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TRANSVERSALES by Michael Gessner Book Preview

TRANSVERSALES by Michael Gessner Book Preview

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Published by Geoffrey Gatza
The poems in Michael Gessner’s new collection, Transversales, are formally dazzling—incisive, witty, and smart—but compassion tempers linguistic brilliance. In a series set in Paris, for instance, a visit (against advice) to the “labyrinth of tented markets,” the now-dangerous Market of Seine-Saint-Denis, is punctuated dramatically by fragmented quotations from Victor Hugo’s diary kept during the siege of Paris (1871). Quite simply, I am hooked on this book. Gessner’s poems are glory.

—Cynthia Hogue, author of Or Consequence



There’s music of the mind in Michael Gessner’s Transversales, the investigating intelligence and haunting observations of a flâneur out of Walter Benjamin whose path time travels and intersects the lines of other alienated realities. A deft mastery marks these poems. “The Markets of Seine-Saint-Denis” is a kind of tour de force; a trip to the “home of the homeless” where both the past and the present “are eating the unknown.” I am haunted by his imagery, as when he evokes the rain as “the patterings of an unknown companion, lost and distant, now returned to wrap this house in sheets of itself.” I am struck by his poetic intelligence, as his lines intersect us with a sense of a beingness that is everywhere “political, which means the beast is in costume.”


—Rebecca Seiferle, author of Wild Tongue



Michael Gessner, a former Andrew Mellon professor at the University of Arizona, and Honors Program director at Central Arizona College, lives in Tucson, Arizona with his wife, and their dog, “Irish.” His work has been featured in American Letters & Commentary, American Literary Review, The Journal of the American Medical Association, Oxford Magazine, The Wallace Stevens Journal, Web del Sol, and others. His poems have been nominated twice for a Pushcart Prize and as finalists for “Discovery”/The Nation, and the Pablo Neruda Award. Other information, including book publications, reviews, and readings may be found at: www.michaelgessner.com, or www.pw.org/content/michael_gessner




Book Information:

· Paperback: 102 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-147-4

$16

Pre-Orders Welcome

The poems in Michael Gessner’s new collection, Transversales, are formally dazzling—incisive, witty, and smart—but compassion tempers linguistic brilliance. In a series set in Paris, for instance, a visit (against advice) to the “labyrinth of tented markets,” the now-dangerous Market of Seine-Saint-Denis, is punctuated dramatically by fragmented quotations from Victor Hugo’s diary kept during the siege of Paris (1871). Quite simply, I am hooked on this book. Gessner’s poems are glory.

—Cynthia Hogue, author of Or Consequence



There’s music of the mind in Michael Gessner’s Transversales, the investigating intelligence and haunting observations of a flâneur out of Walter Benjamin whose path time travels and intersects the lines of other alienated realities. A deft mastery marks these poems. “The Markets of Seine-Saint-Denis” is a kind of tour de force; a trip to the “home of the homeless” where both the past and the present “are eating the unknown.” I am haunted by his imagery, as when he evokes the rain as “the patterings of an unknown companion, lost and distant, now returned to wrap this house in sheets of itself.” I am struck by his poetic intelligence, as his lines intersect us with a sense of a beingness that is everywhere “political, which means the beast is in costume.”


—Rebecca Seiferle, author of Wild Tongue



Michael Gessner, a former Andrew Mellon professor at the University of Arizona, and Honors Program director at Central Arizona College, lives in Tucson, Arizona with his wife, and their dog, “Irish.” His work has been featured in American Letters & Commentary, American Literary Review, The Journal of the American Medical Association, Oxford Magazine, The Wallace Stevens Journal, Web del Sol, and oth
The poems in Michael Gessner’s new collection, Transversales, are formally dazzling—incisive, witty, and smart—but compassion tempers linguistic brilliance. In a series set in Paris, for instance, a visit (against advice) to the “labyrinth of tented markets,” the now-dangerous Market of Seine-Saint-Denis, is punctuated dramatically by fragmented quotations from Victor Hugo’s diary kept during the siege of Paris (1871). Quite simply, I am hooked on this book. Gessner’s poems are glory.

—Cynthia Hogue, author of Or Consequence



There’s music of the mind in Michael Gessner’s Transversales, the investigating intelligence and haunting observations of a flâneur out of Walter Benjamin whose path time travels and intersects the lines of other alienated realities. A deft mastery marks these poems. “The Markets of Seine-Saint-Denis” is a kind of tour de force; a trip to the “home of the homeless” where both the past and the present “are eating the unknown.” I am haunted by his imagery, as when he evokes the rain as “the patterings of an unknown companion, lost and distant, now returned to wrap this house in sheets of itself.” I am struck by his poetic intelligence, as his lines intersect us with a sense of a beingness that is everywhere “political, which means the beast is in costume.”


