Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
IMMIGRATION REFORM FAQ - The Toughest Questions, By Immigration Policy Center, Distributed by NaFFAA, July 29, 2013

IMMIGRATION REFORM FAQ - The Toughest Questions, By Immigration Policy Center, Distributed by NaFFAA, July 29, 2013

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2,447 |Likes:
Published by Lorna Dietz
The shortened URL of this document is http://bit.ly/immigrationreformquestions

From the Immigration Policy Center
Distributed by the National Federation of Filipino American Associations (NaFFAA)
For more information, contact JON MELEGRITO
Phone: (202) 361-0296
Email: JDMelegrito@gmail.com
http://NaFFAA-National.org


NaFFAA National Office
1322 18th St NW Washington DC 20036-1803

The National Federation of Filipino American Associations (NaFFAA) is a private, non-profit, non-partisan tax-exempt organization established in 1997 to promote the active participation of Filipino Americans in civic and national affairs. NaFFAA is composed of 12 regions with a national office in Washington, D.C. that monitors legislation and public policy issues affecting Filipino Americans. NaFFAA partners with local affiliate organizations and national coalitions in advocating for issues of common concern.

Tackling the Toughest Questions on Immigration Reform:
Short Answers to the Most Common Questions

July 29, 1013
Washington D.C. - Congress will shortly head home to town halls and constituent meetings, where immigration is sure to be one of the top issues on the table. Throughout 2013, immigration reform has captured public attention. Millions of people followed S. 744 as it worked its way through committee and watched as the Senate voted 68 to 32 to pass a comprehensive immigration reform plan. In the next few months, immigration reform will be high on the list of priorities in the House of Representatives. Despite significant public support for immigration reform among members of the public in both parties, many of the most basic facts about immigrants and immigration remain misunderstood. Debunking the myths about immigration and providing short, concise answers to the often complex issues raised by the immigration debate is a challenge. Today, the Immigration Policy Center releases a guide to some of the toughest questions on immigration, providing answers that reflect the best research and analysis available on topics ranging from the economy to crime to legalization.
[1]Throughout 2013, immigration reform has captured public attention. Millions of people followed S. 744 as it worked its way through committee and watched as the Senate voted 68 to 32 to pass a comprehensive immigration reform plan. In the next few months, immigration reform will be high on the list of priorities in the House of Representatives. Despite significant public support for immigration reform among members of the public in both parties, many of the most basic facts about immigrants and immigration remain misunderstood. Debunking the myths about immigration and providing short, concise answers to the often complex issues raised by the immigration debate is a challenge. Smart, thoughtful answers often take longer than the sound bites and quick retorts that the media demands today. The staff of the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has prepared this Q&A Guide to help you get to the heart of the toughest questions on immigration. While we’ve included succinct answers to many immigration questions, more in-depth analysis, fact sheets, and data can be found on our website, www.immigrationpolicy.org [2].
The shortened URL of this document is http://bit.ly/immigrationreformquestions

From the Immigration Policy Center
Distributed by the National Federation of Filipino American Associations (NaFFAA)
For more information, contact JON MELEGRITO
Phone: (202) 361-0296
Email: JDMelegrito@gmail.com
http://NaFFAA-National.org


NaFFAA National Office
1322 18th St NW Washington DC 20036-1803

The National Federation of Filipino American Associations (NaFFAA) is a private, non-profit, non-partisan tax-exempt organization established in 1997 to promote the active participation of Filipino Americans in civic and national affairs. NaFFAA is composed of 12 regions with a national office in Washington, D.C. that monitors legislation and public policy issues affecting Filipino Americans. NaFFAA partners with local affiliate organizations and national coalitions in advocating for issues of common concern.

Tackling the Toughest Questions on Immigration Reform:
Short Answers to the Most Common Questions

