Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
13Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Gandhi and South Africa, 1914-48, edited by E. S. Reddy and Gopalkrishna Gandhi

Gandhi and South Africa, 1914-48, edited by E. S. Reddy and Gopalkrishna Gandhi

Ratings:

5.0

(1)
|Views: 598 |Likes:
Published by Enuga S. Reddy
Collection of articles, letters and interviews of Gandhi relating to South Africa from the time he left South Africa in 1914 until his assassination in 1948. This shows his abiding interest in the situation in South Africa and his concern for the elimination of racist oppression in that country.
Collection of articles, letters and interviews of Gandhi relating to South Africa from the time he left South Africa in 1914 until his assassination in 1948. This shows his abiding interest in the situation in South Africa and his concern for the elimination of racist oppression in that country.

More info:

Published by: Enuga S. Reddy on May 20, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/11/2014

pdf

text

original

 
GANDHI AND SOUTH AFRICA1914-1948
 Edited by E.S. ReddyGopalkrishna Gandhi
NAVAJIVAN PUBLISHING HOUSEAhmedabad - 380,0141993
 
FOREWORD
I feel greatly honoured to be asked to write a Foreword to this book. It appears atprecisely the right moment in the history of the struggle against the institutionalisedracism known as ‘apartheid.’ For only now, after nearly a century of oppression by thewhite minority governments of South Africa and after forty-five years of racist legislationby the National Party, has the process of negotiation to end ‘apartheid’ begun.One of the reasons why it has been so difficult to mobilise internationalopposition to this vicious and evil system based on racism is the lack of any historicalperspective against which to judge it. It is as if the sudden "U-turn" (I refuse to call it aconversion) of President de Klerk and his party were simply due to a pragmatic andrealistic political decision: a decision based on the obvious fact that South Africa couldnot re-enter the open market of the world community whilst still practising and upholdinga racist ideology. So, to gain essential investment and development capital, `apartheid'must be ended. The world has been only too ready to interpret all this as a proof of thehighmindedness of President de Klerk and the rightness of the policies of those Westernpowers - particularly Great Britain - who have consistently opposed the imposition of economic, cultural and sporting sanctions on South Africa as the one non-violent meansof ending ‘apartheid.’It is only a truly historical perspective that can put things straight. And in thisimmensely important book Enuga Reddy and Gopal Gandhi have put us all in their debt.Here for the first time the true significance of Mohandas Gandhi's sojourn in SouthAfrica has been spelt out. And it is urgent that, at this present time of negotiation for atruly democratic, non-racist society based on human rights and human dignity, Gandhiji'scontribution should be recognised and honoured.How many people in the western world even know that he spent twenty-one yearsin South Africa? That it was in these years that Gandhiji's concept and technique of non-violent defiance originated? That, as far back as 1906 he decided to defy the humiliatingAsiatic Ordinance, whatever the consequences? But, even more significant is the way inwhich that concept of non-violent resistance to tyranny (in whatever form) has influencedthe struggle for freedom across the face of the earth. We have seen it in the civil rightsmovements, the defiance campaigns, the non-violent rebellion in Eastern Europe - inCzechoslovakia, East Germany and the Soviet Union itself. But most of all, I would dareto affirm, we have seen it in the long years of struggle in South Africa itself. And of thisI can speak with some authority since, from 1943 till the present moment, I have beeninvolved in the Anti-Apartheid Movement. Until 1956, when I became a most reluctantexile, I was directly participating in that non-violent struggle. I was present at amomentous gathering, known as ‘The Congress of the People’ at Kliptown, just outsideJohannesburg, in 1955. It was there that, clause by clause, the Freedom Charter waspassed and has been ever since the basic political and philosophical and ethical documentof the African National Congress. Like the choice of the word ‘Congress’ the essence of the Freedom Charter is Gandhian. Similarly, in the struggle for liberation itself, non-

Activity (13)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
sizweh liked this
madhavi405 liked this
Neilji liked this
olur61 liked this
myselfhussain liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->