Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Tearing the Safety Net: The Devastating Impact of Losing Brooklyn's Largest Private Psychiatric Provider

Tearing the Safety Net: The Devastating Impact of Losing Brooklyn's Largest Private Psychiatric Provider

Ratings: (0)|Views: 742|Likes:
Published by Bill de Blasio
A new report released by Public Advocate Bill de Blasio warns of devastating consequences if Interfaith Medical Center closes, eliminating vital psychiatric services. Interfaith is Brooklyn’s largest private provider of psychiatric care, with 67,000 patients receiving out-patient care and 1,750 in-patient hospitalizations each year.
A new report released by Public Advocate Bill de Blasio warns of devastating consequences if Interfaith Medical Center closes, eliminating vital psychiatric services. Interfaith is Brooklyn’s largest private provider of psychiatric care, with 67,000 patients receiving out-patient care and 1,750 in-patient hospitalizations each year.

More info:

Published by: Bill de Blasio on Aug 16, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/28/2014

pdf

text

original

 
 
 
Interfaith Hospital is the
Brooklyn’s
largestprivate provider of in-patient psychiatriccare.
Right now, it is in bankruptcy, andteetering at the brink of closure. According tofilings with the Federal bankruptcy court,Interfaith will close its Emergency Room onSeptember 14
th
, and end inpatient programs onSeptember 15
th
.
1
  A closure of Interfaith would be a grievous blowto psychiatric care in Brooklyn. It would place
Brooklyn’s psychiatric safety net dangerously
overcapacity. It would deny access topsychiatric and quality mental health carebased entirely on where a person lives, not thetype of care they need.This is a City responsibility.
Mayor Bloomberg’s silence on hospital closures is untenable.
Losing Interfaith wouldhave a devastating impact on psychiatric care in Brooklyn and Queens, and threatens to overwhelm City psychiatricservices at public hospitals already burdened by crowding. The State has a moral and legal obligation to consider and minimize the dire consequences of a closure that does not retain net psychiatric capacity and ensure thatpeople seeking psychiatric care in Brooklyn are not left on their own.
2
 
Interfaith Serves a Population In Particular Need of Psychiatric Care
The people who live in the area surrounding Interfaith and who use it as their community hospital (the “catchmentarea”) are particularly in need of psychiatric services, compared to those in other boroughs, or even other Brooklyn
neighborhoods.Brooklyn residents are more likely to use inpatient psychiatric services than the statewide average, 5.8 per 10,000versus 5.0 per 10,000.
3
At Interfaith in particular, those admitted to the hospital for injuries or physical illness areoften
also
suffering from psychiatric health issues requiring special care or admission to inpatient psychiatricservices. Sixty percent (60%) of all patients discharged from Interfaith hospital have a psychiatric condition as either the principal diagnosis, or as a comorbidity, compared to 27% across Brooklyn.
4
 
Interfaith is the Largest Voluntary Provider of Inpatient Psychiatric Care in Brooklyn 
This closure would have serious consequences for the provision of psychiatric care in Brooklyn. Interfaith is the
1
 
Nina Bernstein, “Interfaith Medical Center Plans to Close,” NY Times, July 31, 2013.
2
 
New York State Department of Health Regulation §709.1(6), outlining that a determination of a public need in the case of “the
reduction or 
elimination of a service”
 
should be guided by “the extent to which need will be met adequately and the effect of the
reduction, elimination, or relocation of the service or facility on the ability of the low-income persons, racial and ethnic minorities, women, handicapped person, and other 
underserved groups, and the elderly, to obtain needed health care.” See also, NY
Public Health Law § 2801-g, requiring the Commissioner to
consider and receive public input on “the anticipated impact of the general hospital's closure on access to health care serv
ices by members of thesurrounding community, including but not limited to recipients of medical assistance for needy persons, the uninsured, and underserved
populations, and options and proposals to ameliorate such anticipated impact.”
 