—Rebecca Seiferle, author of Wild Tongue



Michael Gessner, a former Andrew Mellon professor at the University of Arizona, and Honors Program director at Central Arizona College, lives in Tucson, Arizona with his wife, and their dog, “Irish.” His work has been featured in American Letters & Commentary, American Literary Review, The Journal of the American Medical Association, Oxford Magazine, The Wallace Stevens Journal, Web del Sol, and others. His poems have been nominated twice for a Pushcart Prize and as finalists for “Discovery”/The Nation, and the Pablo Neruda Award. Other information, including book publications, reviews, and readings may be found at: www.michaelgessner.com, or www.pw.org/content/michael_gessner




Book Information:

· Paperback: 102 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-147-4

$16

Pre-Orders Welcome

The poems in Michael Gessner’s new collection, Transversales, are formally dazzling—incisive, witty, and smart—but compassion tempers linguistic brilliance. In a series set in Paris, for instance, a visit (against advice) to the “labyrinth of tented markets,” the now-dangerous Market of Seine-Saint-Denis, is punctuated dramatically by fragmented quotations from Victor Hugo’s diary kept during the siege of Paris (1871). Quite simply, I am hooked on this book. Gessner’s poems are glory.

—Cynthia Hogue, author of Or Consequence



There’s music of the mind in Michael Gessner’s Transversales, the investigating intelligence and haunting observations of a flâneur out of Walter Benjamin whose path time travels and intersects the lines of other alienated realities. A deft mastery marks these poems. “The Markets of Seine-Saint-Denis” is a kind of tour de force; a trip to the “home of the homeless” where both the past and the present “are eating the unknown.” I am haunted by his imagery, as when he evokes the rain as “the patterings of an unknown companion, lost and distant, now returned to wrap this house in sheets of itself.” I am struck by his poetic intelligence, as his lines intersect us with a sense of a beingness that is everywhere “political, which means the beast is in costume.”


—Rebecca Seiferle, author of Wild Tongue



Michael Gessner, a former Andrew Mellon professor at the University of Arizona, and Honors Program director at Central Arizona College, lives in Tucson, Arizona with his wife, and their dog, “Irish.” His work has been featured in American Letters & Commentary, American Literary Review, The Journal of the American Medical Association, Oxford Magazine, The Wallace Stevens Journal, Web del Sol, and oth

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Published by: Geoffrey Gatza on Aug 06, 2013
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04/15/2014

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 TRANSVERSALES
M
ICHAEL
G
ESSNER 
 
B L A Z E V O X [ B O O K S ]
Buffalo, New York
 
 
 
 TRANSVERSALESby Michael GessnerCopyright © 2013Published by BlazeVOX [books] All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced withoutthe publisher’s written permission, except for brief quotations in reviews.Printed in the United States of AmericaInterior design and typesetting by Geoffrey GatzaCover Art by First EditionISBN: 978-1
 
-60964-147-4Library of Congress Control Number: 2013942421BlazeVOX [books]131 Euclid AveKenmore, NY 14217Editor@blazevox.org 
p
ublisher of weird little books
 
BlazeVOX [ books ]
blazevox.org 
 
21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10
 
 
 
15
 THE STEPS OF MONTMARTRE, UNFINISHEDBUSINESS & THE TENTH MUSE
 At the base of the stairs of Foyatier, the flâneur with the pincape shuffles a bit, & otherwise remains stationary taking inthe scene—it is unseasonably cool, a late morning, like noother—while artifice is off pursuing the crowd, & promises what it can only promise, a complete thing which is a packetand as a packet it is all it is or could ever be, & promises noother self. It is a political act. It is commerce, the exchangeof utilities consuming a measured period. And here, in latemorning when mist suffuses the steps of Montmartre,the stroller is not a geometer of respectability, rather as in any puritan state, a vagrant, the figure of indolence, the imageof the unfinished work & thus liberation & unformed selves,an operative feature, a prospect from which the tenth muserebels & rebels from this prospect alone, alone as the flâneurin this particular morning at the base of the steps of Foyatierin his pink cape taking it all in. Here, the tenth muse is notSappho or Bradstreet, it is ambition. It is the commoner withready ax, who calls house to house, into the abodes of thepoem, dragging a cornucopia of hearts. Mnemosyne is grieving;Père Lachaise is not coming along as planned, monumentsare in stages of ruin. Clio is to blame. But it is that otherone, the last born, the runaway, the collector, who cannotabide what must remain incomplete & thus the perfections,O Chimaera, the flourish of half and only half of the funerary palm, the one snowflake dissolving on the heat of the adolescent’sarm, the discovery of escalators, the body within the body, will within will, the spikes of light in a cold pond where gold carp gather; what remains on the tongueafter wine or word, or frozen corpse.

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