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Glin-VOL1-11-Commission to inquire into child abuse

Glin-VOL1-11-Commission to inquire into child abuse

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Published by James Dwyer
Glin-VOL1-11-Commission to inquire into child abuse,Sister Xavier/Severia is Sister Alida of Goldenbridge, Father Stefano is Rosminian Provincial Father Patrick Pierce (Ferryhouse), Brother Bruno is Sean Barry (Ferryhouse), Father Luca is Father William McGonagle (School Daingean County Offaly), Sister Astrid is Sister Joseph Conception of Sister Josephs KIlkenny, Thomas Pleece is David Murphy, 'Peter Tade' is Myles Brady, 'Brother Dieter' is James Kelly (Our Lady of Good Counsel school at Lota, Cork), 'Brother Guthrie' is Brother Eunan (Lota), 'Brother Dax' is Christian Brother Maurice Tobin (Letterfrack), Mercy nun 'Resident Manager' is Sister Calida' is Mercy Sister Nora Wall (St Michaels Home Cappoquin Waterford), 'Sister Wilma' is Sister Stanislaus Kennedy (St Josephs Kilkenny), 'John Brander' is Donal Dunne
Glin-VOL1-11-Commission to inquire into child abuse,Sister Xavier/Severia is Sister Alida of Goldenbridge, Father Stefano is Rosminian Provincial Father Patrick Pierce (Ferryhouse), Brother Bruno is Sean Barry (Ferryhouse), Father Luca is Father William McGonagle (School Daingean County Offaly), Sister Astrid is Sister Joseph Conception of Sister Josephs KIlkenny, Thomas Pleece is David Murphy, 'Peter Tade' is Myles Brady, 'Brother Dieter' is James Kelly (Our Lady of Good Counsel school at Lota, Cork), 'Brother Guthrie' is Brother Eunan (Lota), 'Brother Dax' is Christian Brother Maurice Tobin (Letterfrack), Mercy nun 'Resident Manager' is Sister Calida' is Mercy Sister Nora Wall (St Michaels Home Cappoquin Waterford), 'Sister Wilma' is Sister Stanislaus Kennedy (St Josephs Kilkenny), 'John Brander' is Donal Dunne

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: James Dwyer on May 23, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11.0111.0211.0311.0411.0511.06
Chapter 11
St Joseph’s Industrial School, Glin,Co Limerick (‘Glin’), 1872–1966
Introduction
The inquiry into St Joseph’s Industrial School, Glin consisted of an analysis of the documentarymaterial from various sources, namely the Christian Brothers, the Department of Education andScience, and the Bishop of Limerick.The Congregation supplied extra material between March 2007 and June 2008, pursuant to adecision to waive legal privilege that would, if it was applicable to the documents, have protectedthem from disclosure. Two reports on Glin gave information on the management and structure,and they have been used in compiling this report, particularly with respect to historical data andstatistics. Mr Bernard Dunleavy BL was asked to report on the archival material on Glin that wasin the Provincial House, Cluain Mhuire, and he asked Brothers who had been in Glin to writememoirs of their experiences there. Following this report, Br John McCormack also researchedthe documentation and spoke to Brothers who were in Glin when it operated as an industrialschool. The McCormack report was made available to the Committee in March 2007, and theDunleavy report in June 2008.St Joseph’s Industrial School began in a large purpose-built block in Sexton Street, Limerick, in1872. It was established under the Industrial Schools Act (Ireland), 1868, to care for and educateneglected, orphaned and abandoned Roman Catholic boys who were at risk of becomingdelinquents and entering a life of crime. The underlying philosophy was that giving such boys abasic education and a trade would make them useful citizens by preparing them for work inindustry or farming.The School remained on this site until 1928 when it transferred to the former Glin District Schoolin west County Limerick, where the School continued until it closed in 1966.
The move to Glin 
In 1894, Bishop Dwyer of Limerick proposed to the Local Government Board that children currentlyresiding in workhouses of Counties Limerick and north Kerry should be gathered into a DistrictSchool under the management of the Christian Brothers and the Sisters of Mercy. This DistrictSchool was housed in the old workhouse buildings at Glin. In 1920, workhouses throughout Irelandclosed and, in 1924, the Board of Health decided to close Glin District School. By 1926, the Schoolceased to exist.The Christian Brothers petitioned the Department of Education that St Joseph’s Industrial Schoolbe transferred to this site from the now-overcrowded building in Sexton Street. The Minister forEducation recommended the transfer to Glin, subject to a satisfactory report by the Inspector ofSchools on the suitability of the buildings, and provided certain alterations and improvements were
CICA Investigation Committee Report Vol. I 
489
 
