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DIY-Airconditioning Waste Water Recovery

DIY-Airconditioning Waste Water Recovery

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This paper covers the results of a project conducted by Dr. Ronald Stiffler in which otherwise discarded water obtained from the humidity reduction process in residential air conditioning systems was diverted, captured and used in non-potable applications.
This paper covers the results of a project conducted by Dr. Ronald Stiffler in which otherwise discarded water obtained from the humidity reduction process in residential air conditioning systems was diverted, captured and used in non-potable applications.

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Published by: Dr. Ronald R. Stiffler on May 25, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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© 2005-2009 Dr. Ronald StifflerAll rights reserved worldwideRel: 2.1 5.09
DIY – AIRCONDITIONING WASTE WATER RECOVERYRonald R. Stiffler
1
 
1
Senior Scientist, Stiffler Scientific, Humble, Texas, USADrStiffler@embarqmail.com
 
 Abstract---
This paper covers the results of a project conducted by Dr. Ronald Stiffler inwhich otherwise discarded water obtained from the humidity reduction process inresidential air conditioning systems was diverted, captured and used in non-potableapplications.
I Introduction
Because of the constantly increasing price and scarcity of water and a growingConservation and Green awareness sweeping many parts of the globe a question aroseduring one of Dr. Stifflers water research projects; ‘Why is the recovered water fromresidential air conditioning units being discarded into sewer systems’?Water rates in many areas of the United States have reached and in many cases equal toor exceed energy costs. This can be seen specifically in areas switching from ground tosurface water sources. Along with these environmental factors is the added cost of delivery, quality, maintenance and security.Coupled with all of the above reasons it must be understood that City, State and Federalgovernment's have found water to be a deep pocket money source, which canbe continually tapped for money to fund all forms of programs and endeavors.The end user price for one thousand gallons of water in many areas of the United States isnow exceeding the cost of one-kilowatt of electricity. In the area in which Dr. Stifflerconducted this project, water for the test residence cost approximately $12.60 perthousand gallons for the water, which included additional fees from Municipal UtilityDistrict (MUD), and RWA (Rural Water Authority) fees and bond payoffs, while one-kilowatt of electricity cost $0.14.Water is essential for life as we understand it and places the consumer and provider atodds because of the delicate balance required between profit and survival.
II The Project
 
© 2005-2009 Dr. Ronald StifflerAll rights reserved worldwideRel: 2.1 5.09This research project is only applicable to areas, which require air conditioning for atleast eight months of each year, and have an average Relative Humidity in excess of 45%.This project was broken up into four specific areas as listed in the following.1) Construct and evaluate a system for capturing the normally discarded water producedby home air conditioning systems resulting from humidity reduction during the coolingcycle.2) Determine the average number of gallons (liters) that may be removed and recoveredin an average 30-day cooling period.3) Determine the cost of an average system installation and the required payback timeperiod at which the recovered water could be considered free.The project worked with two air conditioning units as indicated in the following;1ea. Trane 3 Ton, Model 2TTR2-0361ea. Trane 2.5 Ton, Model 2TTR2-030The total area cooled by the two air conditioning units was 3000 ft
2
(679.6 m
3
), 3000 ft
2
. /5.5tons = 545.46 ft
2
(123.6 m
3
), per air-conditioning ton.The following pictures and text cover various configurations and results obtained fromthe research.Each test A/C unit has two water output connections on the evaporator units; 1) Anoverflow connection, should the drain line become plugged, 2) the water outputconnection to the drain line. The following labeled picture shows the water connectionson the project 3-ton unit. For some reason, known only to the A/C installation personnel,the project units overflow output is plugged.
 
© 2005-2009 Dr. Ronald StifflerAll rights reserved worldwideRel: 2.1 5.09Water output connections on the projects 3-ton unit
Fig: 1
It is noted that each drain line is 3/4" PVC and the two units drain lines join into acommon 3/4" PVC line normally running straight to a sewer drainpipe.

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