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Man with a Pan

Man with a Pan

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3.45

(11)
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Published by Workman Publishing
Look who’s making dinner! Twenty-one of our favorite writers and chefs expound upon the joys—and perils—of feeding their families.Mario Batali’s kids gobble up monkfish liver and foie gras. Peter Kaminsky’s youngest daughter won’t eat anything at all. Mark Bittman reveals the four stages of learning to cook. Stephen King offers tips about what to cook when you don’t feel like cooking. And Jim Harrison shows how good food and wine trump expensive cars and houses. This book celebrates those who toil behind the stove, trying to nourish and please. Their tales are accompanied by more than sixty family-tested recipes, time-saving tips, and cookbook recommendations, as well as New Yorker cartoons. Plus there are interviews with homestyle heroes from all across America—a fireman in Brooklyn, a football coach in Atlanta, and a bond trader in Los Angeles, among others. What emerges is a book not just about food but about our changing families. It offers a newfound community for any man who proudly dons an apron and inspiration for those who have yet to pick up the spatula.
Look who’s making dinner! Twenty-one of our favorite writers and chefs expound upon the joys—and perils—of feeding their families.Mario Batali’s kids gobble up monkfish liver and foie gras. Peter Kaminsky’s youngest daughter won’t eat anything at all. Mark Bittman reveals the four stages of learning to cook. Stephen King offers tips about what to cook when you don’t feel like cooking. And Jim Harrison shows how good food and wine trump expensive cars and houses. This book celebrates those who toil behind the stove, trying to nourish and please. Their tales are accompanied by more than sixty family-tested recipes, time-saving tips, and cookbook recommendations, as well as New Yorker cartoons. Plus there are interviews with homestyle heroes from all across America—a fireman in Brooklyn, a football coach in Atlanta, and a bond trader in Los Angeles, among others. What emerges is a book not just about food but about our changing families. It offers a newfound community for any man who proudly dons an apron and inspiration for those who have yet to pick up the spatula.

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Categories:Books, Cooking & Food
Publish date: May 17, 2011
Added to Scribd: Aug 02, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781565129856
List Price: $15.95

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02/26/2015

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Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Cartoonist and New Yorker editor Donohue celebrates dads who cook with a delightful compendium of essays, recipes, cartoons, and interviews. Noting that American fathers "now account for nearly a third of the time a family spends cooking," Donohue-himself a cooking dad-checks how this trend is working out by soliciting a variety of personal perspectives. Among them are such professional voices as Mario Batali and cookbook author Mark Bittman. Not surprisingly, many of the contributors are writers, such as Stephen King, Jim Harrison, Mohammed Naseehu Ali, and Wesley Stace. Under the heading, "In the Trenches," Donohue explores the routines of other average guys: a Brooklyn fireman, a software engineer, and a father of two in New Orleans. And while few are clueless in the kitchen, it is their wit, devotion, and candor that inspire. For example, in "Who the Man?" Jesse Green writes about being the noncook in a two-dad household suddenly faced with kitchen duty; and Matt Greenberg creates a screenplay explaining how to grill. Less a production but equally intriguing is what men cook: gumbo, fish tacos, roast chicken. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

2011-04-11, Publishers Weekly
dougbq reviewed this
Rated 2/5
Interesting concept. A number of male foodies write about feeding their families. Some of them are writers. Some are chefs, and some are just guys. The quality of the writing is all over the place. Some of the chapters are really interesting. Some are not.Each writer shares at least one recipe. Some of those are intriguing.
timtom_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
That my wife brought this book back from her latest trip as a gift for me meant a lot for me, as a little recognition certainly means a lot to the thousands of dads out there who regularly cook for their families. This witty anthology goes beyond the classic "men who cook" (either chefs or fair-weather dads whose sole contribution is lighting up the BBQ on Sunday) and plunges right into the flour-covered lives of men who shop for groceries, plan dinners, chop veggies and tell their children how to hold a colander.That we are not alone out there is already a refreshing thought, but this book goes much farther by being utterly entertaining and informative. Each invited author contributes a few of their key cookbooks and, of course, unveil some of their prized recipes. Even though some stories tend to corroborate the usual cliché of "stunt-cooking" men with large amounts of virile meat and grunted fishing tales, most are more sensible and together give a fairly broad overview of the many styles of cooking. Utterly delicious.
Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Cartoonist and New Yorker editor Donohue celebrates dads who cook with a delightful compendium of essays, recipes, cartoons, and interviews. Noting that American fathers "now account for nearly a third of the time a family spends cooking," Donohue-himself a cooking dad-checks how this trend is working out by soliciting a variety of personal perspectives. Among them are such professional voices as Mario Batali and cookbook author Mark Bittman. Not surprisingly, many of the contributors are writers, such as Stephen King, Jim Harrison, Mohammed Naseehu Ali, and Wesley Stace. Under the heading, "In the Trenches," Donohue explores the routines of other average guys: a Brooklyn fireman, a software engineer, and a father of two in New Orleans. And while few are clueless in the kitchen, it is their wit, devotion, and candor that inspire. For example, in "Who the Man?" Jesse Green writes about being the noncook in a two-dad household suddenly faced with kitchen duty; and Matt Greenberg creates a screenplay explaining how to grill. Less a production but equally intriguing is what men cook: gumbo, fish tacos, roast chicken. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

2011-04-11, Publishers Weekly
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