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Military Resistance 11H5 Toxic Drug Given to Soldiers[1]

Military Resistance 11H5 Toxic Drug Given to Soldiers[1]

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Published by paola pisi
More than two years has passed, the popular revolution of our people and of our youth has been waged against the corrupt authoritarian regime that has monopolized power,wealth and the public right in Syria, while repressing all independent or opposition political, cultural and social work on behalf of a tiny bourgeois clique. The process of mass impoverishment of the Syrian people has expanded throughthe implementation of wild neo-liberal policies, accelerated during the rule of Bachar Al Assad, which included privatization of sectors such as education and health....
More than two years has passed, the popular revolution of our people and of our youth has been waged against the corrupt authoritarian regime that has monopolized power,wealth and the public right in Syria, while repressing all independent or opposition political, cultural and social work on behalf of a tiny bourgeois clique. The process of mass impoverishment of the Syrian people has expanded throughthe implementation of wild neo-liberal policies, accelerated during the rule of Bachar Al Assad, which included privatization of sectors such as education and health....

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Published by: paola pisi on Aug 10, 2013
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12/13/2013

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Military Resistance:thomasfbarton@earthlink.net 8.6.13
Print it out: color best. Pass it on.
 
Military Resistance 11H5
 
Federal Officials Issue StrongNew Warning About Dangerous Anti-Malaria Drug:
Mefloquine Hydrochloride WasOnce Routinely Given To U.S.Troops”
It Damaged Them Permanently;
 
There Is Also Evidence Suggesting A Link To Violent Behavior, IncludingSuicide”
Military Officials Continued To DismissThe Claims Of Veterans Who InsistedThat The Side Effects Could Be Long-Lasting”
Military officials continued to dismiss the claims of veterans who insisted that theside effects could be long-lasting.Dr. Remington Nevin, an epidemiologist who served in the Army and has been aleading critic of the drug, estimated that hundreds of thousands of U.S. troopshave taken it."Now the military needs to take responsibility to clean up the toxic mess it'screated," he said.
[Thanks to Clancy Sigal, who sent this in.]August 1, 2013 By Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles TimesFederal drug officials have issued a strong new warning about a controversial anti-malaria medication once routinely given to U.S. troops, some of whom say it damagedthem permanently.
 
 The Food and Drug Administration ordered manufacturers of mefloquine hydrochlorideto give the medicine a black box label, the agency's strongest warning, reserved fordrugs with significant risks of serious side effects.
The FDA said that some neurological and psychiatric side effects can last for months or years after a patient stops taking the drug.
 The medication was approved by the FDA in 1989 under the brand name Larium andquickly became a leading drug for preventing and treating malaria — among travelersand the military.While other drugs must be taken daily, one tablet a week of mefloquine offers protectionagainst the sometimes-deadly mosquito-borne parasite, including against strains that areresistant to other medications.But the drug has long carried warnings tying it to dizziness, seizures, insomnia, anxiety,depression and strange dreams. One clinical trial found that 29% of travelers who tookmefloquine experienced at least one of those side effects. There is also evidence suggesting a link to violent behavior, including suicide.Amid growing concerns, the drug fell out of favor over the last decade. Roche, itsoriginal manufacturer, stopped selling Larium in the U.S. in 2008. The generic versionsstill on the market accounted for 226,000 of the 5.4 million U.S. prescriptions for anti-malaria drugs last year, according to IMS Health, which tracks drug trends. The Pentagon, which used the drug widely in Somalia and during the early years of thewars in Iraq and Afghanistan, offered little explanation when it began scaling back itsreliance on mefloquine and eventually recommended that the drug be used only as athird choice.Military officials continued to dismiss the claims of veterans who insisted that the sideeffects could be long-lasting.
The new FDA warning provided those veterans a sense of validation."I almost fell out of my chair when (the news) was forwarded to me," said Greg Alderete, a retired Army lieutenant colonel who blames his chronic balance andmemory problems on the drug, which he took while serving in Somalia in 1993.
Alderete said that in 2008 he started to suspect mefloquine after connecting with otherveterans of Somalia who were experiencing similar symptoms.He eventually helped launch a Facebook group, Veterans Against Larium, which nowhas more than 1,100 members. He said most served in Somalia, but the group has alsoattracted veterans from other wars.Alderete acknowledged that his depression, anger and anxiety could be the result of post-traumatic stress disorder, with which he was diagnosed. But his chronic dizzinessand nausea and an inability to remember words are less easily explained.

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