
the
fundamental
Ian
nt m
echanics
as
geometrical prnportinna
nfIIpace
andtime
.
t
ahall
nnt
attempt
to expoundth
is
lltatement.
It
is
said
that
nnly
ten
men
undCl"lltand Eil\8tein's
theory
of
relativity.
volved
the
subjectin
hit
mind.He studied
the
camera,
hemade various
ca
l
culations
,
and
befON!:
the
evening
W1Ul
over,he hadevolved
a
newmethod
of col
or
photography.
It
is difficu
lt
f
or
him
to
explain
his
theorie.
whenhe
writes
an article
for
lay
consumption.
But
when
the
inquiringlayman
expUeII
the
abY.eII
of his i(Jlo
rance
f
ace
to
face
with Einstein,
the
gre.-t
mathematician
usually suece!ds
in
bridging
the
gulf
,,';th
an
apt
illustra·
tinn.
Talk
ing
to
him
,
I
uw
in
a
fluh
nnt
only
af
ourth
dimensinn
but
numerous
nther..
G1nwing
with
pride
inmy
achievement,
I
seribbled dnw
na
sentence here
and
there,
but
afterward
my
nnteswere
as
difficult
to
interpret
as
thefantastic
netwnrk
nf a
dream.
"Hnw
tan
1
fnnn
at
least
a
dim
ide.-nf
the
fnurthdimenainn
!"
..
Imagine,"
Ein
s
tein replied,
slightly
inclininghis
head
with
the
crnwnnf
curlywhitehair.flascene
in two-dimensinnal
space-fnr
in·
atance
,
the
painting
01
aman
re
clining
1111
a
be
nc
h.
A
tree
atands
beside
the
be
nc
h.
Then
imagine
that
the
man
walka
from
the
bench
to
arock
11
1'1
t
henthe
r
aidenf
tbet
ree.He
cannnt
reacht
he
rock
except
by
walking
either
infro
nt
nf
nrbehind
the
tree.
Th
isisimpolllliblein
two
di
men
aionalapace.He
can
reach
the
rock only
by
an
excursion
into
the third
dimensinn..
Now
1mapne anntherman
ait,..
t
ing
on
the
bench.
Hnw
did
he
get
there
!Since
twn
bodi
..
cannnt
0c
cupy
the
same
place
atthe
sa
me
time,he can
have
Int
there
onlybe
fnre
or
after
the
lint
man
mnved.
He
rnuat
have
mnved
in
time
.
Time
is
the
f
nurthdimensinn.
In
a
aimi·
lar
manner
it
is
poesible
to
explainfive,aixandmnredimensinns.
Man
yproblema
of
mathematics
areaimpli.
fied
by
U8uming
the
existenCO'):
nf
mnre
dimenllionll."
 
-
110
THE
SIITURDJlY
EVENING POST
Oc
t
obe
r
26,
I
fJ2fJ
,
IN
YOURUNDERWEAR
-,CHANCES
ARE
IT'S
HANES
If
_,
S_I
...
t
Al
b
I
,
"
u.
...
s."
/--"'.u
tI
JtI
.
'h
","h
,.t,
,,,,tIhit.0..
1:1
$1.
H .
.,
Sh
"'l
.J
SJ.rrs
,,,
l-.-t
,
",.,
I
tylll
.tuI
a/.,r,
,oc,
?S
c,
$1.
IV
...
rW
I«,
".
/
~J
Mt
.
~tI
LMt
JEJ
uI
K-
fu",
H'.
"Y
N
I
'
f,h
lJ,
$1.1.
S "
$1.
,
0.
Shi
rll
""J
tI'"
N:
""
?SC
/.$I.
"'ft.
JG
NJ
lA
l£I .
K-hur
L
t,ht
K'f
",/JII
.
Sb.n
,lm'tJ,
,.
""
_,,.,.
IlUU/
,.
"
,h
.
PJ-k6h
k·
.
1
.
til
$1
.,0.
R.J
u.
NI
u
t.
ht~
'
''t.h
ll.
$
1.
00
.
~.Kln
l
tl
IV.1It S.i
l1
1M
""
t
-J
,iris,
.,_
1.
t.
11.
.
aS
e.
Bq,
',
.,_
1."
16,
"M.~;U,
··
7,C
,.
$1
.
MILLIONS
of
HANESg:arrncDts
:lr
e
demandedevery year.
