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Love.

Love.

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Published by glennpease
BY GEORGE SWANN.


If I speak with the tongues of men and of an-
gels, but have not love, I am become as sounding
brass, or a clanging cymbal. And if I have the
gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all
knovAedge; and if I have all faith, so a^ to remove
mountahis, but have not love, I am nothing. And
if I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and if
I give mAj body to be burned, but have not love, it
profiteth me nothing,"
BY GEORGE SWANN.


If I speak with the tongues of men and of an-
gels, but have not love, I am become as sounding
brass, or a clanging cymbal. And if I have the
gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all
knovAedge; and if I have all faith, so a^ to remove
mountahis, but have not love, I am nothing. And
if I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and if
I give mAj body to be burned, but have not love, it
profiteth me nothing,"

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Published by: glennpease on Jul 16, 2013
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03/24/2014

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LOVE.BY GEORGE SWA.If I speak with the tongues of men and of an-gels, but have not love, I am become as soundingbrass, or a clanging cymbal. And if I have thegift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and allknovAedge; and if I have all faith, so a^ to removemountahis, but have not love, I am nothing. Andif I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and if I give mAj body to be burned, but have not love, itprofiteth me nothing,""The night has a thousand eyes,The day, it has but one.But the light of the whole world diesWith the set of sun.'The mind has a thousand eyes,The heart, it has but one,But the light of the whole life diesWhen love is done.'*The subject of love can be discussed underthree heads as follows :1. Importance of love in the scheme of Godand man.2. The kind, of love we must have.' 3. Grounds upon lohich 2ve can love the Un^lovable.1. Importance of love in the scheme of Godand man.The Corinthians, to whom my text was spoken,144
 
LOVE 145were GREEKS. The Greek pursuit after ORA^TORY almost amounted to worship. Theystressed it more than our American Indians didBRAVERY. They had schools for teaching it.What they would do to become orators is well il-lustrated by the great Greek orator, Demosthenes.He had an impediment in his speech, yet he wasso anxious to become an orator that he went tothe seashore, put a pebble in his mouth, and spokeagainst the noise of the sea. So ardently did hepractice that he became one of the world's greatspeakers. He well represented the Greek desireto become noted as speakers.ow a great light will break upon the first partof the text when we think that it was spoken topeople with the same desire that Demostheneshad. Listen at Paul: 'Though I speak with thetongues of men and AGELS, and have not love,I am become as sounding brass, or as a clangingcymbal."Reader, pause and think until the force of thewords reach your heart. What did Paul say, ineffect, to these Greeks? It was about equivalentto the following :''Greeks, I well know your great striving to be-come orators; I know how you stress its impor-tance upon all your young men, but let me remindyou that there is something else to be stressedmore than oratory. This will mean more to youthan all else. It alone will give oratory a soul.What if you do become the greatest speakers thathuman language can make you? What if you do
 
146 SWA'S SERMOSstudy all the classics, and all rhetoric, and areable to marshal the tints of roses, and the glory of sunsets, and the majesty of mountains, and theawfulness of storms and volcanoes, and thrill of the stars ? Yea, let me go one step further : Whatif you could call down and speak the very lan-guage which the AGELS of heaven speak?What if you are able to change an audience fromtears to laughter at your will? Let me say to youthat to have such a power WITHOUT LOVE is nomore than beating on a TI PA ! It is no moreattractive nor valuable than if you would turn upan old brass kettle and beat on the bottom ! Lovealone is the FIRST pursuit of every human being.It alone will give all else a soul and value/'Reader, this was exactly what Paul said in ef-fect to the Greeks. It was not very complimen-tary to their loveless passion for becoming ora-tors. It was pulling down the Greek ideal fromthe sublime to the ridiculous. ' Yet it was the sur-geon's knife of love cutting out the cancer of death. It seemed enough in itself to set the Greek to thinking. But Paul did not stop here.The Greeks had other ideals which they pur-sued only a little less than Oratory. They lovedto delve into the MYSTERIES. Anyone familiarwith Greek literature knows how careful theGreeks were, when setting out upon any impor-tant mission, or beginning any great work, to con-sult the oracles or mysteries. They had prieststrained to all the craft of mysteries. The great-est Greeks studied and gave heed to the mysteries.

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