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The Link, issue 25

The Link, issue 25

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Published by cabralyc
The Link is produced by Krishnamurti Link International (KLI). Photographs in The Link were taken by Friedrich Grohe unless stated otherwise. Contributions, whether anonymous or not, do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or publisher. Anyone wishing to reproduce extracts from The Link is welcome to do so, with the exception of reprinted letters and copyrighted articles.

The Link is free of charge. Additional copies of this or previous issues may be obtained by contacting The Link staff at:

Chalet Solitude
1659 - Rougemont
Switzerland

email: kli@kmail.ch
The Link is produced by Krishnamurti Link International (KLI). Photographs in The Link were taken by Friedrich Grohe unless stated otherwise. Contributions, whether anonymous or not, do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or publisher. Anyone wishing to reproduce extracts from The Link is welcome to do so, with the exception of reprinted letters and copyrighted articles.

The Link is free of charge. Additional copies of this or previous issues may be obtained by contacting The Link staff at:

Chalet Solitude
1659 - Rougemont
Switzerland

email: kli@kmail.ch

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Published by: cabralyc on May 16, 2009
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10/18/2011

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The LinThe Lin
IssueNo
25
·
2005–2006
 
The Link · No 25
2
Front Cover: Great banyan tree, Rishi Valley, India
The Newsletter 
Editorial Note 3Dear Friends 4K: Love Is a Dangerous Thing12Letters to the EditorFacing the Fear of Death 14The Blind Alley of the Ideal 15Why the Teachings Seem Not To Work 17K: On Marriage18ArticlesI Am That Man 20Psychotherapy and Wholeness 23K: Fragmentation, Negation and Wholeness24Between the City and the Forest 27David Bohm’s First Meeting with K 30The Finite and the Infinite 33K: Changing the Unconscious34Pushing the Boundaries – an appreciation of David Bohm 35K: Journeying to the Heart of Sorrow38
On Education
Krishnamurti on the Timetable 40K: That Sweeping Nothingness44Krishnamurti on Living and Education 47In the Light of Learning 51Proposal for a Centre for Teacher Learning 54K: Knowledge and Pure Observation56
International Network 
Events 58AnnouncementsInauguration of the Krishnamurti Centrein Hyderabad, India 59Book Review:
On Krishnamurti 
61K: The Beginning of Thought63Addresses 65
 
 3
Editorial Note
Looking down on
the land from the airplane during a recent flight, I could not help notic-ing the tremendous impact that we human beings are having on the planet. The whole earthis now the object of our use and cultivation. Landing in the cities and towns, I am over-whelmed by the enterprising and milling multitudes and the innumerable commercial estab-lishments bursting with every conceivable product. But behind the inviting prospects of consumer bliss and its immediate rewards (a visit to the bookstore, the museum or thecafé), there lurks the feeling of an artificial and ultimately impoverished reality attendant onan essentially materialistic civilization. What seems clear is that all this amazing display of human ingenuity is the result of the brain’s capacity for thought. It is thought that, in itsdrive for survival, has generated the current world with its undeniable achievements. But,riddled as it is with greed, aggression and duality, the power of thought is proving evermore destructive at all levels of relationship. So self-knowing, which K defined as the truework of man, was never more urgent than now, as it entails the dissolution of the core illu-sions behind our fragmented thinking and thereby the survival and integrity of life itself.In this issue of The Link we bring together a number of strands in this urgent movementto wholeness. The artificial life of the city and the teeming life of the primal forest are poeti-cally contrasted. The understanding of nature and the ultimately indivisible bond betweenmind and matter are explored. A reminiscence of David Bohm’s first meeting with K bringsback the exalted flavour of those earlier days of intense inquiry into the totality of being.The role of the psychotherapist in relation to the patient and their shared humanity isapproached from a non-dualistic angle. The educational section centres on learning, whichis examined in the context of the teacher-student relationship, the direct contact with K’steachings and the very process of learning itself. A presentation on the opening of theHyderabad Study Centre offers some pointers as to what is involved in setting up such aninstitution and a review of an introductory work on K for a philosophical series approaches,among other things, the question of the possible inclusion of K’s work in the university.Perhaps at no other time in history has the intrinsic limitation of thought been made soevident. The great ideological and theological systems have collapsed and the little me inwhich mankind has taken refuge is but another form of the same residual consciousness.The unsustainable quality of our socioeconomic structures does not augur well for thefuture and war is accepted as the inevitable outcome of the increasing competition fordwindling natural resources and political dominance. Peace and order cannot come fromthe prevailing cult of self-interest and neither can they come from the New Age therapeuticbazaar. Thought has indeed come to the end of its tether and the unknown is ever moreinsistent in its gathering emptiness. Choiceless awareness is the application of thatunknowingness to the relational field of everyday existence. Such a state of sensitivelearning is the necessary ground of creative freedom.
 Javier Gómez Rodríguez, October 2005
Editorial NoteEditorial Note

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