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Table Of Contents

CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
CHAPTER XII
CHAPTER XIII
CHAPTER XIV
CHAPTER XV
P. 1
Behind the Scenes, or, Thirty Years a Slave, And Four Years in the White House

Behind the Scenes, or, Thirty Years a Slave, And Four Years in the White House

Ratings:

3.77

(33)
|Views: 8,443|Likes:
Published by Wildside Press
An autobiographical narrative, BEHIND THE SCENES traces Elizabeth Keckley's life from her enslavement in Virginia and North Carolina to her time as seamstress to Mary Todd Lincoln in the White House during Abraham Lincoln's administration. It was quite controversial at the time of its release--an uncompromising work that transgressed Victorian boundaries between public and private life, and lines of race, gender, and society.
An autobiographical narrative, BEHIND THE SCENES traces Elizabeth Keckley's life from her enslavement in Virginia and North Carolina to her time as seamstress to Mary Todd Lincoln in the White House during Abraham Lincoln's administration. It was quite controversial at the time of its release--an uncompromising work that transgressed Victorian boundaries between public and private life, and lines of race, gender, and society.

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Publish date: Jul 29, 2013
Added to Scribd: Jul 30, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781479408702
List Price: $0.99

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04/20/2014

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9781479408702

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citizenjoyce reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Elizabeth Keckley gives us an interesting look at life in US in the 1800's, the politics of the time and her relationship with the people of the era. There's a little snapshot of Fredrick Douglas and a larger analysis of Mary Todd Lincoln in which the reader is both annoyed with the frippery of the president's wife and dismayed at her treatment. Perhaps the most amazing aspect was Keckley's statement that there was both a bad and good aspect to the practice of slavery. Keckley details her beatings and the selling off of family from each other, also the fact that she was "interfered with" by a white man who fathered her only child. But she professed profound love for her former masters, the ones whom she supported with her sewing and who would not grant freedom to herself and her son until she managed to pay them $1200. She says people don't understand how a former slave can have fond memories of her days in servitude but that people always remember the days of childhood with fond nostalgia, even when those days involve slavery. This book left me wanting to know more and with the utmost respect for the ambition and accomplishments of its author.
ostrom_2 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Keckley worked for the Lincoln family in the White House. She was an expert seamstress. The novel adheres to some melodramatic conventions of the time but is nonetheless fascinating.
estamm_4 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
The book starts with a short life-story of the author, a former slave who bought her own freedom. She became well-known as a seamstress and went to work for Mary Lincoln. There are many recollections in this book that are well known in Lincoln-lore, but they originated in this book. Thus, as an original source, this is a must read. First editions are essentially non-existent, so be satisfied with any modern copy.
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