July 29, 1013
Washington D.C. - Congress will shortly head home to town halls and constituent meetings, where immigration is sure to be one of the top issues on the table. Throughout 2013, immigration reform has captured public attention. Millions of people followed S. 744 as it worked its way through committee and watched as the Senate voted 68 to 32 to pass a comprehensive immigration reform plan. In the next few months, immigration reform will be high on the list of priorities in the House of Representatives. Despite significant public support for immigration reform among members of the public in both parties, many of the most basic facts about immigrants and immigration remain misunderstood. Debunking the myths about immigration and providing short, concise answers to the often complex issues raised by the immigration debate is a challenge. Today, the Immigration Policy Center releases a guide to some of the toughest questions on immigration, providing answers that reflect the best research and analysis available on topics ranging from the economy to crime to legalization.
[1]Throughout 2013, immigration reform has captured public attention. Millions of people followed S. 744 as it worked its way through committee and watched as the Senate voted 68 to 32 to pass a comprehensive immigration reform plan. In the next few months, immigration reform will be high on the list of priorities in the House of Representatives. Despite significant public support for immigration reform among members of the public in both parties, many of the most basic facts about immigrants and immigration remain misunderstood. Debunking the myths about immigration and providing short, concise answers to the often complex issues raised by the immigration debate is a challenge. Smart, thoughtful answers often take longer than the sound bites and quick retorts that the media demands today. The staff of the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has prepared this Q&A Guide to help you get to the heart of the toughest questions on immigration. While we’ve included succinct answers to many immigration questions, more in-depth analysis, fact sheets, and data can be found on our website, www.immigrationpolicy.org [2].

More info:

Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Lorna Dietz on Jul 30, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/08/2014

pdf

text

original

 
 Tackling the Toughest Questionson Immigration Reform
Tackling the Toughest Questions on Immigration Reform:Short Answers to the Most Common QuestionsJuly 29, 1013
 
Washington D.C
. - Congress will shortly head home to town halls and constituent meetings, whereimmigration is sure to be one of the top issues on the table. Throughout 2013, immigration reform hascaptured public attention. Millions of people followed S. 744 as it worked its way through committeeand watched as the Senate voted 68 to 32 to pass a comprehensive immigration reform plan. In thenext few months, immigration reform will be high on the list of priorities in the House of Representatives. Despite significant public support for immigration reform among members of thepublic in both parties, many of the most basic facts about immigrants and immigration remainmisunderstood. Debunking the myths about immigration and providing short, concise answers to theoften complex issues raised by the immigration debate is a challenge. Today, the Immigration PolicyCenter releases a guide to some of the toughest questions on immigration, providing answers thatreflect the best research and analysis available on topics ranging from the economy to crime tolegalization.
 
[1]
Throughout 2013, immigration reform has captured public attention. Millions of people followed S.744 as it worked its way through committee and watched as the Senate voted 68 to 32 to pass acomprehensive immigration reform plan. In the next few months, immigration reform will be high onthe list of priorities in the House of Representatives. Despite significant public support for immigrationreform among members of the public in both parties, many of the most basic facts about immigrantsand immigration remain misunderstood. Debunking the myths about immigration and providing short,concise answers to the often complex issues raised by the immigration debate is a challenge. Smart,thoughtful answers often take longer than the sound bites and quick retorts that the media demandstoday. The staff of the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has prepared this Q&A Guide to help you getto the heart of the toughest questi
ons on immigration. While we’ve included succinct answers to many
immigration questions, more in-depth analysis, fact sheets, and data can be found on our website,www.immigrationpolicy.org
[2]
.
 
I. The Importance of Immigration ReformQ:
Why do we need Immigration Reform? 
 
A:
Immigration reform is part of the solution for creating a stronger, more successful, and unifiednation. America is a nation of immigrants, and welcoming immigrants reflects the key values on whichthis country is based: hard work, perseverance, taking on challenges, demonstrating individuality, andshowing compassion. In addition, immigration reform is a bipartisan issue where everyone can agreethat a working immigration system contributes to a stronger country
economically, socially, andculturally. Anti-immigrant pundits often downplay the importance of immigration to
 America’s future,
treating immigrants and immigration as a threat. While there are plenty of legitimate issues toquestion and debate in immigration policy, choosing to use the topic as a wedge issue, stirring up fear and uncertainty, hoping to pit people against each other, is not only unproductive, but damaging toour civic life.The facts make it clear that reform of our immigration system can benefit everyone. We must ensurethat we have a legal immigration system that works, which will make it far easier to enforce our laws,protect our borders, and provide the people and ideas we need to thrive in the 21
st
century.
Q:
Why allow unauthorized immigrants to becom
U.S. Citizens? Isn’t legal status enough? 
 
