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Our Eternal House Not Made With Hands

Our Eternal House Not Made With Hands

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY ROBERT WALKER



2 COR. V. 1.

For we know that if our earthly house of this taberna-
cle were dissolved, we have a building of God, an
house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.
BY ROBERT WALKER



2 COR. V. 1.

For we know that if our earthly house of this taberna-
cle were dissolved, we have a building of God, an
house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jul 24, 2013
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OUR ETERAL HOUSE OT MADE WITH HADSBY ROBERT WALKER 2 COR. V. 1.For we know that if our earthly house of this taberna-cle were dissolved, we have a building of God, anhouse not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.THE prospect of a blessed immortality is one of themost powerful supports to the people of God, amidst allthe trials of their present state; and therefore hope iscompared to an anchor, which being cast within the veil,keeps the soul firm and unmoved, so that nothing fromwithout can disturb its inward peace and tranquillity.This was the true foundation of that courage and con-stancy with which the apostles and primitive Christiansendured and overcame the most grievous sufl'erings.Faith presented to their view a far more exceeding andeternal weight of glory ; in comparison of which theirpresent afflictions appeared so light and momentary,that they were incapable of giving them much pain oruneasiness, as the Apostle more fully declares in theclose of the preceding chapter. And being unwilling toleave such an agreeable subject, he further enlarges up-on it in the words of my text : " For we know, that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved, wehave a building of God, an house not made with hands,eternal in the lieavens." Death itself can do us no realprejudice; on the contrary, we have reason to welcomeit as a friend, because, when it beats down these tene-ments of clay in which we are lodged, or rather impri-
 
SERMO LXVII. 415soned upon earth, it only opens a passage for us into afar more commodious and lasting habitation, where weshall possess the greatest riches, the highest honours,and the most transporting pleasures, without intermis-sion, and without end.I. He compares the body to an earthly house, yea toa tabernacle or tent, which is still less durable, andmore easily taken down; and therefore the dissolutionof such a frail thing ought not to be reckoned a verygreat calamity. To this he opposes, in theII. place, The glorious object of the Christian hope,which he calls a building of God, an house not madewith hands, eternal in the heavens. — And,III. He expresses the firm persuasion which he had,in common with all true believers, of being admitted in-to that glorious and permanent dwelling-place, as soonas the earthly tabernacle should be dissolved.Each of these particulars I shall brieiiy illustrate,and then direct you to the practical improvement of thewhole.I BEGI with the first of these heads, which respectsour state and condition upon earth. And in the descrip-tion here given us, there are several things that deserveour notice.ist. The body is called a house ; and it may well getthis name, on account of its curious frame and structure,all the parts of it being adjusted with the greatest exact-ness, insomuch that there is not one member redundantnor superfluous, nor any thing wanting that is necessaryeither for ornament or use.But it is principally with relation to the inward inha-
 
bitant that the body gets the name of a house in the text.It is a lodging fitted up for the soul to dwell in. It isthe residence of an immortal spirit, and from thence it41G SERMO LXVII.derives its chief honour ami dignity. As God createdthis earth, before he made any of the creatures whichwere to inhabit it, and as the world w as completely fur-nished with every tiling necessary and desirable, beforeman, its intended sovereign, was introduced ; so lilie-wise, in the formation of man, God began with the body,and first completed the outward fabric, before he breath-ed into it a living soul. How foolish then are they whospend all their thoughts and cares upon the bodies, andoverlooic those immortal spirits within, for whose useand accommodation they were solely intended 5 espe-cially when it is considered, in t!ie2d place, That the body was not only made for theservice of the soul, but that it is likewise composed of tiie meanest materials, even of tiiat dust w hich we tram-ple under foot. Upon tiiis account the Apostle calls itin the text, not merely a iiouse, but an earthly house.Thus we are told, (Genesis ii. 7.) " that the Lord Godformed a man of the dust of the ground." one of us can claim an higher extraction. We may all say tocorruption. Thou art my father, and to tiie worm, thouart my mother and my sister. And as tlie body is anearthly house with respect to its original, so it is con-stantly supported and repaired by that which grows outof the earth, " The liing iiimsell','' saith Solomon, " isserved i)y the field ;*' yea, after a little time, we must allbe reduced unto earth again. These bodies will shortlymix with the common clay. Dust we are, and unto dustwe shall return. Tiiis, I confess, is a very humbling re-presentation ; but as it is true, it ought not to be slightlyregarded by any of us; and young people, in a peculiar

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