You
maynever
have
bought
a
suit
of
under
wC:l.r
in
your
life
bec:lU5(:
of
2
trade
mark.Butyou probably
go
to
the
storewhereyou always get proper
lit.
complete comfort,longservice.
And
very
likely
you
get
HANIIS.
But
why
talcechances?Dem:and
all
that
good
underwear
can give:.
Paylessthan
y
ou
wouldgladly pay
forsuch
quality
.Simplym.ake
I[
a
habit
to
look
for
tbe
HANIIS
trade
m.ark.
It
isa
guarantee
of
COOstant
satisfaction.
It
pttscnts
mocc
than
twenty-fiveyears
of
experiencein
[he manufacture
of
meo's andboys'
undcnvear.
2nd
an
okehed product
of
one:
of
themost up-to-dategroups
of
mills in
(be:
whole
country.
The
HA
NES
Gold
Label
Elastic
knitLightweight.
illustrated
in
the
center
p.nel
,is
reallyItlIurious
and
ideal
for
work
or
play
.
Like
[he
Red
Label
HeavrWel~h[s
and
Li
ght
weights,
it
IS
k:mtted, IlOt
cut,
to
size-and
neverbunches
or
binds
.
HANIIS
quality
is
not
confined
(0men
who
wearoneparticular
type:
of
unden.vear.
For
HA
NES
makes
garmenu
for
every
need
andseason
.
And
every onc
of
them
is
thc
biggest
valueyou
can
buy
.Jf
yourregul.r
dealer
hasn't
[he
(tlmpkte
l
ine,
write
directto
P.H.
Han
es
Knitting
Co
Winston-Salem
,N.C, appropriatedfromthe open casesasupply for future
WJe
.
Now,inthesnuguniforms worn
by
theWaldorf-Astoriabellhopof
the
period,there was
scant
room
to
hidea
quart
of
champagne. Certainly atight.-fitting blousecould not conceal
an
increment of such size.
Bui
th<*!.ladll were resourceful, and theyhadknown fromexperience
that
thetrousers
ler
had
poIIlIibilitiea
beyond the averageimagination.
It
provedeasyto frisk
out
abottlefrom a
C!!se,
raise thesideof one'sblouse,andslidethe bottledown illllidethe wailltband. Thusladen,all
that
was
now
neco
eery,these youthsevidently eon c\uded,
Wit!!
the cultivationof a convincingair of unconcern.However,one of
the
assistantmanagel'llof theestablishment,whohad
kept
acheckuponbottles as they were brought into theballroom,decided
to
inspect theesses inthe
pantry,
and discovered
that
thesehad beendiseorging their
content. at
a speed littleehort
of
amuinK. Helined
up
for inspection thewholeforee of fortybellhopson
duty.
On
INch
an
oceasion, each
lad
was
r&
quired
tostand
witheyesfront,hands.
at
side,and heelt cloae together.Theformalityproceeded withoutinter ruption until the inquisitors,narrowlyexamining eyesforsignsolguiltanduniforml for unnaturalbUlles. reachedthe middle
of
the
long line. Here the
boy
underscrutinysuddenlygavesigns ofconcern.
He
hadreason. Something cold
was
working itsway down
hiller.
Hegasped, and paled.Immediatelya
quart
bottle ofchampagne
crlUlhed
on thehard floor
at
hisfeet andthe
. r
winespattered and
.s
pread
in
every
dir@e·
tion.Themanager.Startedto
Jrab
t~~
culprit,
but
washalted by a second crash,comingfrom oneend
of
theline.
Anotq~
bottle had slippedfrom a mooring
wa.t·
bandandsliddownatrousersleg
tode¢ru~
tion.
A
thiNi followed
suit
from
a boy
at
theendalreadyinspected.Before
tlie
inspectionwas over, ten bottles
in
the...a
nu
tfashionhad splashedtheir
C<llltiy
content;
uponan unappreciative floor.-,.
Of
eowse
the performanceof the bell.boys
is
not,
~r
at
,
as thelawyerlmight
~
\
evidenee
that
people
used
to
drink morebeforeprohibition than now.
It
was
juit
anexample of
what
might happenwhen
booze
ftowed
80
nearly freelyin
wba~
are often called tbe goodolddays.
