Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
11Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
TUNING THE MIND

TUNING THE MIND

Ratings: (0)|Views: 213 |Likes:
Published by K.PANDU RANGA REDDY
In Indian school of thought the mind has three states Satwic, Rajasic and Tamasic. Simply put they represent a cool – calm, active and dull mind. The book takes 23 aspects and through simple examples tells you what conditions represent each of the three states of mind.

The 23 aspects are split into five chapters namely –

1. Vision, actions, inherent tendencies and duties, intellect.
2. Patience and will, happiness, sleep, the powers of the mind, sense organs.
3. Colors, desires, faith, food, ideals.
4. Charity, renunciation, results hereafter, talk, life and life-styles, awareness.
5. Conclusion – Tuning the Mind.

The book is a guide to Healthy Living. Personally the state of my stomach reflects the state of my mind and the condition of my hair.

The author of the book TUNING THE MIND Swamini Vimalananda is, an eminent disciple of Gurudev Swami Chinmayanandaji and a forceful speaker on Vedanta, presently in charge of Chinmaya Mission, Coimbatore and is one of the directors of Chinmaya International Residential School. She is also director of the “Chinmaya Vision Programme” - a holistic and value-based approach to education.
In Indian school of thought the mind has three states Satwic, Rajasic and Tamasic. Simply put they represent a cool – calm, active and dull mind. The book takes 23 aspects and through simple examples tells you what conditions represent each of the three states of mind.

The 23 aspects are split into five chapters namely –

1. Vision, actions, inherent tendencies and duties, intellect.
2. Patience and will, happiness, sleep, the powers of the mind, sense organs.
3. Colors, desires, faith, food, ideals.
4. Charity, renunciation, results hereafter, talk, life and life-styles, awareness.
5. Conclusion – Tuning the Mind.

The book is a guide to Healthy Living. Personally the state of my stomach reflects the state of my mind and the condition of my hair.

The author of the book TUNING THE MIND Swamini Vimalananda is, an eminent disciple of Gurudev Swami Chinmayanandaji and a forceful speaker on Vedanta, presently in charge of Chinmaya Mission, Coimbatore and is one of the directors of Chinmaya International Residential School. She is also director of the “Chinmaya Vision Programme” - a holistic and value-based approach to education.

More info:

Published by: K.PANDU RANGA REDDY on Jun 01, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as TXT, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/11/2014

pdf

text

original

 
TUNING THE MIND bySwamini VimalanandaIn Indian school of thought the mind has three states Satwic, Rajasic and Tamasic.Simply put they represent a cool – calm, active and dull mind. The book takes 23aspects and through simple examples tells you what conditions represent each ofthe three states of mind.The 23 aspects are split into five chapters namely –1. Vision, actions, inherent tendencies and duties, intellect.2. Patience and will, happiness, sleep, the powers of the mind, sense organs.3. Colors, desires, faith, food, ideals.4. Charity, renunciation, results hereafter, talk, life and life-styles,awareness.5. The Guna Chart and in Conclusion Tuning the Mind.I shall end by saying that the book is a guide to Healthy Living. Personally thestate of my stomach reflects the state of my mind and the condition of my hair. IntroductionEvery effect must have a cause. It naturally follows that the world we experiencemust also have a cause. There are various causes for the various objects,phenomena, circumstances and experiences of the world. For example, a seed givesrise to a tree, condensation causes rain, unfulfilled desires cause frustrationand anger and so on. There may be one or many causes for a phenomenon. Forexample, India won a cricket match because of good fielding, good bowling andindifferent batting by its opponents. But what is the Ultimate Cause – the Causeof all causes – the cause of the entire world and no just a small part or event ofit? Both science and religion seek this Ultimate Cause.Logically thinking, an object, energy or phenomenon of the world cannot be theUltimate Cause of the world since:1. A part cannot create the whole. The finite cannot create the infinite.2. Any object being a part of the world cannot itself be the cause of the world.3. The cause has to precede the effect. The object would have to exist beforethe world came into being and yet all objects are logically a part of creation.These and many other logical fallacies would occur if we assume that an object,form of energy or phenomenon is the Ultimate Cause of the world. Therefore theUltimate Cause cannot be an object or aspect of the world. Then, what is it?Let us first see what the world is. Then we can arrive at its cause by negatingall that the world represents. The creation, universe and world are names forforms and their attributes, which exist within the realms of time and spaces.Therefore, the Ultimate Cause of the creation must be a nameless, formless,quality-less, timeless and space less entity. It is called God in religion andTruth in philosophy.
 
