Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Divine Pymander - A translation and commentary by David Myatt

The Divine Pymander - A translation and commentary by David Myatt

Ratings:

5.0

(1)
|Views: 97 |Likes:
Published by Dark Japer
A translation of and a commentary on the Greek text of 'Mercvrii Trismegisti Pymander de potestate et sapientia dei', otherwise known as 'the Divine Pymander'. Forming part of the ancient Corpus Hermeticum, the Divine Pymander is one of the standard Hermetic and Gnostic texts, outlining as it does Hermetic philosophy, and portions of the text were, in Mead’s 1906 translation, used by the Theosophical Society, by occult groups such as The Hermetic Order of The Golden Dawn, and by the British occultist Aleister Crowley.

Myatt's translation provides a new insight into the text, and makes it far more accessible to, and understandable, by students of gnosticism, hermeticism, and the occult, and its main appeal will be to such students and to others interested in the arcane.
A translation of and a commentary on the Greek text of 'Mercvrii Trismegisti Pymander de potestate et sapientia dei', otherwise known as 'the Divine Pymander'. Forming part of the ancient Corpus Hermeticum, the Divine Pymander is one of the standard Hermetic and Gnostic texts, outlining as it does Hermetic philosophy, and portions of the text were, in Mead’s 1906 translation, used by the Theosophical Society, by occult groups such as The Hermetic Order of The Golden Dawn, and by the British occultist Aleister Crowley.

Myatt's translation provides a new insight into the text, and makes it far more accessible to, and understandable, by students of gnosticism, hermeticism, and the occult, and its main appeal will be to such students and to others interested in the arcane.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Dark Japer on Aug 02, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial No-derivs

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/11/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Mercvrii Trismegisti Pymander de potestate et sapientia dei A Translation and Commentary 
Preface
The Greek text of the tractate often referred to as thePœmandres/Pymander part of the Corpus Hermeticum was first published byTurnebus in Paris in 1554
CE
under the title Ερμόυ του Τρισμεγ́ιστουΠοιμ́ανδρης Ασκληπιόυ ́Οροι προς ́ Αμμονα Βασιλ́εα,
Mercurii Trismegisti Pœmander, seu De potestate ac sapientia divina
. This followed therepublication, in 1532
CE
, of the Latin translation by Marsilius Ficinus in anedition with the intriguing title
Mercvrii Trismegisti Pymander de potestate et sapientia dei. Eivsdem Asclepivs, de uoluntate dei. Opuscula sanctissimis mysterijs, ac uerè coelestibus oraculis illustrissima. Iamblichvs De mysterijs  Aegytiorum, Chaldaeorum, & Assyriorū. Proclvus In Platonicum Alcibiadem,de anima & daemone. Idem De sacrificio & magia.
Of the origin of the knowledge expounded in the text, the author declares at v.2 thatεἰμὶ ὁ Ποιμάνδρης ὁ τῆς αὐθεντίας νοῦς οἶδα ὃ βούλει καὶ σύνειμίσοι πανταχοῦWhich implies - qv. my translation, and notes and commentary on the text -that what Pœmandres is about to reveal is an authentic perceiveration, andthis supernatural being [or archetype] knows what is desired/wantedbecause, like the guardian daemons of classical and Hellenic culture,Pœmandres is close by.What is revealed is a summary of that weltanschauung that has been termedhermetic philosophy; a summary widely regarded as an important hermetictext and as dating from the second or the third century
CE
; and a summarywhich contains many interesting notions and allusions, such as logos,physis/Physis, the septenary system, the gospel of John, the femininecharacter of Physis/Nature, the doxology Agios o Theos, and θεός as beingboth male and female in one person - that is, either
ἀνδρόγυνος 
or (morecontroversially) bisexual.
 
In my translation I have endeavoured to express the underlying concepts asaccurately as possible - which sometimes necessitated transliterations (qv.the Introduction) - based as this endeavour is on some forty years of study of theological, ancient philosophical, classical, Arabic, and alchemical, texts.The Greek text used is that of A.D. Nock & A-J. Festugiere,
Corpus Hermeticum,
Collection Budé, 1946, although occasionally I have followedthe reading of the MSS rather than Nock's emendations.In the translation, angled brackets < > indicate an emendation, missingtext, or a conjectural reading of the text.
David Myatt2013
°°°
 
Introduction
In the case of the Corpus Hermeticum, the task of translating ancientGreek into English is complicated by the terminology used in the text, andwhich text is concerned with matters which the English word metaphysicalfairly well describes. Words such as λόγος, νοῦς, πνεῦμα, δημιουργόν, φῶς,ψυχή, στοιχεῖον, [
καὶ τὰ λοιπά 
], all require careful consideration if the text isto be understood in relation to the cultural milieu existing at the time of itscomposition; a milieu where a Hellenistic paganism, of various types andhues, thrived alongside the still relatively new religion of Christianity. All toooften, such Greek words are translated by an English word which has, overcenturies, acquired a meaning which is not or which may not be relevant tothat milieu, resulting in a 'retrospective reinterpretation' of the text. Onethinks here of λόγος translated as 'word' (or Word) which thus suffuses, orcan suffuse, the text with the meanings that nearly two thousand years of Christian exegesis have ascribed to that term. I have, in an appendix,endeavoured to explain what I mean by such retrospective reinterpretationby giving some examples from other texts.In an effort to avoid such retrospective reinterpretation here, and thepreconceptions thus imposed upon the text, I have sometimes usedtransliterations, sometimes used a relatively obscure English word, andsometimes used a new term. My intent in using such terms, such words, andsuch transliterations, is two fold. (1) To perhaps inspire some to undertaketheir own research into both the Greek text and the metaphysical mattersmentioned in the text, sans preconceptions. (2) To hopefully enable thereader without a knowledge of Greek (and of the minutiae of over a centuryof scholarly analysis of the Greek text) to appreciate the text anew andunderstand why it is and has - in the original Greek - been regarded as animportant document in respect of a particular, ancient, weltanschauung that,over the centuries, proved most influential and which can still be of interestto those interested in certain metaphysical speculations.For, in respect of the text itself, I incline toward the view that it represents apersonal weltanschauung germane to its time. That is, that rather than beingrepresentative of some axiomatical pre-existing philosophy or of somereligious school of thought, it reproduces the insight and the understandingof one person regarding particular metaphysical matters; and an insight andan understanding no doubt somewhat redolent of, and influenced by, andsometimes perhaps paraphrasing, some such philosophies and/or some such

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
sliddell_3 liked this
1 hundred reads
GnosticLucifer liked this
Dark Japer liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->