Bu
~
what
I
have narrated ought
to
pro
ve
tllat,whatever a comparisonwoulddetermine,
i
n:
lOme
spotea good dealofliquor
used
to
be
drunk
before prohibition. Andcertainly,
~
matter
how
many people'used
to take
liquor,intothe Waldorf during ita
last
ten
yenT8,
it
,
was
small
in
quantityby
comparison with,what
WIUI
consumed onthespotdurinil:a
nd
before the war.
But
1
did not
set
out
"
to
make comparisons.
It
just
makes me a
bit
tired whensomebodytries
to
convineeus
that
little drinking
W88
donebeforeproh
bition.Iam notsayinga
lot
ill
not donenow.WhatIdoassert, inthe light of
what
Ihavereadintherecordsbefore me,is
tbat
people
used
to
eat
morebefore the warthan they do now, and
that
insomeplaces, stu;hast
he
Waldorf-and there were otherspotefavored
by
the constitutional im·biber-there
W88
a tremendOUllotofdrinkingdone,and there was real variety
about
it.
WIHlJlT
LIFlE
MlElllNS
TO
'lEINS1l'lElIN
r
C.II1OII
...
f~
....
p
....
17
)
1tried
to
securean explanation
of
thefifthdimellllion.1 leg-lettolaY
that
Ido
POt
remember the answerclearly.Eineteinlaid lOmething
about
a ballbeingthrown,whichcoulddisappearinone
of
two boles.One
of
these boles wasthefifth, the otherthe sixth dimeneion.Ilind
it
easier
to undentand
Einstein'sdiscovery, promulgated
in
1929, which
u-
plains
tbe
universe in terms of electromagnetimn. But, unfortunately, Einlltein
hu
not yet
completelylIucceededin convincinghimaelf.
He
doesnot lookuponthe
Irix
pail:E!l
that
startled the world, pageeimmediately transmitted
in
facaimile
actop
the ether, as a final conclusion,
To
reach his conclusion,
it
was necesearyfor Eilllltein
to
express gravity in
terme
ofelectricity.
Tbe
formulaneededforthis purpoee is
10
complex,
that
in order
to
explainitsmeaning
he
was compelled
to
create a new
I)'Btem
of advanced mathematics.Eill1ltein'l newsystem leconcilesEuclid withRiemann.
It
resto .... parallel lines,whichRiemannabolished.According
to
Riemann,there can be noparallellinesin a curved universe. Einstein rediscovered parallel linea with theaid ofthe fourtb dimension.
Don't
ask
me
to
explain
the
prO(4
in
detail.
It
is athing
that
can be told
in
aaeries ofintricate equationlwhichno human being,noteven EillllteinhimeelI,
ea.n
visualize.
"No
man
,"
as Einstein said to me,
sit-
tins comfortably on the couch
of
the
litting
100m
of
bill
Berlin home,
..
can
visualize
lour dimeruriotll,
ueept
mathematically.Weeannotvisualize even threedimeneione."
"But
don't
you,"1said,"
think
inf
our
dimenaion!ll"
"Unlortunately,"
Einstein remarked.with asmile,which
Kave
a touchorimpish ness
to
hisfaee,
"my
188t
theory
is
onlyahypotbesis wbich remains
to
be
proved.
It
isdifferent with my theoryofrelativity, whichhas
been
confirmed
by
many independentinvestigatol'lland may
now
be
regarded
88
definitelyestablished." Again asmileplayed
about
hisfaee.creepingfromhiseyea
toward
hischeek.and disappearing in
hill
mustacbe,slightly darker incolor
than
thetangledmass
of
hair on hishead.MfI. Einstein, his wife andcousin,
&9
well as his helpmate, ruled our gl,otea withSlrawbenyjuice and heaped morefruitsalad upon our plates. Einstein nevertakes alcohol in anyform,
but
he cannotresist
the
temptation of tobacco. He Imokeamorecigarettes
tban
beshould,
with
theguiltyenjoyment ofaschoolboy sporti
ng
his
fint
cigar,
It
thrilled me
to
sharestrawberry juiee andfruitsalad with
the
man whoee nameis onevery lip and whOle
thought.
hardlyanyoneunderstand.t..
The
cloaere1ationehip between Einsteina
nd
hisspoUge expreues itaelf in thesimilarity of theirforeheads.Theirfathers were brothel'll and their mothers were
sis
ters.
