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Table Of Contents

Introduction
How To Set Up and Maintain IMAP Servers
Protocols and Terms
1.1 Why Is IMAP So Complex?
POP3 and IMAP at the Protocol Level
2.1 POP3
2.1.1 Test Session
2.1.2 Authentication via APOP and KPOP
2.2 IMAP
2.2.1 The Design of the IMAP Protocol
2.2.2 Transcript of an IMAP Session
2.2.3 A Practical View of IMAP
2.2.4 Subscribing to IMAP Folders
Load Distribution and Reliability
No load balancer
3.1 Load Balancer
3.1.1 DNS Round Robin
3.1.3 Linux Virtual Server
3.2 IMAP Proxies
Selecting a Filesystem
4.1 A Performance Test
4.2 Tuning the Performance of the Filesystem
4.2.2 Access Control Lists
4.2.4 Journal Mode
4.3 RAID
4.4 NFS
4.4.2 NFS Version 3
4.4.3 Fast I/O
Complementary Webmail Clients
5.1 Squirrelmail
5.2 Horde/IMP
5.3 Fast Access via the IMAP Cache Proxy
Migrating IMAP servers
6.2 Converting mbox to maildir
6.3 Modifying Folder Names
6.4 Determining Cleartext Passwords
Structure and Basic Configuration
7.1 Installing the Software
7.2 What Is Where?
7.3 Initial Start-Up
7.4 Courier and MTAs
7.4.1 Courier and Postfix
7.4.2 Courier and QMail
7.4.3 Courier and Exim
7.5 Optimizing the Configuration
7.5.1 Real and “False” Configuration Parameters
7.6 The Configuration Files for SSL
Maildir as Email Storage Format
8.1 The IMAP Namespace
8.2 Filenames of Emails
8.2.1 Keywords: Custom IMAP Flags
User Data
9.3 Authentication via PAM
9.4.3 Creating a Binary Version of the User Database
9.6 Implementing Custom Authentication Methods
9.7 Integrating External Authentication Programs
9.8 Authentication via MySQL
9.9 Authentication via PostgreSQL
9.10 Authentication via LDAP
9.11 Obsolete Authentication Modules
9.12 User Options
9.12.2 Individual User Options in an LDAP Directory
9.13 Saving Passwords: Cleartext or Hash?
9.14 Username Selection When Maintaining Multiple Domains
The Work of a Courier Administrator
10.1 Shared Folders
10.1.1 Setting Up Virtual Shared Folders
10.1.2 Creating Filesystem-Based Shared Folders
10.2 Quotas
10.2.1 Quotas for Courier
10.2.2 Quotas and the MDA
10.3 Building an IMAP Proxy with Courier
10.5 Sending Emails via the IMAP Server
11.1 Installing Cyrus
11.1.1 OpenSuSE/SuSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES)
11.1.2 Fedora Core/Red Hat
11.1.3 Debian
11.2 The Cyrus Hierarchy and Permissions System
11.3 Features and Functions
11.4 Quick Start
11.4.1 Authentication and Mailboxes
11.4.2 Tests
A Closer Look at the Configuration Files
Authentication and Safeguards
13.1 Encrypting with SSL/TLS
13.1.1 SSL Transmission Types
13.1.2 Real and Fake Certificates
13.1.3 Creating and Integrating SSL Certificates
13.2 Cyrus SASL
13.2.1 Cyrus SASL Modules
13.2.3 The Authentication Process
13.3 Calling Different Data Sources
13.3.1 Standard Authentication Methods for Unix
13.3.3 Cyrus and MySQL
13.3.4 Cyrus and LDAP
13.3.5 Cyrus and Kerberos
Advanced Cyrus Configuration
14.1 Mailbox Quotas
14.1.1 Automatic Quotas
14.1.2 Manual Quotas
14.2 Shared Folders and ACLs
14.3 Virtual Domains
14.3.1 The Underlying Concept
14.3.2 Effects on ACLs
14.3.3 Domain Administrators
14.4 Sorting Emails into Subdirectories
14.5 Email Partitions
14.6 The Sieve Email Filter
14.6.2 Configuring and Testing
14.6.4 The Sieve Script Language
14.6.5 Setting Up Sieve Scripts Automatically for New Accounts
14.6.6 Adapting Sieve Scripts
14.7.1 Drums or Smoke Signals?
14.8 Cyrus and Other MTAs
14.9 Backing Up and Restoring Data
14.9.2 Restoring Quotas
14.10 Performance Tuning
Performance
Internal Structure and Modules
15.1 The Cyrus Daemons
15.2 Tools for Analysis, Maintenance, and Repairs
15.2.1 Statistics and Analysis
15.2.2 Maintenance and Repair
15.2.3 Internal Tools
15.3 Other In-House Tools
Cyrus at the Filesystem Level
16.1 The Email Directory
16.2 The Administration Directory
Cyrus in a Cluster
17.1 The Cyrus Aggregator
17.1.1 The Aggregator Concept
17.1.2 The Cluster Setup
17.2.1 Replicating the Authentication Data
Appendixes
IMAP Command Reference
A.1 Commands Always Available to Clients
A.2 Commands Available in the Not-Authenticated Status
A.2 Commands Available in the Not-Authenticated Status
A.3 Commands Available in the Authenticated Status
A.4 Commands Available in the Selected Status
B.1 An Overview of All Commands
Installing from the Source Code
C.1 Courier
C.2 Cyrus
C.2.1 Cyrus Sources
C.2.2 Creating a System User
C.2.5 Convenient Starting and Stopping
P. 1
The Book of IMAP: Building a Mail Server with Courier and Cyrus

