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Summary 03.Howley

Summary 03.Howley

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Published by: National Education Policy Center on Aug 18, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/26/2015

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E
DUCATION
 P
OLICY
 S
TUDIES
 L
ABORATORY
Education Policy Research Unit
EPSL
 
|
 
S
CHOOL
EFORM
P
ROPOSALS
: T
HE
ESEARCH
E
VIDENCE
 
S
MALL
S
CHOOLS
 
B
Y
C
RAIG
H
OWLEY
 
ERIC C
LEARINGHOUSE ON
URAL
E
DUCATION AND
S
MALL
S
CHOOLS
, AEL
 Research Quality
 Despite widespread interest in small schools, the research literature is thin. The bestempirical work is found research by Herbert Walberg and colleagues;
 
 by Valerie Lee andcolleagues; and by Craig Howley and colleagues. Evidence on the effectiveness of Schools-Within-A-School – a strategy to reduce school size within existing large school buildings – isnegligible.
 Research Findings
 Defining Small Schools:
School size norms vary tremendously. Total enrollments of 400 or fewer students in high school and 200 or fewer in K-8 or K-6 elementary schools can beconsidered small. Enrollment per grade measures school size more accurately than totalenrollment.
Upper Limits of Size:
Opinions about the upper limits of school size range widely, from 300to 1,000, relying on varying sources of authority from research to practice. Legislation andother government policy has also addressed the issue; for instance, Florida law now limitsnew schools to 900 students for high schools, 700 for middle schools, 500 for elementaryschools.
The Walberg Team:
The influence of district size is several times as great as school size.School and district size have been rigorously and consistently identified as negativeinfluences on achievement. Smaller schools and districts might also be socially advantageousregardless of socioeconomic status, and equity and excellence might reinforce one another.
The Lee Team:
Students in schools of 601-1200 students showed higher achievement gainsthan those in schools of 1,201-1,500 students. Students in high schools of fewer than 300 performed worse. Disadvantaged students suffered disproportionate achievement costs invery large or very small schools; enrollments of 601-900 offered the best equity andexcellence compromise.

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