"I
am,"M.fI, Eirurtein
laid
quietly,"a1most everytbinil:
to
my busband
thatit
is poeaible
to
be."
MI'II,
Einstein re!emblesa portrait of hersister, Mrs.Gumpertz, paintedlOme yearsago
by
Sir Jobn Lavery,calledThe
Lady
witb the Sablea.
..Ithink.
in,
four dimen5iona."he replied,
"but
only abstractly.Thehuman mindcan picture theee dimensions
no
more
than
itcanenvisage electricity. Neverthele!l8, they
lrenp
lelilreal
than
lect~magnetism,
Einstein glew'
up
with
hill
COUIin.
They
were frienda from
the
very be(inninz.Whenfateseparated them early in life,Eillltein married a brilliant woman mathematician, a native of Serbia. Einstein hastwochildren
by
his
firSt
wife.
Hill
c1i.il
d
hood
companion,
the
preeent
MrS.
Einstein,also married and beclune themotber
of
,family.Herhusband died
&fter
a
f.
f'jf.
years of marriage, Then-somefcree.stronJer
than
thoee
whleb
P'n:Ibur
Ein'
steinimpriaonsinhis dynamicequaijona,'
drew
the
two
couelns
together. AlbertEinstein
IJeCUl'ed
a'divorce
frQlTl
his mathe-matical wile and marriedhiswidowedcousin.Perhaps
it
isa mistake for a
phYBi:--:
cist
to
marry a mathematician.T&ere
is,
HANES UNDERWEAR
FORMEN
AND
BOYS
,
FOR
EV£RY
,
-
the
IOtce
which contrail! our universe,,within, and
by
which
we
hive
our
being."
..
I1m particularly
intemted
in
yournew theorywhich proves
thlt
gravity and
eeiec:tricity
are one. Surely
no
sixpagesever written
by
the hand
of
anyscholarhave 10 revolutionized human
thought!"
,
,
 
(
C.
,.
U
.....
d
(,.
.m
P
as.
1
10
)
James
Huneker once remarked
to
me, noroom in onefamilyfortwo prima donnas.
The
!torm
and stress
of
thi!period hasgraven
itsmark
on Einstein'
lI
featuresandin
hill
heart.
Einstein'srelationswi
th
hisform
er
wife arestill friendly.
Hei!
deeplyinterested inthe childrenof his first
mar
riage, andhehas adoptedashis own
the
children sprungfromhiscousin's
fim
union.Oneof hisco
mmentators,
AlexanderMoskowaki,c
al
lsEinstein amasculine sphinx.When Einstein speaks,hisani
mated
raceremindsone
so
mewh
at
ofBriand, except
tbat
h
is
featuresare morerefined and moreintellectual.
If
Briand
e!lPOU8efl
Pan-Eur
ope,Einstein'svision em
bra
cestheworld.
Einstein's
str
uggles with
fatehave left
nob
itte
rnesson histongue.
Every
lineofhis faceexpresses kindliness.It
alllO
bespeaksindomitable
pr
ide. Some friencls
and
admirerslearned
that
he
had decided
to
builda
lIu
mmer
house with his
hard~arned
sav
inp.
They
o
ff
eredhimaprincely gift of land.
But
Einsteinshook hishead.
"No,"
he
gid;
"I
could accept a gift
fro~
acommunity.I
cannot
accept such a giftfromanindividual.
Every
giftweaccept is atie.So
met
imes,"headdedwith
Talmudic
wisdom,"onepays
most
for
the
thinp
onegetsfor
nothing."
H
is
Rtti
c
Re
treat
Although
the
most-talked-aboutscie
nt
is
tof
th
eworld,Einsteinabsolutely
refW1C8
to
capitalizehis reputation.
He
aug~ed
wh
.en
hewas asked
to
indorse
an
Amencan
cIgar
ette
Th
emoneyofferedforhia
name
would'
have
paid
the
expense of hia
su
mm
er
house.Knowing
that
famehas
set
him
apart
from
other
men,hefeela
that
he
must
preserve
at
all cost
theintegiity
ofhis
lIOUI.
Heescapes
the
interviewer.by every
~
sibledevice. HisshynessdIctatesand
hIS
wi
le abets
hia seclusion. Unable
to
check
the
avalanche of offers andrequestswhich overwhelm him,he leaves m
os
t letters,
eve
n fromcelebrities,unanswered.