3
 
Medicaid Redesign Team Brooklyn Health Systems Redesign Working Group, “At th
e Brink of Transformation: Restructuring the Healthcare
Delivery System in Brooklyn,” November 2011. Available at
4
Ibid.
 
largest private provider (and third overall largest provider) of inpatient psychiatric care in Brooklyn, with more than1750 annual psychiatric discharges, and 120 inpatient beds devoted to psychiatric care.
5
These beds account for 13.5% of the total inpatient psychiatric capacity in the borough.
6
The hospital also handles approximately 67,000outpatient psychiatric patients each year.
7
 
Two public hospitals operated by the City of New York’s Health and Hospital Corporation, Kings County Hospital
Center and Woodhull Medical & Mental Health Center, have 452 and 435 beds, respectively. These hospitals arefull: on an average day they operate at 96% (Kings County) and 94% (Woodhull) capacity.
Losing Interfaith’s Psychiatric Capacity Would
Overburden Surrounding Hospitals.91% Capacity on an Average Day Would Rise to 107% Overcapacity.
Without the services available at Interfaith,
Brooklyn’s psychiatric in
-patient capabilities would go from strained todangerously over-capacity. An analysis of 2011 data by the Public Advoca
te’
s Office shows that, on an averageday, Brooklyn inpatient psychiatric beds are 91% full. If Interfaith were to close, a thin surplus of beds would turninto a deficit
 –
with the total number of inpatients seeking care on an average day equal to 107% the number of available inpatient beds available.
8
 On an average day, 714 people are receiving inpatient psychiatric care in Brooklyn hospitals, a total of 10,141psychiatric discharges each year. In 2011, Brooklyn had 889 inpatient psychiatric beds with approximately 810people receiving inpatient psychiatric care at any given day, an occupancy rate of approximately 91.2%.In the past year, Brooklyn has already lost over 100 psychiatric inpatient beds at Coney Island Hospital, as a resultof damage from Superstorm Sandy, and at Long Island College Hospital (LICH), as a result of contentious closureof that institution by the State University of New York.
 A loss of Interfaith’s additional 120
inpatient psychiatric beds, which are currently operating at 95.7% occupancy,would mean the number of people needing inpatient psychiatric care in Brooklyn would be equal to 107% theavailable 2011 capacity, and 122% the available capacity assuming the patients who were once psychiatricinpatients at LICH and Coney Island are currently seeking care in Brooklyn as well.Two other struggling Brooklyn hospitals
 –
Brookdale Hospital Medical Center and Kingsbrook Jewish MedicalCenter, for an additional 100 inpatient psychiatric beds. Based on the average daily occupancy of these psychiatricfacilities, the loss of these hospitals (in addition to Interfaith, Coney Island, and LICH) would yield an overcapacity of approximately 143% -- a staggering mismatch between people in need of serious psychiatric care, currently offeredby inpatient services, and the capacity to help them.
Other Private
Hospitals Rely on Interfaith’s
Psychiatric Services to Provide Care to Their Patients
Other providers in Brooklyn without their own psychiatric capacity rely on Interfaith provide care to their patients.For example, in 2012, Interfaith reached an agreement with Wyckoff Heights Medical Center to be the sole provider 
5
Psychiatric inpatient discharges, a measure of the volume of inpatient services provided by a facility, was 1773 in 2011, the most recent dataavailable from the New York State Office of Mental Health. Available at http://bi.omh.ny.gov/cmhp/dashboard#tab5 .
6
Based on 2011 data from the New York State Department of Health. Bed capacity for Coney Island Hospital, which closed due to damagerelated to Superstorm Sandy. It also does not include inpatient psychiatric capacity once available at Long Island College Hospital (LICH).
7
 
Nina Bernstein, “Brooklyn Hospital Closings a Blow to Psychiatric Care,” NY Times August 1, 2013.
8
2011Medicare Cost Reports.
 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->