This Truth (Purusha or Brahman) has the unmanifest infinite potential (prakriti)to create the vast universe. This potential first manifests as the five subtleelements (tanmaatras): space (aakaasha), air (vaayu), fire (agni), water (jala)and the earth (prithvi). The elements are called subtle because they cannot beperceived by our sense organs. These subtle elements form the entire subtle worldof our thoughts, emotions, talents and abilities. They then grossify to form thefive gross elements. These form the gross world that we perceive with our fivesense organs (eyes, ears, nose, skin, and tongue) as forms, sounds, smells, touchand taste.If everything has emerged from the same Truth, the same unmanifest potential, thesame subtle and gross elements, then why do we perceive differences? Why is onebrilliant and another dull?Prakriti, the unmanifest potential, inherently has three qualities. These manifestin various ways causing a wide range of differences. For example, tea containsmilk, sugar and tea powder. The various permutations and combinations of thesethree ingredients create a variety of tastes. Similarly, everyone and everythingin the creation is made up of three qualities (gunas): satva, rajas and tamas. Thepermutations and combinations of these three create the vast variety in the world.The main characteristic of satva guna is knowledge (jnaana). Other characteristicsare compassion, faith, love, self-control, understanding, purity, equanimity andmemory. The main characteristic of rajo guna is activity (pravritti). Othercharacteristics are ambition, dynamism, restlessness, haste, anger, jealousy,greed and passion. The main characteristic of tamo guna is inertia (jadatva).Other characteristics are disorganized thinking or behavior, carelessness,laziness, forgetfulness, violence and criminal thoughts.The cause pervades the effect. Hence, these three qualities of prakriti pervadeeverything in the creation. However, when one quality is predominant, the othertwo lie dormant. The inert world of objects is predominantly tamasic. Plantsmanifest more rajo guna than stones do and animals even more than plants. Man canmanifest satva guna to a greater extent than animals, and presiding deities(devatas) even more than man. Even amongst plants, flowers, trees, animals andbirds, some are satvic, others rajasic and yet others tamasic. The tulsi, lotus,peepal (banyan), cow and swan are seen to be more satvic and are, therefore,worshipped in India. The pitcher plant, sunflower, mango tree, monkey and crow aremore rajasic whereas weeds or cactii, babul, the buffalo and the vulture are moretamasic. Look around at the world and try to see these gunas in the beings aroundyou.Human beings too have these three gunas. Different qualities gain dominance atdifferent times, but one of them generally dominates each personality. Hence, wemay categorize people as satvic (satva – dominant) rajasic (rajas-dominant) andtamasic (tamas-dominant). Remember everything we do – the way we sit, eat, walk,talk, work or behave-reflects the quality or mood of the mind. For example, in asatvic mood we eat unhurriedly and neatly; in a rajasic mood hurriedly and barelychewing; while in tamasic mood in a sloppy and lethargic manner.What do we want to be? What is the ideal combination of the gunas we should striveto have?When the strings of a sitar (or any other stringed instrument) are too loose, theyproduce a base and unmusical sound. If they are too tight, they make a squeaky orshrill sound. But when they are tuned right, they produce melodious music.Similarly, if the strings of our mind are too loose (tamo guna-dominant) we aredull, lazy and often negative in our thoughts. If they are too tight (rajo guna-
 
dominant) then despite being ambitious and hard working, we are often tense,worried and unhappy. But when the strings of our minds are tuned right (satvaguna-dominant) then we are poised, successful and happy there is beautiful musicin our lives. Therefore, the formula for success and happiness is – “Not tooloose, not too tight, JUST RIGHT.”When I look at a mirror and see dirt on my face, I wash it off. I enhance my looksby highlighting my good features (guna aadhaana) and reducing or managing itsdefects (dosha apanayana). This book is like a pocketsize mirror. The 23 aspectsexpounded herein are meant to help us look at ourselves and guide us to beautifyour inner selves and lives.Chapter 11. VISION ( DRISHTI )‘Yathaa drishti, tathaa srishti’: As our vision, so the world appears to us. Forexample, when we like a person, we see only the good in them but when we do notlike a person, nothing they do pleases us.Satvic: It is a ‘holistic vision’, which enables us to see the role of variousparts and aspects as within the realm of the totality. This helps us give eachaspect of life its due importance. For instance, if we want to be happy, we mustbe aware that a healthy mind is as important as a healthy body. This visionenables us to see unity in diversity (abhedha drishti), such as ‘all Indians aremy brothers and sisters’ or ‘the whole world is my family’ (vasudhaivakutumbakam). This vision enables man to appreciate the common cause behind variouseffects. Take the example of a doctor who diagnoses the cause of a disease whileexamining its symptoms, or a scientist who discovers the cause behind a chemicalreaction. When man is able to see the essential commonness even while perceivingand responding to the differences in the creation, he learns to identify withothers and loves and serves all selflessly.This idea becomes clear with a few examples. Seeing the common factor ‘I’ in allparts of the body, I love each part equally and serve my entire bodyspontaneously. Lokmanya Tilak, the great freedom fighter, on receiving news of hiswife’s death, while at prison, was able to say, “Presently, I have no time forpersonal sorrow. My country’s sorrow is my sorrow”, because he identified with theentire nation. Saints realize the Truth that “the ‘Self’ (Divinity) in me is the‘Self’ (Divinity) in all”’ and therefore love all as themselves. For example, ShriRamakrishna Paramahamsa viewed even a prostitute as the Divine Mother andprostrated at her feet.Rajasic: It is a ‘partial vision’ wherein certain parts or effects are given undueimportance. In addition, the whole or totality is mistaken for the part. Forexample:- Becoming a doctor or pursuing a particular profession is the goal of one’slife.- Comforts are more important than relationships.- Its is enough to be religious once in a while.- It is more important to look good than to be good.Rajasic vision gives importance and reality only to the differences (bhedadrishti), thereby creating divisions within the family, society and country. Forinstance, the British vision was ‘divine and rule’ which caused the partition ofIndia. Satvic vision makes us share and care whereas rajasic vision, as in theprevious example, separates, breaks up and categorizes people and things based on

Activity (11)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
Suchi Phule liked this
RAHUL liked this
agchess liked this
samaro liked this
ascani liked this
jyotihck liked this
jyotihck liked this
alphaprime liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->