But
henever ignores even
the
amallestnote fromafriend.
Heturned
downprincely offers
to
exploit histheories
and
his lifeina book for popular consumption.
"I
refuse,"hesaid again
and
agai
n,
"
to
makemoney
~ut
of
my
science.
My
laurel
is
n
ot
forsale like so
many
bales of
cotton."
It
ia
not
generallyknown
that
.ProfeMQrEinateinis
not
merely anexpert mtheup per regionsofhigher
mathe
m
ati
cs
butthat
he
takes
aspecial delight
in
thepracticalsolutionof
te
chn
ic
al problems,such
all
con·
frontthe
huilderof machines
andthe
electricia
n.
Hismind almost instinctivelycomes
to
conclWlionswhich
Cl!capc
theordina
ry
engineer.
He
0"''CfI
his
tra
iningin
th
ispractIcalwork
to
the
fact
that
he
wu
for
se
veral
ye&fII
an
adviser
to
the
Swi
~
patent
office.Itis
thr
ou~
h
workof
th
IS
type
that
Einstein
bas.bwlt
up' amodestf
ortune
whichenableshIm
to
bUIlda house for
him!J(!lt
without
relying upon the mu-nificenceof
the
city
of Berlin.. Einstein
lIOlves
the
mathematu:al
andtechn
ical
pr
oblems
whi
c
~
are.submltted
to
him in
the
lIOlitudeof
hl8
attIc
on
the top
floorof
the
apartment
hoU8C
in
the
H~ber-
landstraMewherehelives.
He fum
l8h
ed
thelit
tle
attic
exclusivelywi
th
therather
primitivefurniturewhich
h~
boughtmany
yeafll ago with his first I18vmp.Iexpected
to
see
queerutensilaandrare tomes in
Einstein'lIlIwet
retreat
.
1
sbould
not
have
beenaurprised
if
hisden
ha~
reo
aembled
the
laboratory
ofa med
Ie
valmagician.
I
was doom
edtodiaappoint
m
ent.
Einsteindoes
not
emu
late
Doctor.
Faust.Th
ereareafewbooks,alsoa fewPlct?res.
Faraday,
Maxwell,
New~n.
~
~a
w
nelt~er
ci
rclesnor
tr
iangles.
Emstem
a onlyIn
II
trum
e
nt
is
the
head.
He
neds
nobooks.Hisbrainishis library Fromhis desk Einstein seesonlyroora-:
an
ocean ofroofs-
andthe
aky.Herehe
la
alone with hisspeculations.Here,
Pa
ll~
like,leapedfromhis headthe
th~rles
which
have
revolutionizedmodern
socnce.Here
no
human
interferenceimpedes
the
THE
SIITURDAYEVEN/NGPOST
flight
of
his thoughts.
Even
hia wife does
not
ente
rthis holy of holies
without
trepi
dat
ion.
AlbertEinstein does
not bury
himself
in
his
st
udies
uninterruptedly
.
He
is
not
amollycoddle physical1y.Heloves
aquatic
sports.
His
favor
ite
toyis a sailboat withall modern technical
improvements,'
inwhichhe enjoYll himself
on the
lakes
and
the rivers near his
country
place,Cap
uth.
A towelwrapped
fantast
ically aroundhis head, helooksmore likea
pirate
than
like aprofessor of a
great
university,
Battling
with
the
wind, heforgets
relativity
and
the
fourthdimension. When the
spray
glistensin
the
silver of his
hair
andthe
su
n
st
rokeshischerublikef
eatures
,
hIS
thoughts
arefarfrom curvedtimespace.
Our
Int
e
llec
tual
Dem
oc
ra
cy
A
speculativethinker, a practical engineer, a
sportsman
and
an
artist,
Einsteincomes
close
to
the
Greekidealof harmonioWldevelopment.Whenhe
neither
sailshis
boat
nor
permits
hismind
to
meander
thr
oughf
ourth-dime
naionalspace,Einsteinenjoys himself with his violin.While
I
waited
at
the
door ofhis
apartment
,
it
seemed
to
me
that
I
heardstrainsof elfinmusic.
Perhaps
it
wasEinsteinplaying.
When
I
entered, hewas wrapping up hisviolinfor
the
night likea
motherputting
herchild
to
bed.Professor Einsteinlooks morelike a
mu
sician
than
likea
mathema
tician.
