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CDC Vital Signs: Progress on childhood obesity

CDC Vital Signs: Progress on childhood obesity

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Published by Statesman Journal
Obese children are more likely to become obese adults and suffer lifelong physical and mental health problems.

Obesity rates in low-income preschoolers, after decades of rising, began to level off from 2003 through 2008 and now are showing small declines in many states. However, too many preschoolers are obese.
State and local officials can play a big part in reducing obesity among preschoolers.
Obese children are more likely to become obese adults and suffer lifelong physical and mental health problems.

Obesity rates in low-income preschoolers, after decades of rising, began to level off from 2003 through 2008 and now are showing small declines in many states. However, too many preschoolers are obese.
State and local officials can play a big part in reducing obesity among preschoolers.

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Published by: Statesman Journal on Aug 07, 2013
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1
www
http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns
Progress onChildhood Obesity
Obese children are more likely to become obeseadults and suffer lifelong physical and mental healthproblems. Obesity rates in low-income preschoolers,after decades of rising, began to level off from 2003through 2008 and now are showing small declinesin many states. However, too many preschoolers areobese. State and local officials can play a big part inreducing obesity among preschoolers.
State and Local Ofcials can:
 
Create partnerships with community members such ascivic leaders and child care providers to make community changes that promote healthy eating and active living. 
Make it easier for families with children to buy healthy,affordable foods and beverages in their neighborhood.
Help provide access to safe, free drinking water in placessuch as community parks, recreation areas, child carecenters, and schools. 
Help local schools open up gyms, playgrounds, and sports
elds during non-school hours so more children can safely 
play. 
Help child care providers use best practices for improvingnutrition, increasing physical activity, and decreasingcomputer and television time.Obesity among low-income preschoolersdeclined, from 2008 through 2011, in 19of 43 states and territories studied.Children who are overweightor obese as preschoolersare 5 times as likely asnormal-weight children to beoverweight or obese as adults.
19
 About 1 in 8 preschoolers is obese*in the US.
1 in 8
Many States Show Declines
5x
* Children are considered obese if their BMI is at or above the95th percentile for children of the same age and sex according tothe 2000 CDC Growth Charts.
See page 4 Want to learn more?
 
 Visit
 
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionDivision of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
 August 2013
 
Problem
2
Too many preschoolersare obese
1.
1 in 8 (12%) preschoolers is obese.
 
 About 1 in 5 (19%) black children and 1 in 6(16%) Hispanic children between the ages of 2 and 5 are obese. 
Obese children are more likely to be obeselater in childhood and adolescence. In theseolder children and adolescents, obesity isassociated with high cholesterol, high bloodsugar, asthma, and mental health problems. 
Children who are overweight or obese aspreschoolers are 5 times as likely as normal- weight children to be overweight or obeseas adults.
2.
Obesity rates among preschoolers areimproving, but there is more work to bedone to continue this downward trend. Among low-income preschoolers(ages 2-4 years) from 2008-2011:
Obesity rates decreased slightly in 19 of 43states and territories. 
Obesity rates increased slightly in 3 of 43states and territories.
Obesity rates did not change in 21 of 43 statesand territories.
Many states and US territories are showing decreases inchildhood obesity 
 WA MTORNV CA UT AZNMID WY NDSDMNIA NEKSTXFLMSLA  AL GA SCNC VA MENY  WIOKMO ARKY ILINMIOH WV MDDENJ VTRICTMA  AK
 
HINHDCPR VICOTNPA 
Decrease*No ChangeIncrease*Not Included
SOURCE: Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System, 2008-2011.*Represents statistically signifcant annual decrease or increase in obesity.To learn more about how childhood obesity is measured, see http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/basics.html.
 
3
 
Start with ahealthy breakfast.
 
Ways topromotehealthwithpreschoolers
 
 
Teacher leads indoor or outdoorphysical activity, and children areserved healthy meals and snacksduring the day.Weight, height, and BMI are measured;nutrition and physical activity counseling areprovided; and nutrition education supportservices are referred when appropriate.Pick up fruits and vegetables tocook for dinner.Children and parents walk to local schoolplayground or neighborhood park to play.
SOURCES: CDC. MMWR. 2009 July; 58(RR-7): 1-26.; AAP, APHA, NCR or Health and Saety in Child Care and Early Education. 2011. nrckids.org;Spear BA, et al. Pediatrics. 2007.

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