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RHI Volume III

RHI Volume III

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Published by RandomHouseAcademic

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Published by: RandomHouseAcademic on May 18, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/02/2013

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New Guides & Strategiesfor Teaching About &Challenging Censorship:Kimberly Horne,ReLeah Lent, and Pat Scales  Articles by Noted Authors:Maya Angelou, Judy Blume,Ray Bradbury, Billy Collins,Pat Conroy, and Lloyd Jones Contributions from: ALA Office of IntellectualFreedom, American Book-sellers Foundation forFreedom of Expression,and the National Coalition Against Censorship Reading Excerpts from New Titles
Focu On:
 
Censorship &Banned Books
IR
nc.
An Annual Magazine for Educators
 
Rndom Hou, Inc.
Vlum 3 • Issu N. 1
Inside: Banned Books CD Sampler
Includes an Interview with Judy Blume
 
 A Dangerous Utopia
by Lois Lowry
54
 About Censorship . . . In Her Own Words
by Judy Blume
56
 A Roundtable Discussion:
Shakespeare & Censorship

58 
 A Letter to the Editor o the
Charleston Gazette 
 
by Pat Conroy
62
Dangerous Words, Dangerous Ideas:
 A Prescriptionor Literature that Lasts
 
by Jon Clinch 
64
It Began With Cain:
Why Violence in Literature Cannotand Should Not Be Banned
 
by Phil LaMarche 
66
Censoring the Costs o War:
Reading
The Souvenir 
 
by Louise Steinman 
69
“Don’t throw these in the fre, Fred. They havefre in them already.”
by Ted Engelmann
73
This is Dedicated to Those Who Burn Books:
Charles Bock on himsel, Kurt Vonnegut, and allthose who get burned
 
by Charles Bock
76
Coming Ater Us
by Salman Rushdie 
80
Hester Prynne and Me
by David Ebersho                       
83
The Word,
Visualized 
 
by Siku 
86
(Not So) Funny in Farsi
by Firoozeh Dumas
90
The Censor’s Perect World
by Lloyd Jones 
92
International Writers Speak Out About Censorship
by Elizabeth Subercaseaux & Karen Connelly 
94
Book Banning:
Ouds, Oeuvres, and Oppressors
 
by Donald Friedman
96
 A Roundtable Discussion:
Journalism, Media & Technology

101
Learning (and Unlearning) the Lessons o Katrina:
SitingThrough Myths, Distortions and Suppressed Truths
 
by Jed Horne 
104
Wrestling with Joe McCarthy:
 A Historian Refects onMcCarthyism & Its Legacy
 
by Susan Grifn
108 PROFESSIONAL READING

111
Disability or Dierence?:
One Aspergian Author’s Crusade to Changethe Way We Think and Speak About Autism
 
by John Elder Robison
112
 Ask or It:
Teaching your Students— and Yoursel—to Negotiate
 
by Linda Babcock                                         
116READING EXCERPTS

119
Contents
Rain: An Original Poem
by Billy Collins 
1CONTRIBUTORS

2
Focus On:
Censorship and Banned Books
by Michael D Gentile 
5PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

7
 An Open Letter to Teachers and Librarians
by Pat Schroeder, AAP
Book Censorship 2008:
 A View rom the Trenches
 
by Joan Bertin, NCAC 
9
Celebrate your Freedom to Read During Banned Books Week 
by Judith Krug, ALA
12
Standing Up to One’s Own Neighbors:
PEN American Centeron the Greatest Struggle Against Censorship
 
by Lary Siems 
15
 An Original Comic rom Unshelved
by Bill Barnes & Gene Ambaum
18 
 Your Bookseller:
 A Friend o Free Speech
 
by Christopher MFinan, ABFFE
19
Bringing Literature to Lie:
Staging Classic Works, andConronting Authentic Language in the Modern Classroom
 
by David Kener, The American Place Theatre                   
22 TEACHER’S GUIDES

25
Does Censorship Matter?
by Pat Scales
27
The Next Battleground:
 Audiobooks and Censorship
 
by Teri SLesesne 
32
Facing Our Fears:
Integrating Challenging New Books into21st Century Curricula
 
by ReLeah Cossett Lent
35
Believe in What You Teach, Down to the Comma:
What My Experience with Censorship Taught Me About Trust,Freedom and Standing Up For What You Believe
 
by Kimberly Horne
39
Fighting or the Freedom to Read
by Erin Gruwell
42 AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT 

45
“Those Who Ban Books”
by Maya Angelou 
46
FAHRENHEIT 451—55 YEARS LATER
by Ray Bradbury 
49
Where Even Gits Are Censored
by Edwin Frank 
52
The Future Is Now:
Marketing, Censorship,and Communication
 
by Thomas Nevins 
53
RaNdom HouSE, INc
. Academic Dept., 6-2,1745 Broadway, New York, NY 10019
e-mail: highschool@randomhouse.com • 212-782-8482
Visit our website at: www.randomhouse.com/highschoolCover and Interior Designed by Timothy Shaner. Cover Image © gettyimages.com. Printed in the U.S.A.
 
On Censorship & Banned Books
RHI: Censorship & Banned Books
 
1
Rain
S
ome time ater the books had been orbidden—The one about the woman and her daughter,The one about the boy who spoke poorly—And ater the smoke rom the incinerators had cleared,It was suggested that censorship be extendedTo the plover, the wild turkey, and the common moorhen.But these birds have done nothing, a ew protested.That is precisely the problem, the loudspeakers answered.It rained that month day and night.Men with nets anned out into the eldsAnd shouted to each other along the shorelines.Teachers disappeared on the way to their cars.Then the committee came ater the morning gloryFor its suggestive urling and unurlingAnd the ligustrum and the alstroemeriaBecause they were dicult to pronounce and spell.Then the pine tree or its tricky needles and conesAnd parsley and red and yellow peppers or no reason at all.You would think the lock and the gate Would be sae, but that was well beore whispering,Shaking hands on the street,And hooking an arm around someone’s waistBecame the subjects o discussionAcross long granite tables behind dark glass doors.And the rain was constant and cold—ne daysto curl up with a good book, someone joked—but there were no more books, just the curling up o people quietly in corners and doorways,bits o straw foating down the streetsalong the curbs into the turbulent rivers and out to sea.
 An Original Pom by Billy Collins

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