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Hells Angels Infiltrator Can Pursue Contract Case

Hells Angels Infiltrator Can Pursue Contract Case

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Published by MansonCaseFile
As an agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Jay Anthony Dobyns was the lead undercover agent in "Operation Black Biscuit," the first operation to successfully penetrate the Hells Angels motorcycle gang. The 21-month undercover operation from 2001 to 2003 led to the indictment of more than 16 Hells Angels members. But Dobyns' relationship with the ATF deteriorated after his identity became publically known. Hells Angels members threatened him with violence and death, he said, but ATF did little to protect him or his family.
As an agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Jay Anthony Dobyns was the lead undercover agent in "Operation Black Biscuit," the first operation to successfully penetrate the Hells Angels motorcycle gang. The 21-month undercover operation from 2001 to 2003 led to the indictment of more than 16 Hells Angels members. But Dobyns' relationship with the ATF deteriorated after his identity became publically known. Hells Angels members threatened him with violence and death, he said, but ATF did little to protect him or his family.

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Published by: MansonCaseFile on Aug 01, 2013
Copyright:Public Domain

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10/12/2013

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Hells Angels Infiltrator Can Pursue Contract Case
By ANNIE YOUDERIAN(CN) - The government may have breached its settlement with a former federal agent who claimsthe Hells Angels burned down his house in retaliation for his successful infiltration of their motorcycle gang, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims ruled.As an agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Jay AnthonyDobyns was the lead undercover agent in "Operation Black Biscuit," the first operation tosuccessfully penetrate the Hells Angels motorcycle gang.The 21-month undercover operation from 2001 to 2003 led to the indictment of more than 16 HellsAngels members.But Dobyns' relationship with the ATF deteriorated after his identity became publically known.Hells Angels members threatened him with violence and death, he said, but ATF did little to protecthim or his family.When he complained to his superiors, he said the ATF launched a smear campaign against him,attacking his personal and professional reputation and claiming he wasn't fit for his job.In September 2007, the ATF offered Dobyns $373,000 "to fully resolve and settle any and all issuesand disputes rising out of [plaintiff's] employment with [ATF]."The ATF also agreed to fully investigate any increased threats and consider relocating Dobyns if needed.In August 2008, Dobyns' Tucson home was destroyed by arson - the work of Hells Angels,according to the former federal agent. The ATF allegedly responded by sending one investigator tothe scene, 30 hours after the fire. Dobyns said the ATF botched the investigation, even naming himas a suspect in the arson and attempted murder of his own family.The Office of Inspector General looked into Dobyns' complaints and concluded that the ATF had,in fact, bungled the investigation and had "needlessly and inappropriately delayed its responses" totwo other threats.Two months after the fire, Dobyns and his familysued the government for breach of contract and other alleged ATF actions, including harassment, discrimination, slander and defamation.The government argued that the case must be dismissed for lack of jurisdiction, because the contractclaims were simply tort claims in disguise.The claims court disagreed. "There is an express written contract here and, defendant's pettifoggerynotwithstanding, plaintiff's core claims are based upon the alleged breach of that agreement," JudgeFrancis Allegra wrote. "That should be -- and is -- enough."The government also tried to get the case dismissed for failure to state a claim, arguing that Dobyns'43-page, 147-count lawsuit never pinned down how the ATF allegedly breached particular parts of the settlement agreement.

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