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L.a. Times Reveals That Purdue Pharma Knowingly Concealed Database of Bad Doctors

L.a. Times Reveals That Purdue Pharma Knowingly Concealed Database of Bad Doctors

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Published by: Thavam on Aug 17, 2013
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06/16/2014

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Marianne Skolek Salem-News.com-
Aug-15-2013
Purdue Pharma has reaped close to $30 billion in profits sincethe launch of OxyContin in 1996. Some of these profits weregained from the doctors on a list that Purdue Pharma has notreleased to authorities.
(MYRTLE BEACH, SC) - This week"L.A. Times" reporters ScottGlover and Lisa Girion broke anews story that the maker of thedeadly drug, OxyContin, PurduePharma, has a list of "about"1,800 doctors who may haverecklessly prescribed the highlyaddictive drug to addicts anddealers. The problem is PurduePharms has not been alertingauthorities to their list of "baddocs." Here is the link to thearticle
.Despite having this informationthat could have saved hundredsof thousands of people fromdeath and addiction, Purdue Pharma has reaped close to $30 billion inprofits since the launch of OxyContin in 1996. Some of these profitswere gained from the doctors on the list that Purdue Pharma has notreleased to authorities.Purdue Pharma, their funded pain foundations as well as Partnershipfor a Drug Free America a/k/a Partnership at a Drug Free. org.(Partnership) and advocacy groups profiting from Partnership havelong focused on the prescription drug epidemic being caused bypharmacy robberies, doctor shopping and the famous "empty yourmedicine cabinets" and drug collection days. I have never bought
 
what Partnership was selling. Now the "L.A. Times" reveals thatPurdue Pharma knowingly concealed the fact that they had a database of bad docs, I am not convinced that there may be 1,800 baddocs in the data base. My guess would be there are thousands more.Robin Abrams, Purdue Pharma attorney said their data base was tosteer its sales reps away from the risky doctors -- and policing thedocs was not Purdue's responsibility. She further stated that thepharmaceutical company had alerted law enforcement or medicalregulators to approximately 8% of the bad docs named in the database. Criminal? There is more.Abrams also believes that Purdue Pharma wanted to wait to sharetheir suspicions when the analysis "showed some scientific validity" toits theories about the bad docs -- and they were convinced they weredoing everything right for the right reasons.Are you aware Ms. Abrams that when OxyContin first resulted in hugeprofits for Purdue Pharma, a lead counsel/executive for the companyasked his secretary to search the Internet in order to confirm rumorsthey were hearing about problems of addiction, abuse and death withtheir blockbuster drug? The efficient secretary found so muchevidence of an early problem with OxyContin that she prepared areport and put a copy on the desks of executives of thepharmaceutical company. When her boss discovered what she did, heordered her to retrieve every copy of the report she prepared anddestroy them. Yes Ms. Abrams there was cause when OxyContin wasfirst launched to "share their suspicions" -- Purdue Pharma chose tocover it up.You might not also be aware Ms. Abrams that Purdue Pharma has aningenious patent that destroys emails and documents. A virus in theform of a Trojan horse is attached to files. It is a self-destructiondocument or email messaging system that automatically destroysdocuments or email messages at a predetermined time by attaching a"virus" to the document or email message. The virus contains aportion of executable code or an executable program which instructsthe computer to overwrite and/or delete the file to which the virus isattached at a desired time. Since the virus is attached to the file, itwill travel with the file even when the file is copied, forwarded, orsaved to disks or tape drives. Right out of Mission Impossible -- butwhy add the extra feature of a virus? What could Purdue Pharma betrying to hide?
 
Think the "virus" might be applied to the data base of bad docs, Ms.Abrams?The "L.A. Times" reported that starting in 2002 Purdue's sales repswere trained to report "red flags" in doctors' offices such as youngpatients, long lines, people nodding off in waiting rooms and frequentcash transactions. Purdue attorneys review their reports and if adoctor's practice is deemed too risky, the company bars salesrepresentatives from marketing to the physicians. The suspect doctorsare removed from the company's numbered sales territories andassigned to the database, known as "Region Zero." If this data basedoes still exists at Purdue Pharma and hasn't been destroyed by theirpatented "worm" it might be better called "Region Death" rather than"Region Zero."Also, Ms. Abrams you may find it interesting that not only was thelate Howard Udell general counsel at Purdue Pharma, but he was alsoan "inventor." Udell pleaded guilty to misleading physicians andpatients about the dangers of OxyContin. So when Purdue Pharma isasked to produce the "bad doc data base" will they reply "Wish wecould have complied, but you see we have this patent -- and all thatinformation was destroyed by a virus. Did we do something wrong --again?"Here is the patent information with Purdue Pharma's General Counsel,Howard Udell's name on it. Inventors:Udell, Howard R. (US)Baker, Stuart D. (US)Kappel, Cary S. (US)Sherman, Greg M. (US)Ries, William (US)Application Number:EP19980934143Publication Date:05/17/2000Filing Date:06/16/1998State Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance, Cal.) said he sent a letter to Purdueasking the company to disclose the names of California doctors in itsdatabase. State Sen. Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord, Cal.) said hewould join Lieu in making the request of Purdue.

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