Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
96Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Say Everything, by Scott Rosenberg - Excerpt

Say Everything, by Scott Rosenberg - Excerpt

Ratings:

4.42

(71)
|Views: 4,623|Likes:
Blogs are everywhere. They have exposed truths and spread rumors. Made and lost fortunes. Brought couples together and torn them apart. Toppled cabinet members and sparked grassroots movements. Immediate, intimate, and influential, they have put the power of personal publishing into everyone’s hands. Regularly dismissed as trivial and ephemeral, they have proved that they are here to stay.

In Say Everything, Scott Rosenberg chronicles blogging’s unplanned rise and improbable triumph, tracing its impact on politics, business, the media, and our personal lives. He offers close-ups of innovators such as Blogger founder Evan Williams, investigative journalist Josh Marshall, exhibitionist diarist Justin Hall, software visionary Dave Winer, "mommyblogger" Heather Armstrong, and many others.

These blogging pioneers were the first to face new dilemmas that have become common in the era of Google and Facebook, and their stories offer vital insights and warnings as we navigate the future. How much of our lives should we reveal on the Web? Is anonymity a boon or a curse? Which voices can we trust? What does authenticity look like on a stage where millions are fighting for attention, yet most only write for a handful? And what happens to our culture now that everyone can say everything?

Before blogs, it was easy to believe that the Web would grow up to be a clickable TV–slick, passive, mass-market. Instead, blogging brought the Web’s native character into focus–convivial, expressive, democratic. Far from being pajama-clad loners, bloggers have become the curators of our collective experience, testing out their ideas in front of a crowd and linking people in ways that broadcasts can’t match. Blogs have created a new kind of public sphere–one in which we can think out loud together. And now that we have begun, Rosenberg writes, it is impossible to imagine us stopping.

In his first book, Dreaming in Code, Scott Rosenberg brilliantly explored the art of creating software ("the first true successor to The Soul of a New Machine," wrote James Fallows in The Atlantic). In Say Everything, Rosenberg brings the same perceptive eye to the blogosphere, capturing as no one else has the birth of a new medium.
Blogs are everywhere. They have exposed truths and spread rumors. Made and lost fortunes. Brought couples together and torn them apart. Toppled cabinet members and sparked grassroots movements. Immediate, intimate, and influential, they have put the power of personal publishing into everyone’s hands. Regularly dismissed as trivial and ephemeral, they have proved that they are here to stay.

In Say Everything, Scott Rosenberg chronicles blogging’s unplanned rise and improbable triumph, tracing its impact on politics, business, the media, and our personal lives. He offers close-ups of innovators such as Blogger founder Evan Williams, investigative journalist Josh Marshall, exhibitionist diarist Justin Hall, software visionary Dave Winer, "mommyblogger" Heather Armstrong, and many others.

These blogging pioneers were the first to face new dilemmas that have become common in the era of Google and Facebook, and their stories offer vital insights and warnings as we navigate the future. How much of our lives should we reveal on the Web? Is anonymity a boon or a curse? Which voices can we trust? What does authenticity look like on a stage where millions are fighting for attention, yet most only write for a handful? And what happens to our culture now that everyone can say everything?

Before blogs, it was easy to believe that the Web would grow up to be a clickable TV–slick, passive, mass-market. Instead, blogging brought the Web’s native character into focus–convivial, expressive, democratic. Far from being pajama-clad loners, bloggers have become the curators of our collective experience, testing out their ideas in front of a crowd and linking people in ways that broadcasts can’t match. Blogs have created a new kind of public sphere–one in which we can think out loud together. And now that we have begun, Rosenberg writes, it is impossible to imagine us stopping.

In his first book, Dreaming in Code, Scott Rosenberg brilliantly explored the art of creating software ("the first true successor to The Soul of a New Machine," wrote James Fallows in The Atlantic). In Say Everything, Rosenberg brings the same perceptive eye to the blogosphere, capturing as no one else has the birth of a new medium.

More info:

Publish date: Jul 7, 2009
Added to Scribd: May 27, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Buy the full version from:Amazon
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/21/2013

pdf

text

original

 
A
LSO BY
S
COTT
R
OSENBERG
Dreaming in Code:Two Dozen Programmers, Three Years, 4,732 Bugs,and One Quest for Transcendent Software
 
scott rosenberg
HOW BLOGGING BEGAN, WHAT IT’S BECOMING,AND WHY IT MATTERS
say
everything

Activity (96)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
bookwallah reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Thorough, thoughtful cultural analysis of the history of blogging. Particularly enjoyed references to the wilder woollier days of the public Internet as it unfolded in the early 1990s. Recommended read for students of differing communication media and die hard Internet junkies.
dickmanikowski reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Insightful history of blogging as a communication tool. The author examines critiques of the the form and concludes that traditional blogging will survive the competition from newer forms (social networks, Twitter, etc.) in the foreseeable future.
garthburlingham reviewed this
As a self-help book junkie, I compulsively read a lot in this venue. I would rank this book as one of the ten best of the hundreds this sixty year old has read. Why? The author, has travelled the buddhist path, a former Zen monk. He has been qualified as a psychologist. Most impressively, he writes pithily, and penetrates the normal self-help "schlock" to strike at the heart of consciousness change. It penetrates creatively beyond most self help material. And you had better understand what "enlightenment" means to you because you will have a different take on it by the book's end.
dst_14 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Liked the early stuff. My interest dropped off when the book got to around 2004–5, cos that I lived through (in the blog sense) & but the closing chapters were pretty good.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
towiwa liked this
Luca Vlad liked this
Nazrun Nabill liked this
Edwin Gunawan liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd