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FREEPRESS 8-16-13

FREEPRESS 8-16-13

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Published by hudgons
Weekly newspaper and legal organ for DeKalb County, GA. Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Tucker and Stone Mountain.
Weekly newspaper and legal organ for DeKalb County, GA. Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Tucker and Stone Mountain.

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Published by: hudgons on Aug 13, 2013
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08/20/2013

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WWW.CHAMPIONNEWSPAPER.COM FRIDAY,
AUGUST 16
, 2013 • VOL. 16, NO. 21 •FREE
• A PUBLICATION OF ACE III COMMUNICATIONS •
Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Tucker and Stone Mountain.
championnewspaper championnewspaper champnewspaperchampionnews
REE 
RESS 
Out of the mouths of babes comnew opportunities in Africa
See Choir on page 15A
 by Kathy Mitchellkathy@dekalbchamp.com
T
he biblical quote “a littlechild shall lead them” reso-nates in the history of theAfrican Children’s Choir (ACC). A humanitarian volunteer driving a small child from his war-torn home in Uganda more than 30years ago was moved to hear thechild break into song. From what thevolunteer called “asimple song of dignity and hope” a project that isimproving the lives of many Africanswas born.Inspired by that event, a choir made up of children from seven Af-rican countries— Uganda, Kenya,Rwanda, Sudan, Nigeria, Ghana andSouth Africa—was formed. Startingin 1984, new groups are organizedcontinually for 12- to 18-month toursof North American and Europe. Theyhave performed at the White House,the United Nations, the Pentagon,and before Queen
Elizabeth
of Eng-land during her Diamond Jubilee cel-ebration. They have been joined onstage by such widely known perform-ers as
Paul McCartney
,
Annie Len-nox
,
Keith Urban
,
Mariah Carry
 and
Michael W. Smith
. ACC voicescan be heard on the soundtrack of the movie
 Blood 
 
 Diamonds
andthe group has been nominated for aGrammy.The current ACC will be at Oak Grove United Methodist Church inAtlanta’s Northlake area later thismonth to perform a program of chil-dren’s songs, traditional spiritualsand gospel favorites. Like all ACCconcerts, the one at Oak Grove UMCwill be free and open to the public.Freewill offerings are taken at the performances to support ACC’s pro-grams.Joining the choir is a tremendousopportunity for an African child froman underprivileged area, explainedUnited States-based leader 
Cath-erine Wake
, who entered the volun-teer program after hearing about itfrom her college roommate.Along with other volunteer chap-erones, Wake, a recent graduate witha degree in education, teaches thechildren while they’re on the road.“In addition to classroom lessons,they get to visit places all over theworld. They get to build their English
Chaperone and teacher Catherine Wake is surrounded by African Children’s Choir mem-bers.
 
Th Champ F P, Fay, Agt 16, 2013 Pag 2A
loCAl news
Residents hold anti-crime events around county
 by Andrew Cauthenandrew@dekalbchamp.comResidents joined together at dozens of events around thecounty Aug. 6 for National Night Out. National Night Out,described by organizers as“America’s night out againstcrime,” is an effort to promotecommunity involvement incrime prevention activities and police-community partnerships.“The intention of National Night Out is to help promoteawareness about things thatcommunities can do to keeptheir neighborhoods safe andsecure, to be a watchful eye, inthe creation of neighborhoodwatches,” said interim DeKalbCounty CEO
Lee
 
May
, who planned to visit 10 communityevents during National NightOut. “In doing that, we knowthat we can help lower theincidences of crime and even tohelp catch those perpetrators of crimes.”At the Target store onLaVista Road, youth hadthe opportunity to practicecrawling low under smokein the DeKalb County Fire
Rescue mobile re safety
house. The county policedepartment showcased “the beast,” a mobile SWAT
response unit outtted with
the latest crime-stoppingtechnology.Representatives fromTarget, the national sponsor for  National Night Out, suppliedhotdogs and other refreshmentsand gave out various prizes.According to organizers, National Night Out is designedto send a message to criminalsthat neighborhoods are
organized and ghting back.
“We are promoting theneed for communities to getinvolved and help us keepDeKalb secure,” May said.“We can’t do it as DeKalbCounty government byourselves. It takes a collectiveeffort by communities and by individuals in partnershipwith DeKalb County to keep itsafe.”May said participantsat one location he visitedwere viewing a PowerPoint presentation “showing thestatistics of crime before theycreated a neighborhood watchand afterwards.”“It was a dynamicdifference in terms of theamount of crime,” May said.“Neighborhood watches dowork and communities gettinginvolved does work in makingour county a safer place.”
DeKalb County re trucks in a Target parking lot were available for children, such as 10-year-old Danielle Retzer, to explore during NationalNight Out.Lithonia Mayor Deborah Jackson selects a rafe ticket as DJ Rob Lyons announces a winner in the event where hotdogs were grilled.
Youth received various goodies and had the opportunity to learn about county services from employees including (right photo) Toni Scott andShirley Stevenson of the county roads and drainage division.From left Kayla Harper, Zian Benton and Heiriss Adams pose during the event. Right, Interim DeKalb CEO Lee May talks to a county employee.Photos by Andrew Cauthen
 
