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Field and Garden Vegetables

Field and Garden Vegetables

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Published by Hirudinea Returns
Field and Garden Vegetables
Field and Garden Vegetables

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Published by: Hirudinea Returns on Aug 03, 2013
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THEFIELD AND GARDENVEGETABLES
OF
AMERICA;
CONTAINING
FULL DESCRIPTIONS OF NEARLY ELEVEN HUNDREDSPECIESAND VARIETIES; WITH DIRECTIONS FOR PROPAGATION,CULTURE, AND USE.
BY FEARING BURR, JR.
ILLUSTRATED.
BOSTON: CROSBY AND NICHOLS,117, WASHINGTON STREET.1863.Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1863,BY FEARING BURR, JR.,In the Clerk's office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.BOSTON:PRINTED BY JOHN WILSON AND SON, 5, WATER STREET
 
 TO
HON. ALBERT FEARING,
President of the Hingham Agricultural and Horticultural Society,
WHOSE EARNEST LABORS AND LIBERAL CONTRIBUTIONS INTHE CAUSE OFHUMANITY HAVE ENDEARED HIS NAME TO THE AGED POORAND TOORPHAN CHILDREN, AND WHOSE ACTIVE SERVICES HAVEEXERTED SO BENEFICIAL AN INFLUENCE ON AGRICULTURALPURSUITS IN HIS NATIVE TOWN,
This Volume is gratefully and respectfully DedicatedBY THE AUTHOR.
PREFACE.
Though embracing all the directions necessary for the successfulmanagement of a Vegetable Garden, the present volume is offered to thepublic as a manual or guide to assist in the selection of varieties, ratherthan as a treatise on cultivation. Through the standard works of American authors, as well as by means of the numerous agricultural andhorticultural periodicals of our time, all information of importancerelative to the various methods of propagation and culture, now ingeneral practice, can be readily obtained.But, with regard to the characteristics which distinguish the numerousvarieties; their difference in size, form, color, quality, and season of perfection; their hardiness, productiveness, and comparative value forcultivation,—these details, a knowledge of which is important as well tothe experienced cultivator as to the beginner, have heretofore beenobtained only through sources scattered and fragmentary.To supply this deficiency in horticultural literature, I have endeavored, inthe following pages, to give full descriptions of the vegetables commonto the gardens of this country. It is not, however, presumed that the list iscomplete, as many varieties, perhaps of much excellence, arecomparatively local: never having been described, they are, of course,little known. Neither is the expectation indulged, that all the descriptionswill be found perfect; though much allowance must be made in this
 
respect for the influence of soil, locality, and climate, as well as for thedifference in taste of different individuals.Much time, labor, and expense have been devoted to secure accuracy of names and synonymes; the seeds of nearly all of the prominent varietieshaving been imported both from England and France, and planted, inconnection with American vegetables of the same name, with referenceto this object alone.The delay and patience required in the preparation of a work like thepresent may be in some degree appreciated from the fact, that in order toobtain some comparatively unimportant particular with regard to thefoliage, flower, fruit, or seed, of some obscure and almost unknownplant, it has been found necessary to import the seed or root; to plant, totill, to watch, and wait an entire season.Though some vegetables have been included which have proved of littlevalue either for the table or for agricultural purposes, still it is believedsuch descriptions will be found by no means unimportant; as a timelyknowledge of that which is inferior, or absolutely worthless, is often asadvantageous as a knowledge of that which is of positive superiority.That the volume may be acceptable to the agriculturist, seedsman, and toall who may possess, cultivate, or find pleasure in, a garden, is thesincere wish of the author.
F. B., J
R
.
 
H
INGHAM
, March, 1863.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
In the preparation of this work, I have received the cheerful co-operationof many esteemed personal friends, to whom I would here express mygrateful acknowledgments.For many valuable suggestions with regard to the culture and generalmanagement of the Potato, as well as for much important informationrespecting nearly all of our American varieties of this vegetable, I amindebted to
J. F. C. H
YDE
, Esq., of Newton, Mass.; whose longexperience in the production of seedlings, as well as in the cultivation of established kinds, will give peculiar value to this portion of the volume.The illustrations, so excellent and truthful, are from the pencil of Mr.
I
SAAC
S
PRAGUE
, of Cambridge, Mass.; whose fine delineations of animal as well as vegetable life have won for him the reputation of being"the first of living artists."I am peculiarly indebted to Rev.
E. P
ORTER
D
YER
, of Hingham, formuch valuable advice and assistance; and cannot too fully express myobligations for the unvarying kindness and courteous manner in which

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