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Baudolino -- Discussion Guide

Baudolino -- Discussion Guide

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It is April 1204, and Constantinople, the splendid capital of the Byzantine Empire, is being sacked and burned by the knights of the Fourth Crusade. Amid the carnage and confusion, one Baudolino saves a historian and high court official from certain death at the hands of the crusading warriors and proceeds to tell his own fantastical story.
It is April 1204, and Constantinople, the splendid capital of the Byzantine Empire, is being sacked and burned by the knights of the Fourth Crusade. Amid the carnage and confusion, one Baudolino saves a historian and high court official from certain death at the hands of the crusading warriors and proceeds to tell his own fantastical story.

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Published by: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on Aug 01, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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Reading Group Guide
Baudolino
By Umberto Eco
About the Book:
It is April 1204, and Constantinople, the splendid capital of the Byzantine Empire, is being sacked andburned by the knights of the Fourth Crusade. Amid the carnage and confusion, one Baudolino saves ahistorian and high court official from certain death at the hands of the crusading warriors and proceeds totell his own fantastical story.Born a simple peasant in northern Italy, Baudolino has two major gifts-a talent for learning languages anda skill in telling lies. When still a boy he meets a foreign commander in the woods, charming him with hisquick wit and lively mind. The commander-who proves to be Emperor Frederick Barbarossa-adoptsBaudolino and sends him to the university in Paris, where he makes a number of fearless, adventurousfriends.Spurred on by myths and their own reveries, this merry band sets out in search of Prester John, alegendary priest-king said to rule over a vast kingdom in the East-a phantasmagorical land of strangecreatures with eyes on their shoulders and mouths on their stomachs, of eunuchs, unicorns, and lovelymaidens.With dazzling digressions, outrageous tricks, extraordinary feeling, and vicarious reflections on our postmodern age, this is Eco the storyteller at his brilliant best.
About the author:Umberto Eco
is a professor of semiotics at the University of Bologna and the bestselling author of numerous novels and essays. He lives in Milan.
Discussion Questions:
 
Q.
Who is narrating the first chapter of this novel? What scenes, characters, and events described hereshow up later in the narrative? Consider this passage, near the end of the chapter: "I said to him whenyou learn to read then you learn everything you didnt know before. But when you write you write onlywhat you now allready so patientia Im better off not knowing how to write." How does this passage
exemplify the novel’s complex if not conflict
ed treatment of self-expression and communication (written,verbal, and so on)?
 Q.
One of the few constants in this brisk, far-
flung, and episodic adventure story is Baudolino’s
predilection to stretch the truth, rearrange the facts, fib, lie. What ironic points might Eco be making about

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