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08-05-13edition

08-05-13edition

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San Mateo Daily Journal
San Mateo Daily Journal

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Published by: San Mateo Daily Journal on Aug 05, 2013
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11/29/2013

 
www.smdailyjournal.com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday
Aug.5,2013
Vol XII,Edition 302
HIT-AND-RUN
STATE PAGE 5
 
RARE PHOTOSUP FOR BID
FOR THE RECORDPAGE 2
ALL-STARSWIN AGAIN
SPORTS PAGE 11
DRIVER PLOWS INTO CROWD ATBOARDWALK
Stubborn Fat?
Dr. Bruce Maltz, M.D.Dr. Carie Chui, M.D.
ALLURA SKIN & LASER CENTER
280 Baldwin Ave. Downtown San Mateo
(650)344-1121
Family Owned & Operated 
 Established: 1949
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO GovernorJerry Brown has averted a strike of San Francisco’s Bay Area RapidTransit system, promising riders anormal commute Monday morn-ing.Late Sunday night Brown issuedan order for a seven-day inquiryinto the contract dispute thatthreatened to shut down one of theregion’s major train lines.The transit system has been atodds with two unions over a newcontract.The unions issued a 72-hourstrike notice early Friday thatwould have fouled Monday’s com-mute.BART, the nation’s fifth-largestrail system, serves more than400,000 commuters each week-day.The unions went on strike lastmonth, shutting down BARTserv-ice for four days. They later agreedto extend their contracts untilSunday and continue negotia-tions.Key sticking points in the labordispute included pensions andhealth care costs.Representatives from BARTmanagement and the agency’s twolargest employee unions negotiat-ed for about 14 hours Saturday andresumed bargaining Sunday morn-ing as a midnight deadlineloomed.Big differences remain on keyissues including wages, pensions,worker safety and health care
 
BART strike averted for now
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County officials might take aswipe at its ballooning unfundedpension liability by cutting a $50million check from extra propertytaxes and reserves followed by$10 million ineach of the nextnine years.Doing sowould speed upthe county pay-ing down itsunfunded actuar-ial accrued lia-bility which, asof June 30,2012, stood at$962 million and is 72 percentfunded with annual costs of approximately $150 million.Under the proposed plan comingbefore the Board of SupervisorsTuesday, the county would achieve90 percent funding in seven yearsand 100 percent by fiscal year2023-24.By that point, the recommendedoption would slash the county’sannual required contribution by$13 million and continue toapproximately $16 million by fis-cal year 2041-2042, according tocalculations by County ManagerJohn Maltbie.The county’s pension costs havelong been a concern for officials,residents and even the civil grand jury which in April contended theunfunded liability was probablycloser to $2 billion. The jury alsoclaimed the pension plan hasfailed to achieve assumed rates and
County couldpour $140Minto pensions
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Paper towels are out and elec-tric vehicle charging stationsare in at some county officesunder part of the proposals toaddress deferred maintenanceand improve infrastructureusing Measure Ahalf-cent salestax revenue.The two presentations sched-uled for Tuesday’s Board of Supervisors include some bigticket items — $6 million toupgrade wired and wireless net-works, $16.25 million to builda new emergency dispatch cen-ter, $6 million for a newPescadero fire station and$460,000 to improve govern-ment transparency andaccountability.Measure Awas approved byvoters last fall and the half-cent sales tax is estimated tobring in approximately $60million annually for the next10 years. County supervisorshave spent the past severalmonths hearing presentationson possible uses and, aftermaking tentative decisions onthe requests, will take a finalvote this fall.
Sales tax moneymay upgradecounty IT,buildnew facilities
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Redwood City’s Fair OaksBranch Library will present threesessions of printmaking work-shops for children ages 6 to 12 forfree, but they are currently full dueto space limitations. The instruc-tor, Kathryn Kain, will lead thesessions on Mondays, startingtoday and running on Aug. 12 and19 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.Master printer and artist Kainwill teach children the basics of monoprinting in this workshop,which was made possible by a$1,350 grant provided by the SanFrancisco Foundation.“As a master printer, you workwith artists, and in a way, I gotused to working with people,”Kain said. “I have the skill toteach, and it’s a lot of fun to workwith kids.”Printmaking is a term coveringetching, lithography, silkscreenand monotype — all methods formaking fine art multiples. Kainwill be guiding the kids throughinking Plexiglas plates and print-ing on damp paper through a smallformat etching press.Kain notes printing presses are
Library hosts master printer
PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLES HOUSTON
A student of Kathryn Kain,above,spins the press during a class.Below,Kain,a master printer,works with astudent during a printing session.
 John Maltbie
See
PENSIONS
,Page
20
See
PRINTER
,Page
19
See
TAX
,Page
20
Workshops to focus on a variety of printmaking for children
See
BART
,Page
19
 