"
If,
"
he
corneled
to
me,with asmile
that
washalfwistful, half apologetic,
"I
were
not
a pbysicist,I would probablybe a
mWli
cian.
I
often
think
in
mWl
ic.Ilive
mydaydreams
in music.
I
see
my
life in
terms
ofmuslc
."
"
Perhaps,"
Iremarked,
"if
you
had
chosen
to
become a
mWl
icianyouwouldoutshineRichardStraU88 and ScMnberg. Pe
rhapsyou
would
have
given
WI
the
musicof
thesp
heres
or
afourlh-dimensionalmusic."Einstein gazeddreamily-was
it
into
the
farcornenlof
the
room,
or
was
it
intoapace-
that
spacewhichhis investigations
have
robbedof infinity!"I
cannot
tell," he replied,
"if
I would
have
done
any
creativew
ork
ofi
mportance
inmWlic,lIut
I
do
know
that
I
getmost
joy
inlife
out
ofmyviolin."
As
a
matter
offact,Einstein'lI
taste
in
mWli
c
if!
8CVerely
cla.vical.
Even
Wagneris
to
himno unalloyedfeast
of
the
eanl.
He
adoresMo
zart
andBa
ch.Heevenprefers their work
to
the
architectural music
of
Beethoven.
."
ril,
.
Mlulul
pp
l
G
..
(
e
.a.,
PresidentHindenburg
hardly
ever appears inpublic,because he isimmediately recognized wherever he goes. For
thesa
mereason, Professor Einstein refmesallinvi
tations
to
themorepopular
restauranu.
Althoughhis worldfame
co
mpelshim
to
seek isolation,he
is
asociablebeing.
He
loves
quiet chats
overhis own dinner
table
withsuchfriends
as
GerhartHauptmann
and
Profevor
Schr6<iinger.Hereads only little.
Modem
fiction does
not
seduce him.Even insciencehe limits himselflargely
to
hisspecialfield. .. Reading afteracertainage diverta
the
mind
too
muchfrom
it.
~
ative pursuits.
Anyman
wboreads
too
much
and
uses
his
own
bra
in
too
little
fallsi
nto
lazy
habits
of thinking, jWlt
88
the
manwho
spe
nds
too
muchtime in
the
theater
is
tempted
to
be
content
with livingvicariouslyinstead
of
livinghis own life."
In
his own field
of
thought
Einsteinfollowseveryd
evelopment with
keeninterest. He
has the
gift ofreading
at
aglancea whole page
of
equations. Einstein
canmaster
awholenew
syste
mof
mathematicsin
halfan hour.
"Who,"
I
askedbim,
"are
your greatest
contemporaries?"
"1
cannot
reply
to
this question," Einstein answered, his eyestwinkJing
humor
ously,"w
ith
out
compiling
an
encyclopedia.
I
cann
ot
e,-:cn
diseusaintelligently
the
menwho labor in
my
ownfield
without
writinga book.
"O
ur tim
e,"
he added,
"is
Gothicin
it.
spirit. Unlike
tbe
Renaissance,
it
is
notdominatedby
afew
outstanding
pel'llOnalities.
Thetw
enti
ethcentury
has
esta~
lished
the
democracy
of
the
intellect.
Inthe
republic
of
art
and
science
there
arem
any
menwho
take
anequallyi
mportant
part
in
the
intell
ect
ualmovements
of
our
age.
It
s
the
epoch
rather
than
the
indi
vidual
that
is
important. There
isno one
dominant
pel'llOnality like GalileoorNew
ton.
Even in
the
nineteenthcenturytherewerestill a
few
giantswho
outtopped
allothers.
Today the
generallevel ismuch higher
than
eve
rbefore in
the
history
of
the
world,
but
there
are
few men whoees
tature
immediate
ly
llets
them
apart
fromall
others."
.. Whomdo
you
consider
the
m
oat
conspicuous worker
inyour
own
field!"
Th
e
Con
te
mporary
Gr.at
"Itia
not
fair," Einstein replied,
"to
single
out
individuals.
In
Germany,
I
con
si
derSchr6<iinger
and
Heisenbergas being
of
specialimpo
rtan
ce."
"SchrOdinger!"
1
said."
Whathas
hedone
?"
"Schr
6<iinger
hu
discovered
the
mathe
mat
ical