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Wake Up India (Vol. XXVII No. 2)

Wake Up India (Vol. XXVII No. 2)

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Published by cabralyc
Wake Up India is the journal of the 'New Life for India Movement'. For information about the Movement write to: Dr N. C. Ramanujachary, Secretary, 'New Life for India Movement',
The Theosophical Society, Adyar, Chennai 600 020.
THE THEOSOPHICAL PUBLISHING HOUSE Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India Fax:91-44-4901399 Phones: 4911338 & 4466613 E-mails: tphindia@md5.vsnl.net.in; theosophy@netkracker.com Regd. No. RN 30538/78 ISSN 0972-186X

NEW LIFE FOR INDIA MOVEMENT A Movement for Right Citizenship, Right Values and Right Means The Movement stands for. * Right citizenship based on regard for social and public welfare, overriding personal, group or sectarian interests. * The recognition of right values and the adoption of righteous living. * Fulfilment of individual and collective responsibility in private and public life.* Concern for conservation of the earth's resources. * Contribution to order; peace and beauty in one's environment.* Alleviation of suffering, starting with one's own neighbourhood.Printed and published by S. Harihara Raghavan, Manager, Vasanta Press, The Theosophical Society, Adyar, Clicnnai 600 020, India
Wake Up India is the journal of the 'New Life for India Movement'. For information about the Movement write to: Dr N. C. Ramanujachary, Secretary, 'New Life for India Movement',
The Theosophical Society, Adyar, Chennai 600 020.
THE THEOSOPHICAL PUBLISHING HOUSE Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India Fax:91-44-4901399 Phones: 4911338 & 4466613 E-mails: tphindia@md5.vsnl.net.in; theosophy@netkracker.com Regd. No. RN 30538/78 ISSN 0972-186X

NEW LIFE FOR INDIA MOVEMENT A Movement for Right Citizenship, Right Values and Right Means The Movement stands for. * Right citizenship based on regard for social and public welfare, overriding personal, group or sectarian interests. * The recognition of right values and the adoption of righteous living. * Fulfilment of individual and collective responsibility in private and public life.* Concern for conservation of the earth's resources. * Contribution to order; peace and beauty in one's environment.* Alleviation of suffering, starting with one's own neighbourhood.Printed and published by S. Harihara Raghavan, Manager, Vasanta Press, The Theosophical Society, Adyar, Clicnnai 600 020, India

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Published by: cabralyc on May 17, 2009
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WAKE UP INDIAA Movement for Right Citizenship, Right Values and Right MeansMay ray five elements -Earth, Water, Fire, Air and Ether (or space) - becomepurified. May I become the light (or the Divine Principle of life andintelligence), free from impurity and evil. To this end, I offer this oblationinto the consecrated Fire. YAJURVEDA Taittiriya Aranyaka 10-66-1The ancient vedic worship ofpancha bhutha-s (five elements) is a tribute to MotherNature which consists of Earth, Water, Fire, Air and Sky. These elementscomplement each other to create a harmonious world which is millions of years old.They benefit all the living beings and contribute to each other in a cyclicalprocess which constitutes the harmonious flow of our past, present and future.The judicious use of these natural elements by humankind makes our environment aliving paradise. The abuse of our environment brings disaster to the individualand mankind.Of all the lives on this earth, Mother Nature has endowed man with all theintelligence and evolutionary advantages and entrusted him with the responsibilityof upholding and protecting this world. Western mythology personifying man asAtlas holding the world on his back is a typical symbolic expression. Let usprotect the earth to protect ourselves. Editorial C. V. AGARWAL SOME REFLECTIONSON THE PRESENT STATE OF THE WORLD AND GROUNDS FOR HOPE 'Triple is this gate ofhell, destructive of the self — lust, hate and greed; therefore letman renounce these three.' Bhagavadgita, XVI. 21Modern scientists propound several astounding concepts which their predecessors acentury ago would have considered fanciful, baseless speculations of philosophers.Some of these are: The universe is expanding limitlessly; there is a law ofgravitation which brings every object near to every other, promoting balance andstability; every object is in constant motion, nothing is fixed and permanent,that is, the law of impermanence operates.Concepts like these have profound implications, and one who broods over them,assimilates them and lives by them, becomes transformed and even enlightened. Theconsciousness of such a person goes on expanding limitlessly. However, suchprinciples have not .reached the masses and few among those who have heard of themhave gone deep into their import.The present scientific terminology is new, as it should be, due to changing times,but thoughtful people realize, that the principles mentioned have been known towise, enlightened ones, sages and seers from times immemorial. The masses seem tohave forgotten them, brushed them aside, or ignored them. This has led people toembrace 'lust, hate and greed' which lead them to the 'gate of hell', as theBhagavadgita puts it. In other words, these three, which sway the masses thesedays, are at the root of the suffering, misery, violence, and terrorism dominatingthe world in the present era.Material objects are limited, and must be so, but craving for them is unlimited.Hence the competition, envy, jealousy, and ceaseless effort to possess them andwithout the least consideration for the genuine needs of others. The ensuingdeprivation leads to the suffering of the deprived and the resultant struggle foracquisitions creates constant anxiety and unhappiness.The root cause of all this is ignorance, that is, overlooking the facts of life.In its constant movement, the mind rushes faster and faster, hither and thither
 
