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Table Of Contents

Preface
1.1 Installing from Red Hat Linux’s Packages
1.2 Installing from Debian Packages
1.3 Installing Apache on Windows
1.4 Downloading the Apache Sources
1.5 Building Apache from the Sources
1.6 Installing with ApacheToolbox
1.7 Starting, Stopping, and Restarting Apache
2.2 Installing mod_dav on a Unixish System
2.3 Installing mod_dav on Windows
CHAPTER 3
3.1 Getting More Details in Your Log Entries
3.2 Getting More Detailed Errors
3.3 Logging POST Contents
3.4 Logging a Proxied Client’s IP Address
3.5 Logging Client MAC Addresses
3.7 Not Logging Image Requests from Local Pages
3.8 Rotating Logfiles at a Particular Time
3.9 Rotating Logs on the First of the Month
3.10 Logging Hostnames Instead of IP Addresses
3.11 Maintaining Separate Logs for Each Virtual Host
3.12 Logging Proxy Requests
3.13 Logging Errors for Virtual Hosts to Multiple Files
3.14 Logging Server IP Addresses
3.15 Logging the Referring Page
3.16 Logging the Name of the Browser Software
•Recipe 3.17
3.17 Logging Arbitrary Request Header Fields
3.18 Logging Arbitrary Response Header Fields
3.19 Logging Activity to a MySQL Database
3.20 Logging to syslog
3.21 Logging User Directories
4.1 Setting Up Name-Based Virtual Hosts
4.2 Designating One Name-Based Virtual Host as the Default
4.3 Setting Up Address-Based Virtual Hosts
4.4 Creating a Default Address-Based Virtual Host
4.5 Mixing Address-Based and Name-Based Virtual Hosts
4.6 Mass Virtual Hosting with mod_vhost_alias
4.7 Mass Virtual Hosting Using Rewrite Rules
4.8 Logging for Each Virtual Host
•Recipe 4.9
4.9 Splitting Up a Logfile
4.10 Port-Based Virtual Hosts
4.11 Displaying the Same Content on Several Addresses
4.12 Defining Virtual Hosts in a Database
CHAPTER 5
Aliases, Redirecting, and Rewriting
5.1 Mapping a URL to a Directory
5.2 Creating a New URL for Existing Content
5.3 Giving Users Their Own URLs
5.14 Redirecting Unreferred Requests to an Explanation Page
5.15 Rewriting Based on the Query String
5.16 Redirecting All—or Part—of Your Server to SSL
5.17 Turning Directories into Hostnames
5.18 Redirecting All Requests to a Single Host
5.19 Turning Document Names into Arguments
5.20 Rewriting Elements between Path and Query String
5.21 Rewriting a Hostname to a Directory
5.22 Turning URL Segments into Query Arguments
5.23 Using AliasMatch, ScriptAliasMatch, and RedirectMatch
CHAPTER 6
Authentication and Authorization
6.1 Using System Account Information for Web Authentication
6.2 Setting Up Single-Use Passwords
•Recipe 6.3
6.3 Expiring Passwords
6.4 Limiting Upload Size
6.5 Restricting Images from Being Used Off- Site
6.6 Requiring Both Weak and Strong Authentication
6.7 Managing .htpasswd Files
•Recipe 6.8
6.8 Making Password Files for Digest Authentication
6.9 Relaxing Security in a Subdirectory
HTTP, Browsers, and Credentials
•Recipe 6.10
6.10 Lifting Restrictions Selectively
Weak and Strong Authentication
6.11 Authorizing Using File Ownership
6.12 Storing User Credentials in a MySQL Database
6.13 Accessing the Authenticated Username
•Recipe 6.14
6.14 Obtaining the Password Used to Authenticate
6.15 Preventing Brute-Force Password Attacks
6.16 Using Digest Versus Basic Authentication
6.17 Accessing Credentials Embedded in URLs
6.18 Securing WebDAV
6.20 Restricting Proxy Access to Certain URLs
6.21 Protecting Files with a Wrapper
6.22 Protecting Server Files from Malicious Scripts
•Recipe 6.23
6.23 Setting Correct File Permissions
6.24 Running a Minimal Module Set
6.25 Restricting Access to Files Outside Your Web Root
6.26 Limiting Methods by User
6.27 Restricting Range Requests
6.28 Rebutting DoS Attacks with mod_evasive
6.29 Chrooting Apache with mod_security
6.30 Migrating to 2.2 Authentication
6.31 Blocking Worms with mod_security
6.32 Mixing Read-Only and Write Access to a Subversion Repository
6.33 Using Permanent Redirects to Obscure Forbidden URLs
7.2 Installing SSL on Windows
7.3 Generating Self-Signed SSL Certificates
7.4 Generating a Trusted CA
7.5 Serving a Portion of Your Site via SSL
7.6 Authenticating with Client Certificates
7.7 SSL Virtual Hosts
7.8 Wildcard Certificates
CHAPTER 8
Dynamic Content
8.1 Enabling a CGI Directory
•Recipe 8.2
8.2 Enabling CGI Scripts in Non-ScriptAliased Directories
8.3 Specifying a Default Document in a CGI Directory
8.4 Using Windows File Extensions to Launch CGI Programs
•Recipe 8.5
8.5 Using Extensions to Identify CGI Scripts
8.6 Testing that CGI Is Set Up Correctly
8.7 Reading Form Parameters
8.8 Invoking a CGI Program for Certain Content Types
8.9 Getting SSIs to Work
8.10 Displaying Last Modified Date
8.11 Including a Standard Header
8.12 Including the Output of a CGI Program
8.13 Running CGI Scripts as a Different User with suexec
8.14 Installing a mod_perl Handler from CPAN
8.15 Writing a mod_perl Handler
8.16 Enabling PHP Script Handling
8.17 Verifying PHP Installation
8.18 Parsing CGI Output for Server Side Includes
•Recipe 8.19
8.19 Parsing ScriptAlias Script Output for Server-Side Includes
8.20 Getting mod_perl to Handle All Perl Scripts
8.21 Enabling Python Script Handling
CHAPTER 9
Error Handling
9.1 Handling a Missing Host Field
9.2 Changing the Response Status for CGI Scripts
9.3 Customized Error Messages
9.4 Providing Error Documents in Multiple Languages
9.5 Redirecting Invalid URLs to Some Other Page
9.6 Making Internet Explorer Display Your Error Page
9.7 Notification on Error Conditions
10.1 Securing Your Proxy Server
10.3 Forwarding Requests to Another Server
10.4 Blocking Proxied Requests to Certain Places
10.5 Proxying mod_perl Content to Another Server
10.6 Configuring a Caching Proxy Server
10.7 Filtering Proxied Content
10.8 Requiring Authentication for a Proxied Server
10.9 Load Balancing with mod_proxy_balancer
10.10 Proxied Virtual Host
10.11 Refusing to Proxy FTP
11.1 Determining How Much Memory You Need
11.2 Benchmarking Apache with ab
11.3 Tuning KeepAlive Settings
11.4 Getting a Snapshot of Your Site’s Activity
11.5 Avoiding DNS Lookups
11.6 Optimizing Symbolic Links
11.7 Minimizing the Performance Impact of .htaccess Files
11.8 Disabling Content Negotiation
11.9 Optimizing Process Creation
•Recipe 11.10
11.10 Tuning Thread Creation
11.11 Caching Frequently Viewed Files
11.12 Distributing Load Evenly Between Several Servers
11.13 Caching Directory Listings
11.14 Speeding Up Perl CGI Programs with mod_perl
11.15 Caching Dynamic Content
CHAPTER 12
Directory Listings
12.1 Generating Directory/Folder Listings
12.2 Display a Standard Header and Footer on Directory Listings
12.3 Applying a Stylesheet
12.4 Hiding Things from the Listing
12.5 Searching for Certain Files in a Directory Listing
12.6 Sorting the List
•Recipe 12.7
12.7 Allowing a Client-Specified Sort Order
12.8 Specifying How the List Will Be Formatted
12.9 Allowing the Client to Specify the Formatting
12.10 Adding Descriptions to Files
13.4 Solving the “Trailing Slash” Problem
13.5 Setting the Content-Type According to Browser Capability
13.6 Handling Missing Host: Header Fields
13.7 Alternate Default Document
13.8 Setting Up a Default “Favicon”
13.9 Directory Listings in ScriptAliased Directories
13.10 Enabling .htaccess Files
13.11 Converting IBM/Lotus Server-Side Includes to Apache
APPENDIX A
Using Regular Expressions in Apache
APPENDIX B
Troubleshooting
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Apache Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Apache Administration

