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Love Not the World

Love Not the World

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Published by glennpease
BY ROBERT WALKER


1 John ii. 15.

Love not the world, neither the things that are in the
world: If any man love the world, the love of the
Father is not in him.
BY ROBERT WALKER


1 John ii. 15.

Love not the world, neither the things that are in the
world: If any man love the world, the love of the
Father is not in him.

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Published by: glennpease on Jul 24, 2013
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02/10/2014

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LOVE OT THE WORLDBY ROBERT WALKER 1 John ii. 15.Love not the world, neither the things that are in theworld: If any man love the world, the love of theFather is not in him.Jr ROM these words I propose, by divine assistance,I. To describe that excessive or sinful love of theworld, from which the Apostle here dissuades us.II. To inquire wherein the malignity of this sin con-sists.in. To lay before you a few symptoms of a worldlymind, and examine some of the apolo2;ies upon whichmen flatter themselves with Ijeins; free of it. And,IV. To enforce the exhortation, and give some di-rections how to get this undue affection towards earthlythings mortified and subdued.I. It will readily occur to you, that the exhortationis to be understood under certain restrictions. The placeof his works which God has appointed us to inhabit,cannot in itself be supposed an object deserving ouraversion or dislike. This would be to impeach the good-SERMO LXXIII. 477ness of our Creator, and to tax his bandy- work with
 
ini|>erfection. We may lawfully love the world, as it isthe workmanship ol God, and the mirror in which webehold the perfeetions of the invisible Creator. Creationis a large instructive volume, and the sense of every lineis God. The proper use of all the creatures is to lead usupwards to him that made them, and to kindle in oursouls the warmest gratitude to that unwearied Benefac-tor, who has provided so liberally for our comfort andhappiness. They are naturally the means of supportingour bodies while we are employed in those duties whichwe owe to God, and they also enable us to supply thewants of others, to lessen the miseries, and to heightenthe lawful joys of our fellow creatures. On all these ac-counts we may and ought to value them as real bless-ings, which may be improved to the most important pur-poses.But our love of the world becomes excessive and sin-ful, when we give it that room in our hearts which is on-ly due to God ; when it is desired for its own sake, as asufficient portion independent of his favour and friend-ship. If the world will keep its due place, it may be va-lued and esteemed in that |)lace: but if it usurp an high-er station, and promise more than it is able to give, itmust be rejected, as a deceiver, with abhorrence andcontempt. When we seek after earthly things, merelythat our inordinate desires may be gratified, that thepride of our hearts may be cherished, or our ambitionattain its object; when we are not contented with ourdaily bread, and that portion of the good things of lifewhich is sufficient to sustain us during our pilgrimage toa better country — then is our love of the world undueand excessive; and the more we desire it under j^uch478 SERMO LXXIII.views, the worse, the more corrupted and estranged fromthe love of God, will our hearts become. This leads me,
 
II. To inquire wherein the malignity of this sin con-sists. This will be most eflfeetually illustrated by consi-dering how deeply it taints the whole character andprinciples of action.There are sins which only engage particular facultiesof our nature in Iheir service. Thus the love of plea-sure is chiefly seated in the senses and the imagination.While these are strongly agitated by a particular en-ticement, conscience may indeed be totally overpowered,for a season, and the person be carried along by anheadstrong irresistible impulse: But the moral facultieshave afterwards leisure to resume their influence; rea-son is again at liberty to represent the pernicious conse-quences of transgression; and experience is always athand, to convince the sinner how inconvenient and dan-gerous his forbidden pleasures are.But no such checks are ready to occur to the man iawhom the love of the world predominates. His sin is of deliberate choice, and engages the whole man in pursuitof its own ends. It is not an error about the means, it isnot seeking a right end in a mistaken way; but it is pur-suing a false and pernicious end, with care, anxiety, andself-approbation. Hence it is called in Scripture Idola-try, not from any resemblance it has to the outward actof falling down before stocks or stones, but because itentirely displaces our affections from their proper object,and leads tijem to the preference of an unjust and delu-sive rival. Hence it is asserted, by the apostle James,that " the fricndsiiip of tlie world is enmity (o God.'* Itis not merely a want of aiTection to our Maker, whichmore or less characterizes every sin ; but it is an abso-lute opposition and hatred to him, so that, in the Ian-SERMO LXXIII. ^yg

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