Photos of Marilyn Monroe’slast sitting for sale
PHILADELPHIAArare portfolio of photographs from Marilyn Monroe’slast sitting is up for grabs to the high-est bidder.Freeman’s auction house inPhiladelphia estimates the limited-edi-tion portfolio of 10 photos, made fromfashion photographer Bert Stern’soriginal negatives from his June 1962assignment for Vogue, could fetch$10,000 to $15,000 when it goes onthe block Sept. 10.The photos will be on view to thepublic starting Sept. 6, said AimeePflieger, head of the century-old auctionhouse’s photography division.Stern, who died in June at age 83,took more than 2,500 photos of theHollywood icon over three days at theHotel Bel-Air in Los Angeles. The 20-by-20-inch portfolio photos are fromthe first day, when Stern and Monroewere alone before the arrival of a cadreof Vogue staffers, and project a feelingof spontaneity and playfulness thatstands out from the others.“He brought a turntable and speakersand three cases of champagne,” Pfliegersaid. “The feeling you get from thephotos is they’re having a great time.”Six weeks after her session withStern, the 36-year-old screen siren wasfound dead in her home Aug. 5 of anapparent drug overdose. Ahalf-centurylater, she remains one of the 20th-cen-tury’s most enduring sex symbols.Stern’s photos were a sensation,partly because they were taken rightbefore Monroe’s death and partlybecause they included the first nudephotos of Monroe since 1949. Manyof the nudes show the star posing withdiaphanous scarves, paper flowers andpearls in bright but diffuse natural lightthat gives the photos a dreamlike qual-ity.“She was beautiful and untouched,”Stern said. “It was as though she were just beginning.”Monroe is often described in thephotos as projecting an aura of damageand desperation, but Pflieger disagrees.“We project our own thoughts ontothem when we look at them,” shesaid. “To me, they’re soft, beauti-ful, clutter-free images justfilled with light ... they giveyou a real sense of her person-ality and playfulness.”Other Monroe photos arebeing auctioned the same day,including more from the per-sonal collection of theportfolio owner,who the auctionhouse saidwishes toremainanony-mous.Alsogoingon theauction block are nearly 100 photo-graphs from the corporate collectionof cosmetics giant Avon’s headquartersin New York City. The photographs areall by female artists from the 1910s tothe 1990s — from the little known tothe prominent Cindy Sherman andLouise Dahl-Wolfe — and focus onthemes of beauty through the eyes of women.Part of the proceeds from Avon’s auc-tion will benefit the Avon Foundation,which advances efforts related tobreast cancer research and combatingdomestic vio-lence.
FOR THE RECORD2
Monday
Aug.5,2013
THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA94402
Publisher: Jerry LeeEditorin Chief: Jon Mays
 jerry@smdailyjournal.comjon@smdailyjournal.comsmdailyjournal.comscribd.com/smdailyjournaltwitter.com/smdailyjournalfacebook.com/smdailyjournalPhone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.comEvents:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.comNews:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.comDelivery:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.comCareer: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,emailinformation along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar.If you would like to have an obituary printedmore than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actress TawneyKitaen is 52.
This Day in HistoryThought for the Day
1953
Operation Big Switch began asremaining prisoners taken during theKorean War were exchanged atPanmunjom.
“What worries you,masters you.” 
— John Locke,English philosopher (1632-1704).
Actress LoniAnderson is 68.Actor JonathanSilverman is 47.
Birthdays
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Kate MacKay,Esther Picazo and Casimiro Hernandez prepare signs to protest Ross Foti and a group of pro-lifers in South SanFrancisco on Grand Avenue Saturday morning.MacKay had considered traveling to Foti’s Belmont home to protest his useof photographs of stillborns which MacKay finds offensive.She never made it to Foti’s house,however.
Monday:
Cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzlein the morning. Highs in the lower 60s.Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday night:
Cloudy. Patchy fog anddrizzle after midnight. Lows in the lower50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday:
Cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzlein the morning. Highs in the lower 60s. West winds 5 to 10mph.
Tuesday night:
Cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lowsin the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday:
Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in thelower 60s.
Wednesday night through Sunday:
Mostly cloudy.Patchy fog. Lows in the lower 50s. Highs near 60.
Local Weather Forecast
On this date:In 1864
, during the Civil War, Union Adm. David G.Farragut led his fleet to victory in the Battle of Mobile Bay,Ala.
In 1884
, the cornerstone for the Statue of Liberty’spedestal was laid on Bedloe’s Island in New York Harbor.
In 1912
, the Progressive Party, also known as the “BullMoose Party,” convened in Chicago. (The party was formedby former President Theodore Roosevelt following a split inthe Republican Party.)
In 1921
, a baseball game was broadcast for the first time asKDKAradio announcer Harold Arlin described the actionbetween the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Philadelphia Philliesfrom Forbes Field. (The Pirates won, 8-5.)
In 1924
, the comic strip “Little Orphan Annie” by HaroldGray made its debut.
In 1936
, Jesse Owens of the United States won the 200-meter dash at the Berlin Olympics, collecting the third of his four gold medals.
In 1962
