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Pirate Hunter

Pirate Hunter

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3.71

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Excerpt of Pirate Hunter by Tom Morrisey, published by Bethany House Publishers

West Indies, 18th century
Young Ted Bascombe is rescued by notorious pirate Captain Henry Thatch, finding himself caught up in a world of crime, adventure, and a daily fight for freedom....

Key West, 21st century
Marine archaeologist Greg Rhode embarks on a treasure-hunting expedition in the turquoise waters of the Florida Keys, but he's as beguiled by a beautiful diver with different-colored eyes as by the lure of pirate gold....

Brilliantly interweaving these two stories, pro deep-sea diver Tom Morrisey spins a multilayered tale of two young men's quests to escape their past by losing themselves to adventure on the high seas. Romantic and thrilling, this unique novel explores the timeless truth that "where your treasure is, there your heart will be also."
Excerpt of Pirate Hunter by Tom Morrisey, published by Bethany House Publishers

West Indies, 18th century
Young Ted Bascombe is rescued by notorious pirate Captain Henry Thatch, finding himself caught up in a world of crime, adventure, and a daily fight for freedom....

Key West, 21st century
Marine archaeologist Greg Rhode embarks on a treasure-hunting expedition in the turquoise waters of the Florida Keys, but he's as beguiled by a beautiful diver with different-colored eyes as by the lure of pirate gold....

Brilliantly interweaving these two stories, pro deep-sea diver Tom Morrisey spins a multilayered tale of two young men's quests to escape their past by losing themselves to adventure on the high seas. Romantic and thrilling, this unique novel explores the timeless truth that "where your treasure is, there your heart will be also."

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Publish date: Jul 1, 2009
Added to Scribd: Jun 04, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/28/2014

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ONE
\u201cI \ue001avor the red ribbons because they look like blood.\u201d
The pirate worked as he spoke, plaiting thin lengths o\ue000 crimson

silk into the raven hair o\ue001 a wig on its tabletop stand. His own hair was almost exactly the same color o\ue001 black, but closely cropped, the short growth even, suggesting that he had shaved his head a

\ue000ortnight or two back. His beard, on the other hand, was thick
and long, the ends o\ue001 it bleached to a lighter brown by salt air and
sun. Every strand had been combed and lightly dampened with
sperm-whale oil, the scent o\ue001 it warm and very nearly spicy in the
small, close cabin o\ue001 the sloop.
The pirate stepped back a bit to look at his work, leaning
naturally to keep his \ue001ooting as they canted over onto a \ue001resh heel.
Above their heads, the ship groaned and creaked with the turn,
the mate\u2019s commands coming through the wooden bulkheads as
a series o\ue001 curt, mu\ue001fed shouts.
The pirate gazed down his nose at the bare\ue000oot and bare-
chested \ue000\ue001teen-year-old on the other side o\ue001 the table. The younger

man\u2019s skin was a deep chocolate brown, almost as dark as his jet- black hair, a \ue001act that made his eyes appear larger than they were, giving him the appearance o\ue001 an innocent.

\u201cWhy do you think that is, boy?\u201d
1
12
Tom morrisey
The young man startled and stood a little straighter. \u201cSir?\u201d
\u201cThe ribbons, boy.\u201d The man\u2019s voice was a calm baritone. \u201cWhy
would I \ue001avor ribbons that resemble blood?\u201d
The younger man kept his eyes \ue000xed on those o\ue001 the pirate

but canted his head slightly down and to his right, a mannerism he had when he knew the answer to something but was thinking it through, just to be certain. Lips still closed, he took a quick dart o\ue001 breath through his nose.

