Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Ch6-Canada in the Post-war.pdf

Ch6-Canada in the Post-war.pdf

Ratings: (0)|Views: 362 |Likes:
Published by Senorita Brewster
Chapter 6 Notes
Chapter 6 Notes

More info:

Published by: Senorita Brewster on Jul 31, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/05/2014

pdf

text

original

 
 1
SS 11: NOTES FROM COUNTERPOINTS
MRS. KAUSHAL
CH. 6: CANADA IN THE POST-WAR WORLD
 
INTRODUCTION
 1. Igor Gouzenko, a Russian clerk at the Soviet embassy in Ottawa, haddefected from the Soviet Union to Canada.2. 1945 Gouzenko took documents that proved that a Soviet spy ring wasoperating within the Canadian government to the
Ottawa Journal
 newspaper and to the offices of the RCMP, the department of justice, andthe prime minister, but no one paid attention.3. Only when Soviet agents broke into Gouzenko’s apartment did the Ottawapolice finally listen to his story. Shocked Canadian officials secretlyinformed the British and U.S. governments that a Soviet spy ring had beenoperating in Canada.4. 1946 – the RCMP rounded up several people suspected of being Sovietspies. The suspects were kept in isolation, without charge, and withoutlegal counsel. Eventually 18 people were brought to trial; 8 were foundguilty and imprisoned.5. The spy ring was likely trying to discover the secrets of the atomic bomb.6. During WW II, the U.S. and the Soviet Union had been allies, but had littlein common except for their opposition to the Axis powers. Once the warwas over, tensions grew and the 2 powers were soon openly hostiletowards each other, though they were careful not to start a new war.Instead, they used
espionage
(spies) and helped their allies in “little wars”and revolutions.7. Both East and West built stockpiles of conventional arms, powerful nuclearweapons, biological and chemical weapons, long-range bombers, missiles,and atomic submarines.
 
 2
THE COLD WAR BEGINS
 1. The military strength of the Soviet Union and the U.S. made them
superpowers
, each capable of inflicting massive destruction. They did notfight a direct war because they knew that would mean nuclear annihilation(complete destruction).2. Instead, they competed for political influence in other parts of the world,especially in developing nations that were poorer and less politically stablethan themselves. This rivalry was called the
Cold Wa
because it did noterupt into an open (hot) war. It lasted over 40 years.3. The roots of the Cold War lay in the differing views these 2 countries hadon political and economic systems.
¾
The Soviet Union was communist; the government controlled all industryand business; no political opposition was tolerated.
¾
the U.S. and most Western countries were capitalist. Their economieswere based on private enterprise, with individuals investing in businessfor profit. Citizens had basic freedoms such as a free press and freedomof speech.4. Western countries feared that communists aimed to overthrow Westernsocieties in a world revolution.5. The Soviet Union believed that the Western countries might try to invadeSoviet territory throughout Europe, particularly through East Germany.6. To create a buffer between the USSR and Western Europe, the Sovietstook over the countries of Eastern Europe and established communistgovernments there. Then communists took over China in 1949, and theformer government fled to Taiwan.7. The U.S. Congress established a Committee on Un-American Activities,chaired by Senator Joseph McCarthy, who terrified the nation with secretlists of supposed communists in government, universities, theentertainment industry, and even the Girl Scouts. Anyone suspected of being a communist could be persecuted, fired, and blacklisted (preventedfrom finding another job).
 
 3
The Cold War at Home
 1. 1949 the leader of the Conservative Party tried to make the spread of communism, or the
red menace”
– the term used to describe the Sovietsan issue. He accused the government of keeping communists in the civilservice.2. Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent refused to outlaw communism, stating thatthis was a tactic of dictatorships, not democracies.3. Union leaders who fought for better conditions for workers came undersuspicion of being communists. Defence industries secretly sent lists of their employees to Ottawa for screening. Workers suspected of communistsympathies found themselves dismissed for no apparent reason.4. In Quebec, Premier Maurice Duplessis took a strong stand againstcommunism.
¾
Police raided offices and private homes searching for “revolutionary”material.
¾
The
Padlock Law
was used to shut down suspected organizations andnewspapers.
¾
When a poorly constructed bridge collapsed in Trois-Rivieres in 1951,Duplessis blamed communist sabotage.
NATO AND THE WARSAW PACT
 1. 1949 – Canada, the U.S., Britain, and other Western European nations joined in a military alliance – the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization
(NATO).
¾
aimed at protecting Western countries from the threat of invasion by theSoviet Union
¾
If conventional weapons were not enough, NATO members would usetactical nuclear weapons – atomic bombs and artillery shells.
¾
As a last resort, they would be prepared to wage total nuclear war.2. When NATO included West Germany as a member, the Soviet Union feltthreatened and established the
Warsaw Pact
in 1955.
¾
made up of Eastern European countries to protect themselves and theSoviet Union from attack

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->