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RHI Volume II

RHI Volume II

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Published by RandomHouseAcademic

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Published by: RandomHouseAcademic on May 18, 2009
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11/07/2012

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IH
 
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An Annual Magazine for Educators
 
Random House, Inc.
Volume 2 • Issue No. 1
New Teacher’sGuides: Language Arts & Social Studies Articles by Noted Authors:Daniel Goleman,Erin Gruwell,Jonathan Kozol,Sonia Nazario, &Barack ObamaInstill CriticalThinking, ResurrectRhetoric, Encourage Activism & MoreReading Excerptsfrom New Titles
Focus On:
 
Promoting Active Citizenship
Critical Literacy &Civic Responsibility
 
Contents
Cover and Interior Designed by Timothy Shaner. Cover Image © Corbis. Printed in the U.S.A.
RANDOM HOUSE, INC
. Academic Dept., 5-4, 1745 Broadway, New York, NY 10019e-mail: highschool@randomhouse.com tel.: 212-782-8482Visit our website at: www.randomhouse.com/highschool
Thoughts on the Duty and Power of Citizenship
by Barack Obama . . . . .
 
1CONTRIBUTORS
. . . . .
 
2
Focus On: Citizenship
by Michael D. Gentile . . . . .
 
5
Wild Flowers: Aesthetics in the Classroom In the Age of Uniformity Dictated By No Child Left Behind
by Jonathan Kozol . . . . .
 
7 TEACHER’S GUIDES
. . . . .
 
11
The Role of Critical Literacy in Citizenship
by Nancy Frey and Douglas Fisher . . . . .
 
13
Critical Comprehension of Social Studies Texts
by Glenn DeVoogd . . . . .
 
21
Choice and Voice: Democracy,Participation, and Critical Literacyin the English Classroom
by Barry Gilmore . . . . .
 
29
“Too Much Information!”: Tips toHelp Your Students Make the Most— And Best—of Today’s Media
by Peter Edelman . . . . .
 
38 
On Censorship
by Pat Scales . . . . .
 
39
The Constitution of the United States of America
by Nancy Schick . . . . .
 
47BUILDING THE FOUNDATION
. . . . .
 
59
Let’s Make Hypocrites!: Reclaim Five MisunderstoodWords to Build Better Citizens
by Jay Heinrichs . . . . .
 
60
Writing as Civility? Who’d Believe It?
by Arthur Plotnik . . . .
 
65
 A Roundtable Discussion: Citizenship & the Sciences
by Ian Ayres, David P. Barash, Daniel Goleman,and David Sloan Wilson . . . . .
 
68 
Teaching War: Providing a Different Perspectiveto Engage and Challenge Your Students
by Dennis Showalter . . . . .
 
73
 An Interview with MasterIllustrator, Sam Fink 
. . . . .
 
76
Why Historical Fiction Belongsin Your Classroom
by Michelle Moran . . . . .
 
80
 All Fiction Has an Agenda: Political Activism in China Miéville’s
Un Lun Dun 
and Other Great Works of Young Adult Literature
by Chris Schluep . . . . .
 
84
 Avenging Social Injustice Through Literacy: Using All-SchoolRead Selections to Educate and Motivate Your Students
by Judith Turner . . . . .
 
88 PUTTING IDEAS INTO ACTION
. . . . .
 
95
The Power of Expectation and Environment
by Bill Strickland . . . . .
 
96
Whites Rules for Action: Promoting Literacy Via Citizenship
by Paul D. White . . . . .
 
98 
 A Life Worth Fighting For: How
Enrique’s Journey 
 Teaches Students to Be Grateful and Aware ofThe Privilege of U.S. Citizenship
by Sonia Nazario . . . . .
 
102
Life Lessons: Q&A from Erin Gruwell,the Freedom Writers’ Courageous Teacher
. . . . .
 
107
Think Globally, Act Locally: Getting Your Studentsto Become Good Citizens of Earth
by Nathaniel Tripp . . . . .
 
108 
Going Green:
The Green Book 
Shows How toSave the Planet, One Simple Step at a Time
by Elizabeth Rogers and Thomas M. Kostigen . . . . .
 
112
Saving the Village: How Dungeons & Dragons
®
 Teaches the Lessons of Citizenship
by Wizards of the Coast . . . . .
 
116
Rockin’ the Vote: The Millennial Generation Gets A Say
. . .
 
118 READING EXCERPTS
. . . . .
 
121
1124776
© Sam Fink
 
Thoughts on the Duty and Power of Citizenship
RHI: Promoting Active Citizenship
 
1
Dear Educator,
T
he American stories that move us start with ordinary people who are compelled to change their country: agroup of shopkeepers and blacksmiths who met at Liberty Trees to overthrow an empire; a young lawyer fromSpringfield who saved the Union and freed a people; a group of women who said, “I’m as smart as he is, so Ishould vote,” and revised the Constitution; a seamstress who refused to move and thus launched the civil rightsmovement. Today, many young people who love their country are givingup their summer vacations and spring breaks to help rebuild towns dev-astated by Hurricane Katrina.In America, change doesn’t start in Washington, DC; ordinary citi-zens bring it to Washington, DC. This is what I have learned in my ownlife—lasting change starts from the bottom, not the top. When I was twenty-three years old, I got this crazy idea that I wantedto be a community organizer. It was an idea that came from the storiesmy mother and my grandparents would tellme about the civil rights movement—stories about young people sitting at lunch counters, riding on buses, and marchingfor freedom. I thought that this could be my way to help fight the injustices and theinequalities that still exist in our country.I wrote letters to every organization in the country, and finally a small groupof churches in Chicago gave me a job organizing neighborhoods devastated bysteel-plant closings in the early 1980s. The churches paid me just $12,000 a yearplus $1,000 to buy a beat-up car.I spent weeks organizing our very first community meeting about gang vio-lence. We invited the police. We made phone calls, went to churches, and passedout flyers. The night of the meeting, we arranged rows and rows of chairs. Wewaited. Then a group of older people walked into the hall, and an old ladyasked, “Is this where the bingo game is?”The meeting was a disaster, and the volunteers were ready to quit. Ilooked outside and saw some young boys playing in a vacant lot, tossingstones at a boarded-up apartment building. I turned to the volunteers, and Isaid to them, “Before you quit, I want you to answer one question. Who willfight for those boys if not us? Who will give them a fair shot if we leave?” We didn’t reach every child, but we did help some.The American story shows us that citizens are the catalyst for change.These are ordinary people who long for something better. Every day, thisis the power that you as teachers hold in the classroom. You have theresponsibility and privilege of guiding our young people to understandthat challenges are met and injustices overcome because citizens just likethem are standing up and demanding change. If you inspire them toact, then America will be transformed for the better, and the role of citizen will remain the most important political office in America.This is what we can teach our young people together. Let’sturn the page and begin.
The most important political offi ce is that of private citizen.
—Justice Louis Brandeis
 
BARACK OBAMA is a U.S. Senator from Illinois and theauthor of 
The Audacity of Hope
and
Dreams from My Father
.
   P   h  o   t  o  g  r  a  p   h   ©    D  e   b  o  r  a   h   F  e   i  n  g  o   l   d

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