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Google Searches for Staffing Answers

Google Searches for Staffing Answers

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Published by Daniel Bass
From the Associated Press an Article by Scott Morrison. Jared Klein, Business Intelligence Specialist At The Work Institute [http://www.linkedin.com/in/jklein00], shared this article with me. Thanks Jared!
From the Associated Press an Article by Scott Morrison. Jared Klein, Business Intelligence Specialist At The Work Institute [http://www.linkedin.com/in/jklein00], shared this article with me. Thanks Jared!

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Published by: Daniel Bass on May 30, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/11/2014

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Interesting article about Google. Google and other companies not only shouldtake a quantitative approach in collecting data about their employees but if theygathered qualitative data they would know exactly why an employee is choosingto not affiliate themselves with the company anymore and if they catch thebehavior early enough they could attempt to make changes so the employeewould once again be happy with his or her position.
Google Searches for Staffing Answers
BySCOTT MORRISON Concerned a brain drain could hurt its long-term ability to compete,GoogleInc.is tackling the problem with its
typical tool: an algorithm
.The Internet search giant recently began
crunching data from employeereviews and promotion and pay histories in a mathematical formula
 
Googlesays can identify which of its 20,000 employees are most likely to quit.
Google officials are reluctant to share details of the formula, which is still beingtested. The inputs include information from surveys and peer reviews, andGoogle says the algorithm already has identified employees who felt underused,a key complaint among those who contemplate leaving.Applying a complex equation to a basic human-resource problem is pure Google,a company that made using heavy data to drive decisions one of its "Ten GoldenRules" outlined in 2005.Edward Lawler, director of the Center for Effective Organizations at the Universityof Southern California, said
Google is one of a few companies that are earlyin taking a more quantitative approach to personnel decisions.
"They are clearly ahead of the curve, but a lot of companies are waking up to thefact that there is a lot of modeling that can provide you with critical data onhuman capital," Mr. Lawler said.Associated Press 

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