\u201cBecause a \ue000erce man, streaming blood but on the attack,
would present a most \ue000rightening aspect, Captain. Because a person

so startled would hesitate in his own de\ue001ense, and a moment o\ue001 hesitation is an opportunity in which to attack. At very least that is how I see it, sir.\u201d

The pirate stopped his work and touched an index \ue000nger to his
lower lip. \u201cTell me, boy\u2014have you been speaking with my crew,
discussing my manners, my ways?\u201d
His companion shook his head. \u201cNo, sir. The crew doesn\u2019t
talk about you. The crew doesn\u2019t talk about anything but women
and riches and rum.\u201d
The captain laughed. \u201cAnd which o\ue001 those three interests you?\u201d
\u201cThe riches, Captain.\u201d

The pirate laughed again and started another ribbon into the wig. He turned it to look at his work. The younger man watched and then cleared his throat.

\u201cMight I ask you something, Captain?\u201d
The captain li\ue000ted a single eyebrow\u2014his right. \u201cYou cannot
learn i\ue001 you do not ask.\u201d
\u201cYes, sir. Thank you, sir.... When you took the slaver? When

you took the crew . . . ?\u201d
\u201cYes?\u201d
\u201cYou sold all the rest o\ue001 the . . . cargo. Yet you did not sell me.

Why?\u201d

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jenniferbogart reviewed this
Rated 3/5
When Ted Bascombe is rescued from a slave ship by a notorious 18th century West Indies pirate (under the guise of operating as a privateer), he finds himself in an unlikely apprenticeship as he learns the arts of navigation and piracy. Flashing ahead several hundred years, marine archaeologist Ted Rhodes lands himself a job in the mysterious world of underwater treasure hunting and antiquity recoveries where he puts his extensive scuba-diving experience to good use.Pirate Hunter has a lot of good things going for it. Tom Morrissey skillfully weaves the stories of Ted Bascombe and Greg Rhode together, drawing striking parallels out of lives existing centuries apart. The story is found not so much in the treasure-hunt, the capturing of prizes, or the recovery of sunken artifacts, but rather in the emotional journeys taken by Ted and Greg as they journey through pasts filled with pain into the clearer waters of forgiveness.The two intertwined stories were meshed incredibly well and were what kept me in on the story right through until the end. The rather poor handling of the romantic storylines just served to jar me from the rest of the story rather than enhancing it. It is fairly common for male authors to sort of fudge up the romantic sub-plots and it can seem that they are only inserted to sell any possible female readers. That is the way the romance comes across in Pirate Hunter. Greg really seems a bit of a loser – noncommittal emotionally and to faith, what Sheila sees in him remains a mystery to me. Ted’s courtship on the other hand is sweetly traditional – and I loved reading those parts – but the actual emotional buy-in never arrived.I was struck by the similarities between some of the characters with popular big-screen pirate heroes (Pirates of the Caribbean anyone?) These are more understated and realistic, and are grounded firmly in historically accurate piracy as opposed to the fantastical, but I couldn’t keep myself from drawing a comparison. Tom Morrissey draws upon his own extensive deep-sea diving experiences to provide a lot of technical detail for the treasure hunting scenes, and his research into nautical terms is just as impressive.So, while I had to deduct some points for the romances that just didn’t fly for me, this was still a very enjoyable, and even at times humorous read. If you are in the mood for some nautical adventure and don’t need the wind of romance to fill your sails you might want to check this one out.Reviewed at quiverfullfamily.com
cherryblossommj_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This novel is not incredible, but very enjoyable. Each page and chapter keeps a reader thirsting for what comes next. In a way this is both a contemporary novel and a historical. Just about every other chapter is in two different stories that are very different, but at the same time similar in theory and lesson. The characters are easy to come to admire and appreciate even the proverbial "bad guys". At times in some chapters there were parts where I felt that I was overrun with information, but then in the next part of the story I felt those two page of words were necessary after all even though while reading through them I slightly lost interest. One of the best skills as a writer that I enjoyed while reading my first novel from Tom Morrisey was the way that he opened a next chapter going from one century to another and truly weaving the stories together in a way that fit perfectly. Over all this is a pretty great book that really gets a reader into the world of contemporary treasure hunters and opens a port hole of insight into the world of repentant pirates. I recommend it.
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