Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Link, issue 19

The Link, issue 19

Ratings: (0)|Views: 74 |Likes:
Published by cabralyc
The Link is produced by Krishnamurti Link International (KLI). Photographs in The Link were taken by Friedrich Grohe unless stated otherwise. Contributions, whether anonymous or not, do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or publisher. Anyone wishing to reproduce extracts from The Link is welcome to do so, with the exception of reprinted letters and copyrighted articles.

The Link is free of charge. Additional copies of this or previous issues may be obtained by contacting The Link staff at:

Chalet Solitude
1659 - Rougemont
Switzerland

email: kli@kmail.ch
The Link is produced by Krishnamurti Link International (KLI). Photographs in The Link were taken by Friedrich Grohe unless stated otherwise. Contributions, whether anonymous or not, do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or publisher. Anyone wishing to reproduce extracts from The Link is welcome to do so, with the exception of reprinted letters and copyrighted articles.

The Link is free of charge. Additional copies of this or previous issues may be obtained by contacting The Link staff at:

Chalet Solitude
1659 - Rougemont
Switzerland

email: kli@kmail.ch

More info:

Published by: cabralyc on May 17, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/18/2011

pdf

text

original

 
The Lin
No
19
· Autumn/Winter
2000
 
The Link · No 19
2
The Link is produced by Krishnamurti Link International (KLI). Photographs in The Link weretaken by Friedrich Grohe unless stated otherwise. Contributions, whether anonymous or not,do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or publisher. Anyone wishing to repro-duce extracts from The Link is welcome to do so, with the exception of reprinted letters andcopyrighted articles. The Link is free of charge. Additional copies of this or previous issues maybe obtained by contacting the address on the back page. If you would like to pay for The Link,please send instead a donation to one of the K activities in your country (see pp. 45–51), sinceinternational bank charges may excessively reduce the value of small contributions.
The Newsletter 
Editorial3Dear Friends4Letters to the Editor7The Business of Living7An Undistorted Mirror8Transformation and Infallibility9Worldviews10What Is It that Prevents Change11Interpretation of the Teachings14The Reprieve18K: There Is No Fixed Point21K: Can We Think Together23Book Review: The Inner Live of K24
On Education
The Invisible Made Visible28An Informal Community34Self-Conceptualisation37
International Network 
Events43Announcements43New Books45Addresses45
Cover Picture: Badenweiler, Black Forest, Germany
 
 3
The Newsletter
Editorial
This issue of The Link contains about 12.000 words. Some of these words arejust conveying information to people all over the world, others raise questionswhich might touch the very way we look at life. Of course, to distill meaningfrom words and sentences is a complex and highly individual affair (see also thearticle ‘On Interpretation’on pg.14). Words are in no way sufficient to createmeaning, something easily overlooked today when the immersion in words hasbecome such an obsession that we feel that what is not verbalized or convertedinto knowledge does not even exist. Do we ever ‘allow’the conscious, directedactivity of thought to go into abeyance? Can we just stay with sensory aware-ness without being taken over by thinking? Do we ever allow space for silence,even if for only a quarter of an hour during the day, or one evening during theweek, or a few days in a year? Or is the movement of knowledge and thinking sohabitual and we give it such importance that we continue it without a break?Why this relentless focus on one mode of being?There are several articles raising questions on these lines in this issue,although their starting point and the way they go about it differs widely. Onpg.8and pg. 18 we have two accounts which describe beautifully how the worldchanges when we experience full, undivided sensory awareness. These accountsare a reminder of how limited and conceptual our “normal” way of being is. Inthe diary notes on pg.28 the author explores – from a background of having twochildren at school – the many steps which lead to the overriding authority of knowledge and how this, at the same time, creates fear and the invalidation of what is not known. Don’t miss the letter on pg.7 which approaches the issueofthe known from an almost contrary position.One of our most deeply held convictions is the assumption that we exist asaseparate “me”. This central piece of our knowledge is under scrutiny in asummary of a thesis entitled ‘Self-Conceptualisation(pg.37). The author sug-gests– supported by scientific evidence – that there is no central core in the formofa “me”. Krishnamurti seems to sum it up in his answer to a question (pg.21)where hestates that we are looking for fixed points, but that there are none,either in ourselves or outside in the universe. To live without these fixed pointsisour challenge.
 Jürgen Brandt 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->