Th Champ F P, Fay, Agt 16, 2013 Pag 3A
local news
Honda donates a dozen bikes to Georgia Piedmont Technical
American Honda Mo-tor Company has donated12 motorcycles to GeorgiaPiedmont Technical College(GPTC) to be used exclu-sively for training motorcyclemechanics students in thecollege’s motorcycle servicetechnology department.“This contribution fromAmerican Honda Motor Company is a tremendousgift that affords our studentsin the motorcycle servicetechnology program an ex-ceptional development of skills and knowledge that’scrucial to their success in themotorcycle repair industry,”stated Dr.
Jabari Simama
,GPTC’s president during anAug. 6 announcement of thedonation.“These kinds of donationsare critical to our ability toendow our students with thecaliber of training and skillsnecessary to sustain a pro-ductive workforce now andin the future,” Simama said.“We cannot thank AmericanHonda enough for select-ing Georgia Piedmont as the benefactor of their generos-ity.”Recognizing the valueand necessity of developing atechnically skilled workforceto maintain its products,American Honda has been alongtime supporter of Geor-gia Piedmont, according to anews release from the GPTC.“American Honda is pleased to have Honda based products become part of thetraining curriculum at Geor-gia Piedmont,” said
WilliamHanson
, manager of Honda’smotorcycle communications
and training ofce. “We are
encouraged to see studentswho are interested in motor-cycle repair techniques andhope the [motorcycles] willassist in providing the stu-dents the experience neces-sary to be successful in themechanical repair of Hondamotorcycles.”Although Honda and other motorcycle manufacturershave given bikes and curricu-lum materials to GPTC in the
 past, ofcials said this is therst time that the college has
received a large number of the same kind of bike at onetime. The motorcycles arecollectively valued at morethan $6,000.“This is great” said
MikeSachs
, head of the college’s program.
 
“Being able towrite some lessons aroundthese bikes, with all the stu-dents doing the same thingat the same time is going to be a treat, especially for my beginning students.”Sachs said his students
will rst perform mainte
-nance and repairs on the bikes and then completelydisassemble them and use the bike’s components for over-haul training.Georgia Piedmont’smotorcycle service technol-ogy program is a one year sequence of classes that pre- pares students for positionsin the motorcycle repair in-dustry. The program empha-sizes mechanical theory and practical experience and in-cludes classes in basic skills,maintenance, engines, chas-sis systems, electrical sys-tems, fuel systems, as well asan internship experience.
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121121119
121L121L
Route
119
-
Kensington/ Hairston Rd.
Route
121
-
Stone Mountain/ Memorial Dr.
Route
121L
-
Stone Mountain/ Memorial Dr. Limited
(Former 520-Ltd.)
121L
- Stops
P
MARTA introduced an express service BRT along Memorial Drivein 2010 that operated during morning and afternoon peak commutehours, and supplemented the current Route 121 bus service.Based on customer feedback,
effective August 24th
, MARTA is
discontinuing the 521 Q Express
and adding more frequency to LocalRoute 121-Stone Mountain/Memorial. The service frequency for Route121 will improve from 15-minutes to 12-minutes during peak periods.Off-peak hours will remain at 20-minutes.The 520 Q Limited will continue operating weekdays during peak AM andPM every 10 minutes but will be renamed Route 121L–Stone Mountain/ Memorial Drive “Limited”. Additionally, the new 121 “Limited” will nowserve the Goldsmith Park & Ride lot, WalMart, and one additional busstop along Central Drive, but it will no longer travel north of CentralDrive. Please refer to map for details.
MODIFIED
 
MEMORIALDRIVE
ROUTES
 
MEMORIAL DRIVE ROUTE RECONFIGURATIONEffective August 24th
Top and bottom left, Dr. Jabari Simama, president of Georgia Piedmont Technical College, greet students who are ready to begin training on the Honda motorcycles. The Honda companydonated a dozen bikes to the school’s motorcycle service division. Photos provided.At podium, Simama said Honda’s gift will help students to productive inthe workforce. 

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