without stopping to 'observe'.Let us ask what we want? Is it not happiness — though a few seek bliss? Butunfortunately pleasure is mistaken for happiness, which means that certainvibrations in the sense organs lasting only a few minutes, are sought after. Aspleasure lasts only 2 Wake Up India .Editoriala short while, the struggle becomes more intense and even aggressive. One goes onto grab, whether it be material objects, power, position, status, name or fame.One fails to think what one will do with that which has been acquired by a long,bitter, unhappy struggle. Or how long will it last? Newspaper reports are full ofstories of vast properties unaccounted for, bank lockers are full of jewellery andcrores of cash, which none can use or even glimpse. Much of this is accumulated bycheating and depriving others of their lawful due. Lust begets hate. Such peopleare in the limelight, others try to follow in their footsteps.Fortunately, a large number of people do not indulge in such deeds and there arecertainly persons with strict morals and high principles. Such people spread themessage of the unifying power of love — perhaps not universal love — which drawsall closer, like the gravitational field. Such people, though not in the news,need the support and encouragement of all who really want peace, harmony andhappiness.Are there guidelines or principles explored in simple language for the common manto consider? All the great teachers have given such guidelines according to theneeds and understanding of those who come to listen and learn. In India the mostwidely known are the Five Precepts, the Pancasila of the Buddha and the FiveYamas, vows of self-restraint, enunciated in a slightly different form byPatanjali. They both begin with Ahimsa which does not mean merely not killing,which is undoubtedly much needed at the present time, but abstaining frominflicting any injury, suffering or pain on any living creature by thought, wordor deed. Such an attitude cannot be imposed by a rule of conduct but arises fromlove, from a glimpse of the essential unity of all.In the words of Dr I. K. Taimni, 'Hatred, dishonesty, deception, sensuality, andpossessiveness are some of the common and ingrained vices of the human race, whichhave surfaced in this Dark Age, Kali Yuga.' We need to be aware of these inourselves,then proceed to make others aware. Such action is essential for all who call forIndia towake up. •This is not the place to expound the precepts in detail. It is obvious that wemust not take property, money or goods not belonging to us and also abstain fromappropriating intangible things, such as credit or privileges which are not ourrightful due. Colonel H. S. Olcott's life is a noble example of this, for he tookno credit for anything he did, let alone for what he did not do.The precepts do not speak of giving up all pleasurable experiences such as eatingtasty food or listening to music, but what needs to be avoided, is the craving forthe repetition of pleasurable sensations which causes the mind to rush after themwith resultant ill effects.One needs to develop an attitude of non-possessiveness. It is not the quantity ofthings with which one is surrounded but the attitude towards them which matters.TJiere are many examples. April - June 2002 Editorial
 
Without dwelling on the philosophical aspects, everyday observation of the worldreveals the impermanence of all that exists. Those in power rise and fall as doriches and a superfluity of useless things — such as a hundred pairs of shoes.Such accumulation involves a struggle to acquire and anxiety to keep them, not tospeak of psychological factors like competition and envy which deprive one ofhappiness, may be requiring tranquillizers and sleeping pills. Should not allthinking persons spend a few minutes a day renouncing non-necessities? If somestart the day with such an attitude and practise it gradually and selflessly, themessage will spread fast and there will be a marked reduction in evil, such asviolence, terrorism, corruption, hatred and competitiveness.A story about the last moments of Alexander the Great brings home the fate ofaccumulations obtained by a great struggle. When he was lying on his deathbed,tens of thousands of Greeks gathered round the palace, weeping, lamenting andcrying: 'Who will now protect us?' Alexander summoned his trusty generals and,praising their obedience to his commands even at the risk of their lives, asked ifthey would fulfil his last wish. They nodded, but began to tremble, wondering whatambitious assignment Alexander had for them on his deathbed. Alexander said thatwhen his funeral procession was taken out, his hands should be kept out of theshroud for the people to see his palms. The generals were astonished and said,'Sire, this is not done, the people will blame us for negligence'. Alexandersmiled for the last time and replied,' I want people to see that this greatest ofconquerors is taking nothing with him.' This teaches us a great lesson.A poet puts it thus: He asks a new-born baby, 'You come straight from God. Whatmessage do you hold in your closed fists?' The baby closes his eyes and lips aspeace and happiness radiate from his face. O When a smorgasbord of information andentertainment lies at the touch of a finger, how long can we concentrate on anyone train of thought? Can we allow ourselves the time to reflect, or resolve anemotional conflict? Both the speed of the internet, and the wealth of informationit offers, militate against certain thought processes. We become good at multi-tasking and skim-reading, but less good at the kind of reflection andcontemplation which is essential for true originality and emotional wisdom.Madeleine Bunting The GuardianTrial of Political Bosses DAVID ANNOUSSAMYA Minister made a startling statement one day in public: 'However I try, it isimpossible for me to avoid corruption, I am driven to it from all sides.' This isan indication of the level the cancer has reached. Whether it is suffered orgreedily desired corruption, it has to be curbed effectively if the nation is toprogress. Soon after assumption of office the new Prime Minister declared such atask to be one of his main priorities. Suggestions have to be made to him from allsides to combat this complex social evil.Some time ago, a brake was put, even preliminary to the prosecution itself, withthe investigation machinery being kept under the control of the Executive. In thisway, political bosses had created for themselves a haven of impunity. A PrimeMinister could even say challengingly, 'Let the law take its own course.'The response to the problem from the political fold has been to float a bill .onLokpal. The idea has been in the air since 1964, but the institution never saw thelight of day even though government after government has given assurances on thematter. Even assuming that the Act comes into existence, and the Lokpal is givenvast powers of investigation, that will solve only the problem of the initiationof prosecution. This has been already taken care of to a large extent by the

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