11.0711.0811.09
made to the existing buildings. Renovation and improvement works costing £15,000 were carriedout. It involved the installation of a new hot water heating system, dining hall, infirmary, chapel,new floors in the dormitories, new windows and doors, new steam presses and new cookers.In June 1928, the staff and boys of St Joseph’s Industrial School moved to their new premises atGlin, some 50 kilometres from Limerick City. Despite the alterations, it was never a suitablebuilding for a boys’ residential school. A letter from the Brother Provincial on 14
th
November 1961suggested it did not become the property of the Christian Brothers. He wrote, ‘Glin was the onlyworkhouse that was handed over to us and hence the only Industrial School for which we arepaying rent to the Department of Health’. Correspondence with the Christian Brothers confirmedthat Glin never became the property of the Christian Brothers, but was leased at a yearly rent of£40 from Limerick Health Authority. In 1970, the premises were returned to the Authority.The majority of boys who were committed to Glin through the courts came from impoverished anddysfunctional backgrounds. Some were committed for criminal offences. Court orders and Schoolregisters retained by the Christian Brothers show that, during the period 1940 to 1966, a total of759 boys, of whom 131 were illegitimate, were committed to the School.The number of children in Glin grew during the 1930s and 1940s, reaching a peak of 212 in 1949and 1950. There was a steady decline in numbers during the 1950s and 1960s, and the Schoolwas closed in 1966, at which stage there were 48 boys in residence. The following table sets outthe numbers of boys in the School:
Year Number under detention
1937 1721938 1541939 1581940 1581941 1871942 2001943 2081944 2001945 2061946 2081947 2111948 2111949 2121950 2121951 2031952 1871953 1821954 1901955 1601956 1421957 1331958 1231959 1201960 1031961 911962 901963 821964 801965 681966 48
490
CICA Investigation Committee Report Vol. I 
 
11.1011.1111.1211.1311.1411.15
The average age of boys committed to Glin was nine years and 10 months, and the average stayof these boys was five years and eight months.Mr Dunleavy BL, in his report on Glin Industrial School, examined the reasons for boys beingadmitted. During the period 1940 to 1947, he tabulated his findings as follows:
Reason for admission Number
Destitution 111Larceny 62Not attending school 61Wandering 49Having a parent not a proper guardian 38Parents unable to control child 12Receiving alms 10Being under the care of a parent with criminal habits 6Homelessness 5Fraudulent conversion 2Housebreaking 2Assault 2Malicious damage 2Total 362
His examination of the data revealed that, apart from one 12-year-old boy who was sentenced fora period of one and a half years, ‘not one of the boys above was committed for less than themaximum period allowed by law’. In short, no boy was to leave the School before the age of 16.He went on to note:Even if crimes such as larceny, truanting and housebreaking, which may well have beenmotivated by poverty are excluded from the list of offences directly attributable to poverty– it is clear that over 48% of the boys were committed to Glin as a direct consequence oftheir impoverished backgrounds.Mr Dunleavy stated that, between 1947 and 1966, the reasons for admissions were as follows:
Reason for admission Number
Having a parent not a proper guardian 218Destitution 95Larceny 35Not attending school 12Housebreaking 7Wandering 6Homelessness 4Parents unable to control child 3Receiving Alms 2Parent unable to support child 2Fraud 1Being under the care of a parent with criminal habits 1Total 386
Management in Glin 
The Industrial Schools Act (Ireland), 1868 had envisaged that each school be under the controlof a Manager and Management Committee, with the day-to-day running of the school under thesupervision of a Resident Manager. In Glin, however, as in all Christian Brothers’ industrial
CICA Investigation Committee Report Vol. I 
491

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