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Table Of Contents

MAKING, BUYING, AND COOKING STEAK
NOT AGING STEAK AT HOME
GRADING BEEF
ODE TO BEEFSTEAK
SEARING
BILL’S SIX-STEP GUIDE TO GREAT GRILLING
T-BONE
CLOSING THE GAP
CONDIMENTS
A MIGHTY PORTERHOUSE STEAK
COMPOSED BUTTERS
SALTING
THE ENDURING MAGIC OF THE STEAK HOUSE
THE CASE FOR FAT
RESTING
WINE WITH STEAK
SUCCULENCE AND SIMPLICITY
ROASTING PEPPERS
TASTING STEAK
CARVING
SIRLOIN
TOMATO PASTE IN TUBES
CHUCK
BEEFSTEAK CLUB RULES
TENDERIZING
STEWING
ROUND/RUMP
ADDING FLAVOR
PEELING TOMATOES
PEELING GARLIC AND SHALLOTS
THE STEAK IN HISTORY
FLANK
A NOTE ON TEMPERATURE
STEAK AND DIET
SKIRT
MUSTARD
CROSSTOWN CUTS
MAKING BARBECUE SAUCE
TOWN
PARSLEY
MAIL-ORDER STEAKS
CONVERSION CHART
INDEX
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Steak Lover's Cookbook

Steak Lover's Cookbook

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Published by Workman Publishing
Marrying simplicity and succulence, steak is a food everyone can understand, and one of the very few to inspire genuine craving. Steak is William Rice's avocation, his passion, and he's researched different preparations and flavors of steak from all over the world. A collection of over 140 recipes, steak lover's cookbook is divided between fancy uptown cuts (e.g., tenderloins, porterhouses, ribs) and the plainer but just as tasty downtown cuts (skirt, chuck, flank, round). It includes the Best-Ever recipe for each type, plus dozens of inviting alternatives, not to mention Steak Fries, Outrageous Onion Rings, and Mississippi Mud Pie. It's a steakhouse at home. 84,000 copies in print.
Marrying simplicity and succulence, steak is a food everyone can understand, and one of the very few to inspire genuine craving. Steak is William Rice's avocation, his passion, and he's researched different preparations and flavors of steak from all over the world. A collection of over 140 recipes, steak lover's cookbook is divided between fancy uptown cuts (e.g., tenderloins, porterhouses, ribs) and the plainer but just as tasty downtown cuts (skirt, chuck, flank, round). It includes the Best-Ever recipe for each type, plus dozens of inviting alternatives, not to mention Steak Fries, Outrageous Onion Rings, and Mississippi Mud Pie. It's a steakhouse at home. 84,000 copies in print.

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Publish date: Oct 1, 1996
Added to Scribd: Aug 02, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780761100805
List Price: $13.95

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03/16/2015

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Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Rump. Loin. Skirt. Hoof. Chuck. Flank. Butt. Sometimes it's hard to tell whether food journalist Rice gets greater pleasure from writing these meaty monosyllables or from eating the cuts of beef they name. He's a modified beef purist, which means he accepts the proposition that it's permissible to apply more than fire to a good cut of meat. He'll subject a porterhouse to a sherry-shallot vinaigrette, whip up a Thai marinade for a flank steak or dress a rib-eye steak with a pinot noir buerre rouge. The book is divided into sections devoted to the various cuts of beef, beginning with the tenderloin (and the filets into which it is often cut) and closing with the cheaper cuts like chuck. Rice offers solid, simple recipes for every part of the cow, from an elegant steak au poivre ("The True Steak," made with filet mignon) to Chicken-Fried Cube Steak with Pan Gravy. There are also recipes for sides like Steak Fries Without the Frier and Okra with Toasted Onions and Cumin. Although many of the preparations require a good outdoor grill, Rice is a big fan of pan-frying in a mixture of butter and olive oil. He broils, too (though most home broilers simply won't do a prime cut of meat justice). With sidenotes on favored steakhouses, shopping tips and ample cow lore, this cookbook offers plenty for both the casual and the committed carnivore to chew on. Author tour. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

1996-12-02, Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Rump. Loin. Skirt. Hoof. Chuck. Flank. Butt. Sometimes it's hard to tell whether food journalist Rice gets greater pleasure from writing these meaty monosyllables or from eating the cuts of beef they name. He's a modified beef purist, which means he accepts the proposition that it's permissible to apply more than fire to a good cut of meat. He'll subject a porterhouse to a sherry-shallot vinaigrette, whip up a Thai marinade for a flank steak or dress a rib-eye steak with a pinot noir buerre rouge. The book is divided into sections devoted to the various cuts of beef, beginning with the tenderloin (and the filets into which it is often cut) and closing with the cheaper cuts like chuck. Rice offers solid, simple recipes for every part of the cow, from an elegant steak au poivre ("The True Steak," made with filet mignon) to Chicken-Fried Cube Steak with Pan Gravy. There are also recipes for sides like Steak Fries Without the Frier and Okra with Toasted Onions and Cumin. Although many of the preparations require a good outdoor grill, Rice is a big fan of pan-frying in a mixture of butter and olive oil. He broils, too (though most home broilers simply won't do a prime cut of meat justice). With sidenotes on favored steakhouses, shopping tips and ample cow lore, this cookbook offers plenty for both the casual and the committed carnivore to chew on. Author tour. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

1996-12-02, Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Rump. Loin. Skirt. Hoof. Chuck. Flank. Butt. Sometimes it's hard to tell whether food journalist Rice gets greater pleasure from writing these meaty monosyllables or from eating the cuts of beef they name. He's a modified beef purist, which means he accepts the proposition that it's permissible to apply more than fire to a good cut of meat. He'll subject a porterhouse to a sherry-shallot vinaigrette, whip up a Thai marinade for a flank steak or dress a rib-eye steak with a pinot noir buerre rouge. The book is divided into sections devoted to the various cuts of beef, beginning with the tenderloin (and the filets into which it is often cut) and closing with the cheaper cuts like chuck. Rice offers solid, simple recipes for every part of the cow, from an elegant steak au poivre ("The True Steak," made with filet mignon) to Chicken-Fried Cube Steak with Pan Gravy. There are also recipes for sides like Steak Fries Without the Frier and Okra with Toasted Onions and Cumin. Although many of the preparations require a good outdoor grill, Rice is a big fan of pan-frying in a mixture of butter and olive oil. He broils, too (though most home broilers simply won't do a prime cut of meat justice). With sidenotes on favored steakhouses, shopping tips and ample cow lore, this cookbook offers plenty for both the casual and the committed carnivore to chew on. Author tour. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

1996-12-02, Publishers Weekly
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