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Calling All Muslims - Radio Broadcasts of Muhammad Asad.

Calling All Muslims - Radio Broadcasts of Muhammad Asad.

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Published by SmartyFox
The following seven radio broadcasts were delivered by Muhammad Asad (formerly, Leopold Weiss) from Lahore at the request of the Government of Pakistan in the late summer of 1947 i.e. immediately after the separation of Pakistan from India.

The broadcasts were delivered by Asad in English, and were repeated in Urdu by Radio Pakistan's translator the very same evening.

This work is part of the book "This Law of Ours and Other Essays".
The following seven radio broadcasts were delivered by Muhammad Asad (formerly, Leopold Weiss) from Lahore at the request of the Government of Pakistan in the late summer of 1947 i.e. immediately after the separation of Pakistan from India.

The broadcasts were delivered by Asad in English, and were repeated in Urdu by Radio Pakistan's translator the very same evening.

This work is part of the book "This Law of Ours and Other Essays".

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Published by: SmartyFox on Jul 23, 2013
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11/19/2013

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Calling All Muslims
(A collection of Muhammad Asad’s Radio Pakistan addresses, 1947)
 
 
Author's Note
The following seven radio broadcasts were delivered by me from Lahore at therequest of the Government of Pakistan in the late summer of 1947 i.e., immediatelyafter the separation of Pakistan from India. The times were extraordinary and asthe whole world now knows, accompanied by countless killings of innocent people(amounting to a loss, on both sides, of about a million lives) as well as mass -migrations of Muslims from Hindu India and vice versa - under the most appallingconditions imaginable. On their journey from East Punjab, Delhi and other parts of India, the sufferings of the Muslim refugees - comprising hundreds of thousands of men, women and children - were almost indescribable. They arrived by train, buses, bullock carts and on foot, With only as much of their belongings as theycould carry by hand; and many of them had been cruelly wounded and m everyway maltreated on their flight to Pakistan. I myself have witnessed - and officiallyreceived - a whole trainload of Muslim women arriving at Kasur (West Punjab), allof them stripped of their clothing and absolutely naked.First aid to these unhappy refugees was our foremost task. Food, clothing and medical supplies - the latter a scarce commodity m the Pakistan of those stormydays - had to be supphed by day or by night to many thousands of utterly helpless,frightfully suffering human beings.In addition to the necessity of coping with a flood of destitute refugees, theGovernment of Pakistan, so suddenly called upon to assume power, did not as yet possess the necessary experience in administration. Moreover, shortly before theactual partition the new "national" Government of India (headed by PanditJawaharlal Nehru) had removed almost all Muslim army units from North to SouthIndia - Madras Travencore etc - so that West Pakistan was left with no more thanone battalion of the Baluch Regiment and one company of the 8th PunjabRegiment, wholly insufficient to secure our long frontiers with India in the face of steadily growing Indian troop concentration.In result, chaos and apprehension grew steadily in Pakistan, especially in WestPunjab. Lawlessness became the order of the day, accentuated still further by the
 
selfishness and greed of some elements among our population, who had began toregard the newly born state of Pakistan as a legitimate area of self-aggrandizementand all manner of corrupt and corrupting activities. But over and above everythingthere was fear - something previously unknown among the Muslim population of what had now become West Pakistan: fear of an imminent invasion of numericallyinfinitely superior Indian forces.It is against this background of chaos, despondency and growing corruption thatthese seven broadcasts, "Calling all Muslims", were delivered by me daily inEnglish, and on repeated in an Urdu translation on the very same evening. WithGod's help, many of our compatriots have been morally aided by those broadcasts,which went straight from the heart of one individual Muslim to all his brothers and sisters who were able and willing to hear them.In any event, I hope this small contribution of mine may offer a further documentation of a period so incisive for the birth of Pakistan and, through it, for the Muslim world as a whole.

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