A:
The integration of the11 million
[3]
unauthorized immigrants now living in the United States into fullcitizenship is not only good for those individuals, but the country as a whole. Citizenship, and thequest for citizenship, facilitates integration in myriad ways that legal status alone does not. Fromlearning English and U.S. civics to earning higher incomes, serving jury duty, and voting in elections,citizens and would-be citizens benefit from a deeper form of incorporation into U.S. society than dolegal immigrants who have no hope of ever applying for naturalization. As the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reformwrote
[4]
in a report to Congress in 1997,
“Na
turalization is the most important act that a legal immigrant undertakes in the process of becomingan American. Taking this step confers upon the immigrant all the rights and responsibilities of civicand political participation that the
United States has to offer.” Any sort of legal status which precludes
the right to apply for naturalization would define the newly legalized population as permanently
“separate and unequal,” to the detriment of the immigrants themselves and
U.S. society as a whole.Moreover, numerous polls have shown that a majority of Americans support a path to citizenship. Infact, once Americans overwhelmingly began to reject the idea that unauthorized immigrants shouldnot be allowed to become legal residents, the issue of citizenship became a straw man. In thiscountry, lawful permanent residence implies a pathway to citizenship, and citizenship is essential to American identity.
Q:
Why can’t the states just handle immigration
?
 
A:
In 2012,
 
[5]
struck down three provisions of Arizona SB 1070, the most famousof the recent state immigration-control laws, and left a fourth open to future legal challenge. In theprocess, the Court confirmed that states cannot enact their own immigration policies, and may notempower their law-enforcement officers to make immigration arrests unless specifically authorized byCongress. State immigration-cont
rol laws are ineffective and can’t change the federal system. As the
Supreme Court made clear, only the federal government can reform our immigration laws.Stateimmigration-control laws
[6]
are expensive, devote precious law-enforcement resources to questioningimmigrants about their status, and divert law-enforcement resources away from investigating seriouscriminal activity. SB 1070-like laws can also lead to racial profiling and discriminatory behavior. Police
 
already have the ability to arrest immigrants for state crimes they may commit, and they already cancooperate with the federal government to enforce immigration laws.
II. The Most Visible Symptom of a Broken System: Unauthorized ImmigrantsQ:
What can be done about unauthorized immigration? 
 
A:
Unauthorized immigration as we know it will only end when we change the way we think about our immigration system as a whole. A public policy that seeks to end unauthorized immigration mustunderstand the reasons it occurs in the first place. While enforcement plays a role in reducingunauthorized immigration, the deciding factors are often based on economic need, family unity, or fear of persecution, which will never be fully addressed through enforcement-only measures. Instead,reducing unauthorized immigration turns on increasing the number of visas available for employmentand family members
—numbers that haven’t changed since 1990. It also requires addressing the
roughly 11 million people living unlawfully in the United States,more than 60%
[3]
of whom have beenin the U.S. more than a decade. Creating a roadmap to legalization that acknowledges the integralrole many of these immigrants play in our communities is key. Millions of U.S.-citizen children andfamily members risk separation from deported loved ones, and the country cannot afford to deport 11million people. This requires lawmakers to focus on fair ways to bring those who have residedunlawfully in this country for years into full legal participation in their adopted home, which is the onlything separating them from truly being American.
Q:
Most undocumented immigrants just got here, didn’t they? 
 
A:
Most unauthorized immigrants are integrated members of U.S. families and communities.Nationwide, unauthorized immigrants comprise5.2% of the workforce
[7]
, and in states like Arizona,the unauthorized share of the workforce is even higher. In certain sectors, like agriculture andconstruction, unauthorized workers comprise up to 25% of the workforce. Nationwide, there areapproximately4.5 million U.S.-citizen children
[8]
with at least one unauthorized parent, and policiesthat target their parents have grave effects on the children.Approximately three-fifths (61%)
[9]
of unauthorized immigrants have been in the U.S. 10 years or more.
Q:
What part of illegal don’t you understand? 
Some people can’t get past the fact that persons living unlawfully in the
United States are herewithout authorization. They broke the law, and the assumption is that only by being deported willthings be made fair again. At the same time, most people acknowledge that the country could notafford to deport 11 million people, given not only the costs of enforcement of a mass deportationscheme, but also the costs to the economy and our communities if millions of workers were deportedand families were separated. Proposals for legalization attempt to balance past violations of law withthe economic and social realities of the day. If we truly want to fix our broken immigration system, we
have to impose reasonable penalties that don’t undermine the country as a whole.
 
Q:
 Aren’t you a criminal just by being here illegally? 
 
A:
Most immigration vio
lations are civil in nature and don’t result in criminal prosecution. Even thecriminal charges that are sometimes used, such as “improper entry by alien” (entering the
UnitedStates without authorization), are generally misdemeanors. These charges have increased in recentyears in border communities where the government has made a strategic decision to use the criminalcourts rather than the civil immigration courts to reduce illegal immigration. Irrespective of the charge,the act of unlawful immigration itself does not pose a threat to public safety, unlike crimes such asmurder, assault, and robbery, all of which immigrants are much less likely to commit than natives.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->