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Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln's Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities

Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln's Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities

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3.82

(150)
|Views: 180 |Likes:
Published by Workman Publishing
A tree that sheds poison daggers; a glistening red seed that stops the heart; a shrub that causes paralysis; a vine that strangles; and a leaf that triggered a war. In Wicked Plants, Stewart takes on over two hundred of Mother Nature’s most appalling creations. It’s an A to Z of plants that kill, maim, intoxicate, and otherwise offend. You’ll learn which plants to avoid (like exploding shrubs), which plants make themselves exceedingly unwelcome (like the vine that ate the South), and which ones have been killing for centuries (like the weed that killed Abraham Lincoln's mother). Menacing botanical illustrations and splendidly ghastly drawings create a fascinating portrait of the evildoers that may be lurking in your own backyard. Drawing on history, medicine, science, and legend, this compendium of bloodcurdling botany will entertain, alarm, and enlighten even the most intrepid gardeners and nature lovers.
A tree that sheds poison daggers; a glistening red seed that stops the heart; a shrub that causes paralysis; a vine that strangles; and a leaf that triggered a war. In Wicked Plants, Stewart takes on over two hundred of Mother Nature’s most appalling creations. It’s an A to Z of plants that kill, maim, intoxicate, and otherwise offend. You’ll learn which plants to avoid (like exploding shrubs), which plants make themselves exceedingly unwelcome (like the vine that ate the South), and which ones have been killing for centuries (like the weed that killed Abraham Lincoln's mother). Menacing botanical illustrations and splendidly ghastly drawings create a fascinating portrait of the evildoers that may be lurking in your own backyard. Drawing on history, medicine, science, and legend, this compendium of bloodcurdling botany will entertain, alarm, and enlighten even the most intrepid gardeners and nature lovers.

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Publish date: May 21, 2009
Added to Scribd: Aug 01, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781565126831
List Price: $18.95

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04/20/2014

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9781565126831

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sparkleponies reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I enjoyed reading this book and think it would be a good fit for anyone who likes to gather trivia. Lots of common plants that we see daily are featured here and will make you take a second look at the gorgeous garden next doorl 
satyridae reviewed this
Rated 2/5
I found this kind of repetitive and... well, frankly, a little boring. I wanted more stories about real people, on the order of the Lincoln's mom story. There were lots of little informative bits, but not as many anecdotes as I thought I'd be getting. I was also a little skeptical of some of the information, especially on psychedelic plants.
glade1 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I enjoyed this little volume. It is lighthearted but informative, although not in-depth. It is the sort of book that makes me want to go dig up more information on this topic. I have a "brown thumb" and do not enjoy gardening, and have never had a great affinity for plants, but these are some amazing examples. I am constantly amazed by nature and the bizarre adaptations its plants and animals resort to.I like the quaint design of this book and its companion, Wicked Bugs, as well, but at times I wished for photographs rather than line drawings. Guess that's what I'll have to look for if I ever go digging for more information on wicked plants and bugs!
linda1fugate reviewed this
Rated 3/5
An interesting non-fiction work. It is curious to see how many botanicals in our homes or yars are lethal to people or animals, even ones we have easily within reach. A short book with an unusual topic.
katharinedb reviewed this
Rated 4/5
fabulous fun read.. visitors to my garden beware..
markfinl reviewed this
Rated 4/5
What I learned from this book: All plants want to kill you.
laurensx reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Such a fun book to read! Amy Stewart's writing style is wonderful and really added to the topic of the book. She captured the notoriousness of these plants and made them come alive with their sinister and evil natures. As a gardener, I was intrigued with the number of toxic plants, all the while, wishing I could actually see one of these plants in real life - save for the poison ivy and stinging nettles. Really clever topic and very witty in it's delivery!
richardderus reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Rating: 3.5* of fiveThe Book Report: Bite-sized reports of the horrible horrible scary itchy deadly horrible doings of the Kingdom Plantae. Illustrated with beautiful woodcuts by [[Briony Morrow-Cribbs]], that are, by themselves, worth the price of the book.My Review: I swear I have never bathed so often as when I read this book. Hibiclens, pHisoHex, witch hazel, lavender water...every cleansing agent I possess...applied to every inch of my quite sizable person, at least three or four times for every plant I read about. Even my shoulder hair is falling out from over-washing. (There go the last long, wavy locks I'll ever have....)*Most* satisfyingly, the horrid, nasty, icky-ptoo-ptoo nonfood CORN is included in the book! (Yes it is too: pp38-39...comes in for harsh treatment because the body *can't use it* in kernel form! Take THAT corn-on-the-cobbers! Horrible stuff, corn on the cob. Oughta be banned.)So many awful horrible, itch-inducing theings described in one small place would normally mean stay the heck away from it, but Stewart really does a fine job of making her villains fascinating, if not sympathetic. Hope she writes a novel one day soon.
bodagirl reviewed this
Rated 3/5
A diverting subject, but the delivery wasn't as entertaining as I expected. It fell on the line between diverting read and reference book. The only thing it needed to be a reference book was an index (which it could have benefited from, because not all the plants mentioned in the book were listed in the table of contents), better pictures (I still don't know what most of the plants look like), and slightly more scientific descriptions. Besides that the anecdotes and little bits of history were interesting and the overall concept was interesting.Snack Lit rating: veggie (pun intended)
intplibrarian_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Could have been exponentially better if only it had had pictures! I kept referring to Wikipedia while reading the book to get an idea of what each plant looked like and where it was usually found, but that gets tiresome.I really love this kind of book. Small blurbs that are just enough to get you interested in looking up more information sometimes... but I don't want to do it for each and every entry!The book is a lot of fun to read. As a fan of books like The Book of Lists and that sort of genre, it's right up my alley. BUT, if there's any book that *needs* pictures more... . Maybe another enhanced edition is possible? I really think that if it had only had pictures, I would be complaining about not being able to give MORE than five stars.

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