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Mikwendaagoziwag - Memorial at Sandy Lake. Mikwendaagoziwag in Ojibwe means: We remember them.

Mikwendaagoziwag - Memorial at Sandy Lake. Mikwendaagoziwag in Ojibwe means: We remember them.

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Mikwendaagoziwag - Memorial at Sandy Lake
One hundred and fifty years after the Sandy Lake tragedy, the descendants of the 1850 annuity bands gathered to dedicate a memorial to those who suffered and died. Perched on a glacial mound overlooking Sandy Lake,
the Mikwendaagoziwag Memorial is situated near the resting places of the Ojibwe of 1850. The memorial stands as a tribute and invites visitors to reflect on the past.

The following 12 tribes, as modern–day successors to the 1850 annuity bands, helped to design and fund the memorial:

Mikwendaagoziwag in Ojibwe means:
We remember them.
Mikwendaagoziwag - Memorial at Sandy Lake
One hundred and fifty years after the Sandy Lake tragedy, the descendants of the 1850 annuity bands gathered to dedicate a memorial to those who suffered and died. Perched on a glacial mound overlooking Sandy Lake,
the Mikwendaagoziwag Memorial is situated near the resting places of the Ojibwe of 1850. The memorial stands as a tribute and invites visitors to reflect on the past.

The following 12 tribes, as modern–day successors to the 1850 annuity bands, helped to design and fund the memorial:

Mikwendaagoziwag in Ojibwe means:
We remember them.

More info:

Published by: Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson on Jul 27, 2013
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 Timber, Minerals, and Treaties
Recognizing indigenous bands as sovereign nations inMinnesota, Wisconsin, and Upper Michigan, theUnited States made treaties with the Ojibwe (Chippewa)of the Lake Superior region to gain access to the landand the natural resources.Dominated by massive pine forests, wetlands, andrugged terrain, there was little interest from whiteAmericans in settling this region. United States lead-ers, however, sought raw materials like timber, copper,and iron ore to fuel western expansion and engagedIndian leaders to push for land acquisitions.In 1837, Ojibwe chiefs and government officials metnear present-day St. Paul, resulting in the sale, or ces-sion, of 13 million acres in east-central Minnesota andnorthern Wisconsin. The transaction was contingenton the Ojibwe retaining rights to hunt, fish, and gatheron the newly ceded territory. These reserved rights arecommonly called "treaty rights." An additional provi-sion to the treaty required the United States to makeannual payments called annuities to band members for25 years. Annuity payments generally included cash,food, and everyday utility items.Five years later, Ojibwe headmen and government rep-resentatives agreed upon a 10-million-acre land cessionthat included portions of northern Wisconsin and UpperMichigan. The treaty opened the south shore of LakeSuperior to lumberjacks, along with iron and copper min-ers. Similar to the previous 1837 arrangement, the 1842Treaty guaranteed the Ojibwe's hunting, fishing andgathering rights and promised annuity distributions.
 Attempted Removal to Minnesota
Most Wisconsin and Upper Michigan Ojibwe bandswhich negotiated the 1837 and 1842 Treaties receivedtheir annuities by early autumn at La Pointe on Made-line Island–a cultural and spiritual center for Ojibwepeople. Some government officials in the MinnesotaTerritory, however, wanted the distribution site movedout of Wisconsin in order to reap the economic benefitsof a large, concentrated Indian population.Territorial Governor and Superintendent of IndianAffairs in Minnesota, Alexander Ramsey, worked withother officials to remove the Ojibwe from their homesin Wisconsin and Upper Michigan to Sandy Lake,known to the Ojibwe as Gaamiitawangagaamag. Theflow of annuity money and government aid to buildIndian schools, agencies, and farms would create wealthfor Ramsey and his supporters in Minnesota.Pressured by Ramsey and others, United States Pres-ident Zachary Taylor issued an executive order in Febru-ary 1850 that sought to move Ojibwe Indians living eastof the Mississippi River to their unceded lands. Initiallystunned by the breach of the 1837 and 1842 Treatyterms, Ojibwe leaders recognized that the removal orderclearly violated their agreement with the United States.Soon, a broad coalition of supporters–missionarygroups, newspapers, businessmen, and Wisconsin statelegislators–rallied to oppose the removal effort, andband members refused to abandon their homes.
 Mikwendaagoziwag  Memorial at Sandy Lake
One hundred and fifty years after the Sandy Laketragedy, the descendants of the 1850 annuity bands gath-ered to dedicate a memorial to those who suffered anddied. Perched on a glacial mound overlooking Sandy Lake,the Mikwendaagoziwag Memorial is situated near the rest-ing places of the Ojibwe of 1850. The memorial stands asa tribute and invites visitors to reflect on the past.The following 12 tribes, as modern–day successors tothe 1850 annuity bands, helped to design and fund thememorial:
 Minnesota
Fond du Lac BandGrand Portage BandLeech Lake BandMille Lacs Band
 Michigan
Keweenaw Bay IndianCommunityLac Vieux Desert Band
 Wisconsin
Bad River BandLac Courte OreillesBandLac du Flambeau BandRed Cliff BandSt. Croix BandSokaogon Band
Annuity payment at Sandy Lake Indian Sub-Agency, 1850.
 Mikwendaagoziwag in Ojibwe means:
We remember them.
Ojibwe land ceded to the United States through the treaties of 1837, 1842 and 1854.
For more information contact GLIFWC: P.O. Box 9 Odanah, WI 54861 Phone: 715-682-6619 E-mail: pio@glifwc.org Web site: www.glifwc.org 

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