Apache Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Apache Administration

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There's plenty of documentation on installing and configuring the Apache web server, but where do you find help for the day-to-day stuff, like adding common modules or fine-tuning your activity logging? That's easy. The new edition of the Apache Cookbook offers you updated solutions to the problems you're likely to encounter with the new versions of Apache.

Written by members of the Apache Software Foundation, and thoroughly revised for Apache versions 2.0 and 2.2, recipes in this book range from simple tasks, such installing the server on Red Hat Linux or Windows, to more complex tasks, such as setting up name-based virtual hosts or securing and managing your proxy server. Altogether, you get more than 200 timesaving recipes for solving a crisis or other deadline conundrums, with topics including:

Security Aliases, Redirecting, and Rewriting CGI Scripts, the suexec Wrapper, and other dynamic content techniques Error Handling SSL Performance This book tackles everything from beginner problems to those faced by experienced users. For every problem addressed in the book, you will find a worked-out solution that includes short, focused pieces of code you can use immediately. You also get explanations of how and why the code works, so you can adapt the problem-solving techniques to similar situations.

Instead of poking around mailing lists, online documentation, and other sources, rely on the Apache Cookbook for quick solutions when you need them. Then you can spend your time and energy where it matters most.

There's plenty of documentation on installing and configuring the Apache web server, but where do you find help for the day-to-day stuff, like adding common modules or fine-tuning your activity logging? That's easy. The new edition of the Apache Cookbook offers you updated solutions to the problems you're likely to encounter with the new versions of Apache.

Written by members of the Apache Software Foundation, and thoroughly revised for Apache versions 2.0 and 2.2, recipes in this book range from simple tasks, such installing the server on Red Hat Linux or Windows, to more complex tasks, such as setting up name-based virtual hosts or securing and managing your proxy server. Altogether, you get more than 200 timesaving recipes for solving a crisis or other deadline conundrums, with topics including:

Security Aliases, Redirecting, and Rewriting CGI Scripts, the suexec Wrapper, and other dynamic content techniques Error Handling SSL Performance This book tackles everything from beginner problems to those faced by experienced users. For every problem addressed in the book, you will find a worked-out solution that includes short, focused pieces of code you can use immediately. You also get explanations of how and why the code works, so you can adapt the problem-solving techniques to similar situations.

Instead of poking around mailing lists, online documentation, and other sources, rely on the Apache Cookbook for quick solutions when you need them. Then you can spend your time and energy where it matters most.

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Publish date: Dec 21, 2007
Added to Scribd: May 16, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780596519735
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