The Book of IMAP: Building a Mail Server with Courier and Cyrus

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Published by No Starch Press
IMAP (the Internet Message Access Protocol) allows clients to access their email on a remote server, whether from the office, a remote location, or a cell phone or other device. IMAP is powerful and flexible, but it's also complicated to set up; it's more difficult to implement than POP3 and more error-prone for both client and server.

The Book of IMAP offers a detailed introduction to IMAP and POP3, the two protocols that govern all modern mail servers and clients. You'll learn how the protocols work as well as how to install, configure, and maintain the two most popular open source mail systems, Courier and Cyrus.

Authors Peer Heinlein and Peer Hartleben have set up hundreds of mail servers and offer practical hints about troubleshooting errors, migration, filesystem tuning, cluster setups, and password security that will help you extricate yourself from all sorts of tricky situations. You'll also learn how to:

* Create and use shared folders, virtual domains, and user quotas
* Authenticate user data with PAM, MySQL, PostgreSQL, and LDAP
* Handle heavy traffic with load balancers and proxies
* Use built-in tools for server analysis, maintenance, and repairs
* Implement complementary webmail clients like Squirrelmail and Horde/IMP
* Set up and use the Sieve email filter

Thoroughly commented references to the POP and IMAP protocols round out the book, making The Book of IMAP an essential resource for even the most experienced system administrators.

Peer Heinlein has been operating an independent ISP in Berlin with his colleagues since 1992. He specializes in mail servers of various sizes and enjoys ambitious Linux projects. He shares his experience in books and trainings.

Peer Hartleben is a CTO and Linux Security Consultant with a focus on Cyrus-based mail servers.

Co-published with Open Source Press.
IMAP (the Internet Message Access Protocol) allows clients to access their email on a remote server, whether from the office, a remote location, or a cell phone or other device. IMAP is powerful and flexible, but it's also complicated to set up; it's more difficult to implement than POP3 and more error-prone for both client and server.

The Book of IMAP offers a detailed introduction to IMAP and POP3, the two protocols that govern all modern mail servers and clients. You'll learn how the protocols work as well as how to install, configure, and maintain the two most popular open source mail systems, Courier and Cyrus.

Authors Peer Heinlein and Peer Hartleben have set up hundreds of mail servers and offer practical hints about troubleshooting errors, migration, filesystem tuning, cluster setups, and password security that will help you extricate yourself from all sorts of tricky situations. You'll also learn how to:

* Create and use shared folders, virtual domains, and user quotas
* Authenticate user data with PAM, MySQL, PostgreSQL, and LDAP
* Handle heavy traffic with load balancers and proxies
* Use built-in tools for server analysis, maintenance, and repairs
* Implement complementary webmail clients like Squirrelmail and Horde/IMP
* Set up and use the Sieve email filter

Thoroughly commented references to the POP and IMAP protocols round out the book, making The Book of IMAP an essential resource for even the most experienced system administrators.

Peer Heinlein has been operating an independent ISP in Berlin with his colleagues since 1992. He specializes in mail servers of various sizes and enjoys ambitious Linux projects. He shares his experience in books and trainings.

Peer Hartleben is a CTO and Linux Security Consultant with a focus on Cyrus-based mail servers.

Co-published with Open Source Press.

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Published by: No Starch Press on May 23, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved
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