, actress Marilyn Monroe, 36, was found dead inher Los Angeles home; her death was ruled a probable suicidefrom “acute barbiturate poisoning.” South African anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela was arrested; it was thebeginning of 27 years of imprisonment.
In 1963
, the United States, Britain and the Soviet Unionsigned a treaty in Moscow banning nuclear tests in theatmosphere, in space and underwater.
In 1969
, the U.S. space probe Mariner 7 flew by Mars,sending back photographs and scientific data.
In 1981
, the federal government began firing air trafficcontrollers who had gone out on strike.
Ten years ago:
Episcopal leaders in Minneapolis voted toapprove the election of the Reverend V. Gene Robinson, anopenly gay clergyman, as bishop of the Diocese of NewHampshire.Actor John Saxon is 77. College Football Hall of Famer andformer NFLplayer Roman Gabriel is 73. Country songwriterBobby Braddock is 73. Actress Erika Slezak is 67. Rocksinger Rick Derringer is 66. Actress Holly Palance is 63.Singer Samantha Sang is 60. Actress-singer MaureenMcCormick is 57. Rock musician Pat Smear is 54. AuthorDavid Baldacci is 53. Actress Janet McTeer is 52. BasketballHall-of-Famer Patrick Ewing is 51. Country singer Terri Clarkis 45. Former MLB player John Olerud is 45. Actor BrendonRyan Barrett is 27.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)SORRYBRAVO BICKER PERMITSaturday’sJumbles:Answer:He was struggling to find a new guitarbecause he was – TOO PICKYNow arrange the circled lettersto form the surprise answer, assuggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,one letter to each square,to form four ordinary words.
SPITYLIPTOSERDYSCIERFE
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
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THE
Ans.here:
Lotto
 The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit,No.9,in first place;Eureka,No.7,in second place;and Lucky Star,No.2,in third place.The race timewas clocked at 1:48.21.
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Monday
Aug.5,2013
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I
n a foray for converts around BolinasBay, a number of children, males, werefound and taken from their families tothe Mission Dolores. Most were around 5years old, but one named Lupugeym was acouple of years older. He was a bright child,clear-minded, determined and quick to per-ceive instruction given to him. He was bap-tized along with the rest at the mission andgiven the Christian names of Jose andPomponio: thus he was named JosePomponio Lupugeym. Most had been givennames of saints, but the names had been sooverused since baptisms at the mission, thatthe fathers, groping for names, called ontheir classical teachings and came up with”Pomponio.” He was a quick learner, as thefathers found out, but a little headstrong attimes. Pomponio was a born leader and theother Indians went to him for advice concern-ing their lives.Things went well at the mission and,because of his leadership abilities, he wasgiven responsible duties that which otherIndians were not entrusted. One day, a fatherin charge of the mission accused him of steal-ing a piece of gold from the altar after a mass.Pomponio was only 9 at this time and every-one knew he did not take it. But he had beenaccused and so the father whipped him with astick to drive out the devil in him. The fatherrelished this duty and the whipping was verysevere. Pomponio pleaded his innocence, butto no avail. Days later, the gold was foundbehind the altar by Indians cleaning thechurch. No matter, Pomponio had been beat-en and had been given extra duty to punishhim.Pomponio was transferred to Mission SanRafael in 1916 in Marin County and givencharge of numerous Indians. These Indianswere not supervised strictly and life waspleasant. Padre Father Amoros was put incharge at San Rafael. He was a firm adminis-trator and this must have been an abruptchange from the relative independence thatthe young men had enjoyed. Word beganleaking out, however, that Pomponio wasabusing the women, taking some for himself for his pleasure and bullying the men whoobjected. Even so, he had a magical qualityabout him and, in spite of this activity, manyIndians looked up to him. Later, however, hehad demanded tribute for certain jobs and beatup one of the Indians. This was too much forthe fathers and one attempted to punish himwith a whip. Pomponio was almost 20 yearsold now and a full-grown man. Pomponio ranaway and headed for the hills.After this event, he began raiding theIndian villages. At first he took only food,but in time he began taking some of thewomen as well. Anumber of other unrulyIndians joined him and he drifted down ontothe Peninsula. His path was marked bykilling, raping and stealing from the Indians.At one time, the soldiers captured him byMission San Miguel and, after tying him up,beat him. Rumor was that Pomponio escapedthat night by cutting off his heels to free hislegs from the shackles. He got away but wascaptured later and taken to Mission Soledad.There, he killed a Spanish soldier and thenescaped. Later, he was seen near Santa Cruz.Alpine Creek became his hideout for atime. When soldiers came looking for him,he escaped again and headed north. WhenGeneral Vallejo heard he was plunderingIndian villages along the Petaluma River onGeneral Vallejo’s property, he sent his sol-diers after him. After chasing him, the sol-diers captured Pomponio near Novato. He wastaken to Monterey at once for punishment.Pomponio was convicted by the Mexicancourt in Monterey of killing the Spanish sol-dier. He was executed by a firing squad in1824.Much of the information in this article wastaken from the book San Francisco Peninsula— Giants on the Land by Darold Fredricks.(Available at Amazon.comISBN # 1-59330-086-7)
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricksappears in the Monday edition of the DailyJournal.
Jose Pomponio — good or bad?
 
PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL HARNEY FROM THE OHLONE WAY, 1978, BY MALCOLM MARGOLIN
 The tranquil life of the native Indians was disrupted by the Spanish.
BELMONT
Hit and run.
Asuspect left the scene after hit-ting a car on Ralston and Villa avenues before10:12 a.m. Wednesday, July 24.
Suspicious circumstances.
Awomanreported she believed someone was poisoningcats in the neighborhood on Mezes Avenuebefore 9:13 a.m. Wednesday, July 24.
Arrest.
Aman was arrested for public intoxi-cation after he vomited on himself while stag-gering on El Camino Real before 8:07 p.m.Tuesday, July 23.
Disturbance.
Aman refused to leave a 7-Eleven after bothering customers on ElCamino Real before 10 p.m. Monday, July 22.
Vandalism.
Graffiti was found on a mailboxon Ralston Avenue before 6:48 p.m. Monday,July 22.
FOSTER CITY 
Assault.
Three people were booked, cited,and released for being involved in a physicalfight on Edgewater Boulevard before 3:02 p.m.Monday, July 29.
Suspicious circumstances.
Someonereported seeing a black Suburban plugged intothe light pole on Shell Boulevard before 12:36p.m. Monday, July 29.
Grand theft.
A60-inch television deliveredby Federal Express on Tuesday, July 23 to anaddress on Bowfin Street was never received.
Police reports
Coin crook
Aman was caught trying to break into acoin operated laundry machine on the600 block of Rollins Road inBurlingame before 11:20 a.m.Wednesday, July 24.

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