Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Improving poultry health and production efficiency with probiotics

Improving poultry health and production efficiency with probiotics

Ratings: (0)|Views: 39|Likes:
To avoid diseases resulting from high pathogenic pressure in intensive broiler and turkey housing systems, antibiotic growth promoters have been used in many cases in the past. Since the EU-prohibition of these products, an increasing interest exists for alternatives to support the microbiota in the intestine and for the maintenance of animal health.
To avoid diseases resulting from high pathogenic pressure in intensive broiler and turkey housing systems, antibiotic growth promoters have been used in many cases in the past. Since the EU-prohibition of these products, an increasing interest exists for alternatives to support the microbiota in the intestine and for the maintenance of animal health.

More info:

Published by: Milling and Grain (formerly GFMT) on Aug 13, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/26/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Digital Re-print - July | August 2013
Improving poultry health and productionefciency with probiotics
Grain & Feed Milling Technology is published six times a year by Perendale Publishers Ltd of the United Kingdom. All data is published in good faith, based on information received, and while every care is taken to prevent inaccuracies,the publishers accept no liability for any errors or omissions or for the consequences of action taken on the basis of information published.©Copyright 2013 Perendale Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any formor by any means without prior permission of the copyright owner. Printed by Perendale Publishers Ltd. ISSN: 1466-3872
 
T
o avoid diseases resulting from highpathogenic pressure in intensivebroiler and turkey housing systems,antibiotic growth promoters have beenused in many cases in the past. Sincethe EU-prohibition of these products, anincreasing interest exists for alternatives tosupport the microbiota in the intestine andfor the maintenance of animal health.
Therefore, the use of probiotics hasbeen established. Probiotics are livingcultures of non-pathogenic strains of bacteria and yeasts which are able toinfluence the microbiota in the intestineof the host animal in a positive way (Fuller 1989). Many of the known probiotics areunable to survive the techniques used inmodern feed production, for exampleheat exposure during the pelleting proc-ess of temperatures up to 90°C. Onepossibility to mitigate these problemsis the use of spore forming probiotics,especially probiotics of the genus
Bacillussubtilis
. Also, the compatibility with other feed additives, such as organic acids, coc-cidiostats and antibiotics for therapeuticpurposes, has to be considered ina practical situation.
Mode of action
Potential probiotics are charac- terized by the forming of naturalcolonies with a complex aerobicstructure, which has to be seenin connection with higher bacte-rial possibilities (Image 1). If bacteriaare kept in an artificial environment('domesticated'), they lose many of  their natural capabilities. Thereforeprobiotics can be evaluated in asimple plate test concerning to their efficacy due to their aerobic form(Aguilar 
et al
. 2007).Different modes of action form the basisof the use of 
Bacillus subtilis
in poultry feed,so the influence of improved productionparameters can be explained.
Bacillus subtilis
 consumes oxygen in the digestive tract andproduces different enzymes like, for exam-ple, subtilisin and catalase. As a result, theenvironmental conditions for beneficial bac- teria, such as Lactobacilli, will improve. Thesebacteria colonize the gut wall and block  the binding sites of pathogenic bacteria,a mechanism called competitive inhibition.Additionally, Lactobacilli produce lactic acid,which can affect pathogenic bacteria, suchas, Salmonella,
E. Coli
, Campylobacter andClostridiae (Hosoi
et al
. 2000).Many trial results, concerning the reduc- tion of these pathogens have already beenpublished (Marutra
et al
. 1996, Fritts
et al
.2000, La Ragione and Woodward 2003).For example, Maruta
et al
. (1996) describednot only fewer infected animals in a trial within total 18,000 broilers, but also a reducedconcentration of pathogenic bacteria in thefaeces of infected animals was observed(Table 1).In another research trial in broilers, areduction of campylobacter infection from
Improvingpoultry healthand productionefficiency withprobiotics
by Dr Detlef Kampf Orffa Additives, the Netherlands
Table 1: Influence of 
Bacillus subtilis
C-3102 (Calsporin
®
) on the concentration of 
Clostridiumperfringens
and Salmonella (Maruta
et al 
.
1996)control(9,000 broiler)Calsporin
®
Bacillus subtilis
C-3102(3x108 CFU/kg feed)
Clostridium perfringens
, log10/g faeces3.39±0.792.62±0.47*Cl. perfringens, % positive animals93%47%*Salmonella spp., log10/g faeces2.97±0.363.06±0.62Salmonella spp., % positive animals57%17%** P<0.01
Image 1:
Bacillus subtilis
C-3102 (compact andsingular colony form)
Bacillus subtilis
(incoherent colony form)
Grain
&
feed miinG echnooG20 | July - august 2013
FEATURE

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->