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True For You, But Not For Me

True For You, But Not For Me

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Excerpt from True For You, But Not For Me by Paul Copan, published by Bethany House Publishers

Apologetics authority Paul Copan tackles popular sayings that often leave Christians speechless, such as "All religions lead to God," "Who are you to judge others?" or "Jesus was just another great religious leader." He provides readers with thoughtful explanations of anti-Christian slogans and brief answers to help them continue their conversations with non-Christians. In addition, Copan answers questions about the unevangelized.
Excerpt from True For You, But Not For Me by Paul Copan, published by Bethany House Publishers

Apologetics authority Paul Copan tackles popular sayings that often leave Christians speechless, such as "All religions lead to God," "Who are you to judge others?" or "Jesus was just another great religious leader." He provides readers with thoughtful explanations of anti-Christian slogans and brief answers to help them continue their conversations with non-Christians. In addition, Copan answers questions about the unevangelized.

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Publish date: Jun 1, 2009
Added to Scribd: Jun 04, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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08/21/2013

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iNTrOdUCTiON
It’s absolutely true that most American adults don’t believe in absolute
truth. They nd it hard to believe that something can be universally true or all people. Dierent persons or cultures may disagree, but
each belie is still true . . . well,
 for 
 
them
! The same goes or morality:In 2002, the Barna Group ound that 83 percent o American teenagerssaid moral truth depends on circumstances (only 6 percent said objec-
tive moral values exist); 75 percent o adults (ages 18–35) claimed to
embrace moral relativism.
1
That same year, the National Association o Scholars/Zogby Inter-
national surveyed college students, o which 97 percent said their schools
were preparing them to behave ethically in their uture workplace. Atrst, this sounds antastic—nally, a bit o good news, right? Keep read-
ing: 73 percent o those said their proessors taught that objective moralstandards o right and wrong don’t exist. Three out o our academicians
 believe that “what is right and wrong depends on dierences in individual
values and cultural diversity.”
2
No wonder Harvard University’s businessschool dropped its ethics course. It’s hard to take business ethics seriously 
when the sponsoring institution endorses philosophical relativism.
3
 Americans have been stuck in the relativistic swamp or quite a
while now. In 1955, when Christian philosopher Alvin Plantinga attended
graduate school at Yale University, his classmates looked like a zoo-ullo diverse philosophical animals. But all this diversity—a happy elbow-rubbing o existentialists, pragmatists, positivists, and the like—had an
 
12
TrUe fOr yOUBUT NOT fOr Me
unhappy side eect. Whenever the question “What is the
truth
about
this matter?” came up, it was dismissed as naïve.
4
Plantinga’s experience illustrates a central point in Allan Bloom’s
(1930–1992) later landmark book 
The Closing of the American Mind
: “Thereis one thing a proessor can be absolutely sure o.” Perhaps this is sounding 
amiliar: “Almost every student entering the university believes, or says
he believes, that truth is relative.”
5
Relativism is a knowledge-denying 
claim: i.e., that truth-claims are really just opinions or culturally shapedperspectives. Facts, moral precepts, or values can be “true or you” andat the same time “not true or me.” Relativists stoutly deny that objec-tive universal truth exists.
 At open orums on university campuses, in classrooms, in coee-
house discussions, and during airplane conversations, I’ve heard tons
o relativistic and “postmodern” slogans. So I’ve written in response to
them, covering a wide range o catchphrases in my popular-level volumes
(
When God Goes to Starbucks, “That’s Just Your Interpretation,”
 
“How Do
You Know You’re Not Wrong?”
) and in this book.
6
In doing so, I have beenseeking to respond to a desperate need. All too oten, I nd Christiansscurrying or cover when red upon with expressions like:“Christianity’s true or you, but not or me.”
•
“That’s just
•
 your 
perspective.”“Who are
•
 you
to judge that person?”“You can’t legislate morality.”
•
“You can do whatever you want just as long as it doesn’t hurt
•
anybody.”“Christianity is just one path among many to God.”
•
“Belie in Jesus as the only way to God is totally intolerant.”
•
Many Christians struggle to respond to relativism, to express their aith boldly, and to live aithul lives in a morally discouraging culture.
Toward that end and beyond, my books don’t only address relativism and

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