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Rose, SmallpoxVaccination

Rose, SmallpoxVaccination

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Published by s0metim3s
Dale A Rose, "How did the smallpox vaccination program come about?"
Dale A Rose, "How did the smallpox vaccination program come about?"

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: s0metim3s on Aug 07, 2013
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12/14/2013

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DALE A. ROSE
no.
4
ANTHROPOLOGYof the CONTEMPORARYRESEARCHCOLLABORATORY
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HOW DID THE SMALLPOXVACCINATION PROGRAMCOME ABOUT?
august 2, 2006working paper
 
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Suggested Citation: Rose, Dale A. “How Did the Smallpox Vaccination ProgramCome About? Tracing the Emergence of Recent Smallpox Vaccination Thinking,”
 ARC Working Paper,
No. 4, August 2, 2006
.
Copyright: © 2007 ARCThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CreativeCommons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and  reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
 
 
 ARC Working Paper No. 4
 
How Did the Smallpox Vaccination Program Come About?Tracing the Emergence of Recent Smallpox Vaccination Thinking
 Dale A. Rose
In December 2002 the President of the United States, in light of persistentadvocacy and a gathering consensus within the public health and nationalsecurity communities about imminent biological threats such as smallpox,announced the enactment of the Smallpox Vaccination Program (SVP).
1
Theannouncement represented both the initiation and the culmination of certainsets of processes. On the one hand, a program was about to be put into placewhich, in terms of its scope and the dominant logics guiding it, had no parallelsin the long histories of infectious diseases, public health, and immunization. Itwas, in many respects, the start of a very novel program. The stated purposesof the program, articulated at various points by an assortment of usually seniorofficials, were varied and occasionally contradictory. Some of the discernablepurposes were: 1) to enable the US to respond effectively to an outbreak ofsmallpox in the US, the theoretical possibility of which had become anincreasing source of concern; 2) to protect the public; 3) to strengthen thepublic health system; 4) to contribute toward a general system of
 bioterrorism preparedness
; 5) to foster material readiness related, specifically, to
 smallpox  preparedness
; 6) to facilitate a general push towards domestic and
 public health preparedness
; and 7) to reap the benefit of the program’s deterrenteffect on state or non-state actors considering developing or deployingsmallpox against the US.On the other hand, the SVP was also an outcome – one that, to be sure, was byno means certain. It was the product of a long, occasionally arduous process,characterized in no small measure by attempts to articulate new relationshipsand rationalities for public health, national defense and an embryonic homelandsecurity apparatus. The program was to bring together elements of the nation’svast, if only loosely coordinated, public health infrastructure with additionalelements historically at some distance from the field of public health, including:the US national security and defense apparatus(es), assorted public safetycommunities, “first responders,” the health/medical care communities, anddisaster/emergency management agencies. Under the aegis of a nascenttechnical and political rationality known as
 preparedness
, the SVP was meantostensibly to reflect new thinking about the ways in which existing elements ofthe public health and national security apparatuses could and should map ontoemerging strategic demands. The emergent logic of preparednessdeemphasized orientations towards specific threats, for example emanating
1
The annoucement in its entirety can be found at:http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2002/12/20021213-7.html 

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