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Gargantua and Pantagruel

Gargantua and Pantagruel

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Published by technoterri
Guttenberg Press publication

The Life of Gargantua and of Pantagruel (in French, La vie de Gargantua et de Pantagruel) is a connected series of five novels written in the 16th century by François Rabelais. It is the story of two giants, a father (Gargantua) and his son (Pantagruel) and their adventures, written in an amusing, extravagant, satirical vein. There is much crudity and scatological humor as well as a large amount of violence. Long lists of vulgar insults fill several chapters.
Guttenberg Press publication

The Life of Gargantua and of Pantagruel (in French, La vie de Gargantua et de Pantagruel) is a connected series of five novels written in the 16th century by François Rabelais. It is the story of two giants, a father (Gargantua) and his son (Pantagruel) and their adventures, written in an amusing, extravagant, satirical vein. There is much crudity and scatological humor as well as a large amount of violence. Long lists of vulgar insults fill several chapters.

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Published by: technoterri on May 20, 2009
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Project Gutenberg's Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete., by Francois RabelaisThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete.Five Books Of The Lives, Heroic Deeds And Sayings Of Gargantua AndHis Son Pantagruel Author: Francois RabelaisRelease Date: August 8, 2004 [EBook #1200]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ASCII*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GARGANTUA AND PANTAGRUEL, ***Produced by Sue Asscher and David WidgerMASTER FRANCIS RABELAISFIVE BOOKS OF THE LIVES, HEROIC DEEDS AND SAYINGS OFGARGANTUA AND HIS SON PANTAGRUELTranslated into English bySir Thomas Urquhart of CromartyandPeter Antony MotteuxThe text of the first Two Books of Rabelais has been reprinted from thefirst edition (1653) of Urquhart's translation. Footnotes initialled 'M.'are drawn from the Maitland Club edition (1838); other footnotes are by thetranslator. Urquhart's translation of Book III. appeared posthumously in1693, with a new edition of Books I. and II., under Motteux's editorship.Motteux's rendering of Books IV. and V. followed in 1708. Occasionally (as
 
the footnotes indicate) passages omitted by Motteux have been restored fromthe 1738 copy edited by Ozell.CONTENTS.IntroductionTHE FIRST BOOK.J. De la Salle, to the Honoured, Noble Translator of Rabelais.RablophilaThe Author's Prologue to the First BookRabelais to the ReaderChapter 1.I.--Of the Genealogy and Antiquity of GargantuaChapter 1.II.--The Antidoted Fanfreluches: or, a Galimatia of extravagantConceits found in an ancient MonumentChapter 1.III.--How Gargantua was carried eleven months in his mother'sbellyChapter 1.IV.--How Gargamelle, being great with Gargantua, did eat a hugedeal of tripesChapter 1.V.--The Discourse of the DrinkersChapter 1.VI.--How Gargantua was born in a strange mannerChapter 1.VII.--After what manner Gargantua had his name given him, and howhe tippled, bibbed, and curried the canChapter 1.VIII.--How they apparelled GargantuaChapter 1.IX.--The colours and liveries of GargantuaChapter 1.X.--Of that which is signified by the colours white and blueChapter 1.XI.--Of the youthful age of GargantuaChapter 1.XII.--Of Gargantua's wooden horsesChapter 1.XIII.--How Gargantua's wonderful understanding became known tohis father Grangousier, by the invention of a torchecul or wipebreechChapter 1.XIV.--How Gargantua was taught Latin by a SophisterChapter 1.XV.--How Gargantua was put under other schoolmastersChapter 1.XVI.--How Gargantua was sent to Paris, and of the huge great marethat he rode on; how she destroyed the oxflies of the BeauceChapter 1.XVII.--How Gargantua paid his welcome to the Parisians, and how
 
he took away the great bells of Our Lady's ChurchChapter 1.XVIII.--How Janotus de Bragmardo was sent to Gargantua to recoverthe great bellsChapter 1.XIX.--The oration of Master Janotus de Bragmardo for recovery ofthe bellsChapter 1.XX.--How the Sophister carried away his cloth, and how he had asuit in law against the other mastersChapter 1.XXI.--The study of Gargantua, according to the discipline of hisschoolmasters the SophistersChapter 1.XXII.--The games of GargantuaChapter 1.XXIII.--How Gargantua was instructed by Ponocrates, and in suchsort disciplinated, that he lost not one hour of the dayChapter 1.XXIV.--How Gargantua spent his time in rainy weatherChapter 1.XXV.--How there was great strife and debate raised betwixt thecake-bakers of Lerne, and those of Gargantua's country, whereupon werewaged great warsChapter 1.XXVI.--How the inhabitants of Lerne, by the commandment ofPicrochole their king, assaulted the shepherds of Gargantua unexpectedlyand on a suddenChapter 1.XXVII.--How a monk of Seville saved the close of the abbey frombeing ransacked by the enemyChapter 1.XXVIII.--How Picrochole stormed and took by assault the rockClermond, and of Grangousier's unwillingness and aversion from theundertaking of warChapter 1.XXIX.--The tenour of the letter which Grangousier wrote to hisson GargantuaChapter 1.XXX.--How Ulric Gallet was sent unto PicrocholeChapter 1.XXXI.--The speech made by Gallet to PicrocholeChapter 1.XXXII.--How Grangousier, to buy peace, caused the cakes to berestoredChapter 1.XXXIII.--How some statesmen of Picrochole, by hairbrainedcounsel, put him in extreme dangerChapter 1.XXXIV.--How Gargantua left the city of Paris to succour hiscountry, and how Gymnast encountered with the enemyChapter 1.XXXV.--How Gymnast very souply and cunningly killed CaptainTripet and others of Picrochole's menChapter 1.XXXVI.--How Gargantua demolished the castle at the ford of Vede,and how they passed the ford

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